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Japanese foods--Wagashi


torakris
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The first thought that comes to mind is some kind of shiroan enrobed with tempered white chocolate. Or even a baked or steamed manju covered, again enrobed with white chocolate.

Needless to say, I am a big fan of white chocolate.

*Edited to add: Maybe a semi-preserved and semi-dehydrated strawberry or peeled kyoho grape center in the shiroan? Obviously, the treats would need to be eaten relatively quickly in that case. I may have to try this myself!

Edited by sanrensho (log)
Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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Ideas - my sons said they want to make some kind of wagashi for their White Day "return gifts".  I thought that was not a bad concept, so how about it?

Your brief is:

* transportable

* seasonal

* some use of "white".

And just so you know, the idea of plain white dango (dumplings) was rejected!

How about haupia chichi dango. I think you just substitute coconut milk for the evaporated (?) milk.

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  • 1 month later...

Can anyone here kindly point me to any sellers of wagashi who are willing to ship internationally from Japan? (I.e. to me in Canada :wink: )

I'm most interested in higashi (dry sweets), particularly those made of wasanbon. The Futari Shizuka higashi that were mentioned earlier in this thread would be fantastic, for example. Although frankly - any fresh wagashi would be a huge treat!

So far my searches have only turned up one seller who ships to the U.S., but not to Canada :sad:

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  • 4 months later...

There are actually two types of sakura mochi, Kanto and Kansai styles.

Wikipidia entry of sakuramochi

The Kanto style uses a bigger leaf. If I remember correctly, I didn't eat the leaf when I was small (and lived in Tokyo).

In the Kansai style, the leaf is almost integral with the mochi. Many people there eat the leaf as well.

This I learned only yesterday. Here in Niigata, the Kansai style is prevalent. I don't know why. To tell you the truth, I have totally forgotten what the Kanto style sakura mochi looks like.

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^^^When I was living there, I spent 95% of my time in the Kanto/Tokyo area, and I think I only had the Kansai style during that entire time.

I wouldn't be surprised if the Kansai style is much more prevalent throughout Japan. It seems like it is easier to make, especially homemade.

Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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Wagashi is closely associated with matcha, which is, in turn, closely associated with sado (the way of tea, tea ceremory, etc.) In most households in Japan, matcha is almost nonexistent (in the form of powder). We usually have wagashi with regular green tea (sencha).

Matcha is, however, very popular nowadays as an ingredient of confections and ice creams.

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  • 1 month later...
what is the self life of namagashi???

I've never thought about the expiration date of namagashi... A quick google search tells me that the number of days they are good for after manufacture ranges from 3 to 7 depending on the type.

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thanks... wanted to ask also... any etiquette in eating wagashi in lets say a wagashi shop like toraya... can u order different kinds of wagashi .. like manju , yokan , namagashi and eat them in a single seating by yourself???

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You can, but you'd probably feel ill! They do go well with green tea, and some are designed to go with the sharp, bitter taste of foamy tea-ceremony tea...but one is about as many as you'd want in a sitting. The etiquette is to fold up any extras in paper and slip them into your kimono sleeve...

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Do we really have to answer that question of Lucil?? :biggrin:

Of course, the wagashi shop will be happy to fill your order. The best customer is the one who orders the most... I don't think this has nothing to do with etiquette...

Like Helen implied, though, I don't think you can have that many wagashi all at once.

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  • 1 year later...

Do you think that's because white bean jam is a minority taste in the first place, or do you think the problem is the bland plus bland effect of rather doughy crust with a very mild bean jam?

I'm not too fond of custard taiyaki either, but I can imagine white bean taiyaki being quite good with something more aromatic. Citrus? Tropical flavor? A dab of black sesame paste?

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Do you think that's because white bean jam is a minority taste in the first place, or do you think the problem is the bland plus bland effect of rather doughy crust with a very mild bean jam?

I'm not too fond of custard taiyaki either, but I can imagine white bean taiyaki being quite good with something more aromatic. Citrus? Tropical flavor? A dab of black sesame paste?

Maybe I should have clarified what I meant by Shiroi Taiyaki. I meant "Shiroi Taiyaki" of Fujiya, the type of taiyaki whose crust is made with tapioca flour to get that mochi-mochi texture.

Images of Shiro Taiyaki

I bought regular azuki (140 yen), custard, matcha, and chocolate (150 yen each).

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Aha! I have seen those, without really registering what they were. The combination of chewy, doughy crust plus soft/heavy filling doesn't sound great, but I'll put the Junior Research Team onto it!

Which did you think worked better - the heavier bean filling, or lighter custardy fillings?

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Aha! I have seen those, without really registering what they were. The combination of chewy, doughy crust plus soft/heavy filling doesn't sound great, but I'll put the Junior Research Team onto it!

Which did you think worked better - the heavier bean filling, or lighter custardy fillings?

I'd say neither worked quite right with the mochi-mochi texture.

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