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KennethT

Week in coastal Central Vietnam foodblog

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OK.... here we go again!!!  While this post is a bit premature (we don't take off until around 1:30AM tonight), I am extremely excited so I figured I'd just set up the topic now.  As in previous foodblogs, I may post a bit from time to time while we're there, depending on how good my internet connection is, and how much free time I have... but the bulk of posting will really get started around July 9th - the day after we get home (hopefully without too much jetlag!!!)

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@KennethT  Your blogs are always interesting.  I am looking forward to another. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Where are you heading ? Da Nang, Hue, Hoi An ?

Enjoy your trip and looking forward to some great food !

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Looking forward to this.  The SE Pacific is a region I know I wont get to with my wife's shellfish allergies, so I can live vicariously through fantastic posts like these!

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We will be in Hoi An and Hue primarily. We'll probably spend a half day or so in Danang.

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So we landed brightvand early at 4:15am in Taiwan. Unfortunately, the free beach chairs I had been so fond of in the past are gone, so we're having trouble finding a comfy place to hang out until the food place opens at 6. On the bright side, our flight to Saigon is delayed about a half hour, so we can have a more relaxing breakfast...

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Those who have read my previous foodblogs should recognize this:

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Half a day in Danang is about right. Looking forward to hearing about your adventures!

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Hard at work gathering data for further posts... It's a tough job, but someone has to do it...

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To all those who think that all Vietnamese food is "just so healthy," I give you Deep Fried Pork Bread or Banh Mi Cha Chien

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In someone's back yard area, I thought I saw more dew moistened rice papers (see Saigon blog for more info) but I think they're sweet potato crackers drying in the sun. They're very popular here as you see tons of vendors on the street grilling them over charcoal.

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One might think that this is a boring looking plate of fried noodles with beef, and it was, but who cares when it came with this view!

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Bun mam nem!!!!!  I can't wait until I get home to a proper computer (actually I don't want to go home but for the purpose of this post uitt made  my point better) to write about this stuff!

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Edited by KennethT (log)
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Ah! That reminds me! What herbs/greens do you actually encounter in salads? In Japan, houttuynia cordata (lizardtail plant, chameleon plant, fish mint) is just a herb, but since I heard that it was used in salads in Vietnam, I've occasionally used the very young shoots early in the summer, before they flower and get tough and gnarly tasting. Is it a seasonal garnish in Vietnam?

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I don't think I've ever seen a "salad" in Vietnam. Usually herbs and greens are accompaniments to a certain dish. I've definitely run into the fish mint (diep ca in Vietnamese) several times - but it's always buried among a variety of herbs and greens that accompany something. But my experience is certainly limited compared to a local's, so maybe I've just never seen it?

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1 hour ago, helenjp said:

Ah! That reminds me! What herbs/greens do you actually encounter in salads? In Japan, houttuynia cordata (lizardtail plant, chameleon plant, fish mint) is just a herb, but since I heard that it was used in salads in Vietnam, I've occasionally used the very young shoots early in the summer, before they flower and get tough and gnarly tasting. Is it a seasonal garnish in Vietnam?

 

 

It is most commonly served as a salad vegetable here in S. China (near the Viet border) and I have often been served it as such in N. Vietnam. 

 

  http://liuzhou.co.uk/wordpress/2011/11/25/friday-food-2-lizards-tail/  

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@Shelby I was wondering why I didn't see you here... If I hadn't seen you post in other topics, I would have gotten worried about you!

 

I'll definitely talk more in detail about the pork toast, everything else, and more but I'm waiting to get home so I can stop typing on this annoying cell phone and I can get all the photos together from 3 different sources... This part us just the teaser... Stay tuned!

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2 hours ago, KennethT said:

@Shelby I was wondering why I didn't see you here... If I hadn't seen you post in other topics, I would have gotten worried about you!

 

I'll definitely talk more in detail about the pork toast, everything else, and more but I'm waiting to get home so I can stop typing on this annoying cell phone and I can get all the photos together from 3 different sources... This part us just the teaser... Stay tuned!

Ok, ok....patience is not my strong suit.  LOL kidding ;)

 

Take your time...and have a WONDERFUL  time :)

 

 

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2 hours ago, KennethT said:

@Shelby I was wondering why I didn't see you here... If I hadn't seen you post in other topics, I would have gotten worried about you!

 

I'll definitely talk more in detail about the pork toast, everything else, and more but I'm waiting to get home so I can stop typing on this annoying cell phone and I can get all the photos together from 3 different sources... This part us just the teaser... Stay tuned!

 

I'm delighted to hear that you will have more to say about the intriguing cuisine you're enjoying. I was getting frustrated Googling for more info and having nothing but Vietnamese language sites come up, complete with diacritics I did not include in my search and then not being able to translate. I completely understand now, and thank you for taking time to do this, and I'll be looking forward to more education on Vietnamese food once you return home.

 

Are your hydroponic gardens going to be okay while you're gone?

 

Have a great time! It looks like you are off to an awesome start.

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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Tftc, I hope so! I cut down the basil tree because it drinks just way too much, so the remaining pkants should be fine unless I have a pump failure or something, which isn't likely. While I'm here I'm kerping an ete out fir any potential new roomates... ;)

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