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Chris Hennes

Cooking with Dorie Greenspan's "Waffles: From Morning to Midnight"

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Michigan Grids (p. 54)

 

These are a dense waffle made with a significant proportion of oats, with milk and cottage cheese as the liquid. Flavor-wise they are quite complex, spiced with black pepper, cinnamon, vanilla, almond, and orange, and studded with dried cherries. Overall they were quite successful, and definitely needed no topping. The recipe says it makes four waffles, but I got only three out of my Belgian-style waffle iron, significantly fewer than most of the other recipes in the book.

 

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Chris Hennes
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chennes@egullet.org

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1 hour ago, Chris Hennes said:

Michigan Grids (p. 54)

 

I read this as Michelin Grids.

 

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I make a crisp waffle with half semolina flour and half white whole wheat flour (King Arthur) it uses yeast. 

I set a sponge the night before, add liquid, water or milk, 1 cup, just as my bread recipe, then beat in 2 eggs, 3 tablespoons oil (or melted butter- coolec), 2 tablespoons sugar, teaspoon salt.  This is a very thin liquid to which I add 2 cups of the mixed flours, 1/2 cup at a time until the batter is the right consistency.  This can vary from 1 3/4 cups to 2 cups depending on the humidity.  

 

If you have a favorite waffle recipe, just substitute 1/2 the flour for semolina or durum flour. 

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Creamy Cottage Cheese Waffles with Peach-Honey Pour (p. 42)

 

These are a very simple waffle, differing from a standard buttermilk affair only in replacing the liquid with a 50/50 mix of milk and cottage cheese, and sweetening very slightly with honey. She suggests serving these with a "peach-honey pour", a peach puree with lemon juice and honey added to taste. Since peaches are currently in season here in Oklahoma and basically every stand at this weekend's farmer's market had them the timing seemed auspicious. The pour was indeed delicious (of course) and took full advantage of the waffles' geometry. The waffles themselves are soft and mild, lending themselves to this sort of topping. The picture below is a lie, I added far more of the peach puree after taking the shot.

 

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Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Posted (edited)

Halloween Waffles p 144

IMG_1376.thumb.jpg.402a3651ccbf8b49101447106b68c303.jpg

This recipe intrigued me.  Along with the usual flour, butter, eggs, baking powder,  it includes raw, grated acorn squash, diced apple, chopped pecans and yellow cornmeal.  They are sweetened with maple syrup and the only other liquid is apple cider - no dairy. 

I found them rather heavy and too sweet for my taste.  Kind of like eating an apple muffin.   I used a fairly coarsely ground cornmeal (the same I've used in other waffles) and since there was no resting time, some of it was unpleasantly hard.  This was improved somewhat in the leftovers that I froze and reheated in the CSO.  

Dorie suggests topping with maple syrup or applesauce or as a main course with a chunk of sharp cheese and a side of a lightly dressed green vegetable.   I went with a lightly dressed salad of frisée, sliced apple, Gorgonzola, toasted walnuts and speck. 

I don't think I will make these again but if I did, I'd use a finer cornmeal and skip or reduce the maple syrup.  The apple is to be cut in small dice, I think I'd just grate it the same size as the squash and I'd probably use a different squash as acorn squash are a pain in the butt to peel. 

 

The batter shows how much squash and apple are in the mix, adding to the moistness of the waffles:

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Edited by blue_dolphin (log)
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All very enticing. I am just afraid to ruin my taste memory - Belgian waffle as a kid - crisp/tender perfection with real cream and berries at Ports O' Call Village in San Pedro - long gone..  And I do not usually care for pancakes or waffles. Yes I am odd '-

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