Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Pop up market pricing?


Dan K
 Share

Recommended Posts

So I had a pretty successful first year selling truffles, caramels, and other candy at my local farmer's market (details in this thread), but I'm not going to have time this year to do that much again. Luckily, the law has changed in Illinois and we can sell directly to consumers or at a "pop up" market at a local business (with their permission, of course). I reached out to the owners of my local coffee shop, and they think it would be a great idea. A couple times during the holiday season, I can set up a table for a few hours on a Sunday.

 

So my question is about the logistics of this. Has anyone done something like this before? How do I make it worthwhile for the business? Is it enough that I'm bringing in customers? (I do have a small following that will definitely come in - they were disappointed to learn I couldn't do the market this year). Should I offer a percentage of revenue? A flat rate?

 

Any advice would be welcome. Thanks!

 

~Dan

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If they  haven't already suggested some type of reimbursement for the time/space, you might offer that with every coffee shop purchase above X dollars, you'll give a percentage off of a purchase of your product (bring your receipt showing a $20 or more purchase and receive 10% off your chocolate purchase ).... that encourages people to spend more with them and with you. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not a popup per se but the information might be relevant:  before COVID two local merchants in the same local shopping center had a deal.  One merchant was my wine and spirits monger, the other was a well-regarded Chinese noodle restaurant and a Japanese sushi bar.  Under the same roof.

 

The deal was purchase a bottle of wine (or for that matter a bottle of rum) and bring the receipt to the restaurant for a discount on your meal.

 

Since then the wine store changed ownership and the restaurant closed during COVID for renovation.  The restaurant is promoting their grand reopening.

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...