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DianaM

The Bread Topic (2016-)

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Posted (edited)
On 3/27/2019 at 2:16 PM, ElsieD said:

What wasn't apparent with the round loaf became glaringly obvious with the loaf and that was the lack of salt. 

@ElsieD,  When I was a kid, my grandfather was on a salt reduced diet.  My grandmother would make salt free bread for him.   I loved it buttered and sprinkled with salt.   

 

Was your dough really stiff?   At only 50% hydration?


Edited by Ann_T (log)
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15 hours ago, Franci said:

@ElsieD  roughly

 

Flour 700gr (I used KA)

 

water  550gr 

 

Fresh yeast  8gr (I used 3 g total of red star active dry)

 

2 tablespoon lard (I used extra virgin olive oil 

 

salt 15g (plus more coarse to sprinkle) 

 

 

 

11am. For the poolish: mix 300 g flour and 300gr water, half of the yeast. Mix and let raise at 20C. 3pm: dissolve the remaining yeast in 30g water, add 30 g flour, mix and cover.  Pour the remaining water 220g in the bowl of the mixer and slowly add the flour (370g),  start mixing on low speed for about 2 minutes, cover and let rest 45 minutes. Turn the stand mixer back on add the yeast made in the afternoon and slowly add the poolish  until incorporated, then add the salt. Switch from the hook to the paddle attachment, start on slow and increase a little bit until the dough holds together. Switch to the hook attachment again and add oil or lard mixing until incorporated.  Let rise until about 6-6:30pm and then divide the dough in two on a heavily dusted table. Give some foldings to the doughs. Transfer them to two oiled pans, let them rest covered half an hour and then very gently stretch. You can leave them higher like a bread or make a focaccia with it. Let double in bulk, spray some oil and sprinkle with coarse salt and bake at 480 F 10 minutes on the lower shelf and then 10 more minutes in the middle. I baked slightly less.  
 
P.S.: You can simplify the second part of it. Starting at 3pm adding directly to the poolish the remaining flour, water and yeast and proceed with the recipe. 

 

 

@Franci Did you use all-purpose or bread flour?  And thank you for this.

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17 hours ago, Franci said:

I wanted to make some bread today but forgot to make the biga I needed yesterday night, so I was looking for something faster. I had a memory from my hometown of something called panfocaccia and was hoping that the “pane pizza” from Adriano’s blog would be similar. Different but good bread alternative for dinner. 

 

1BD8C878-59F8-4E53-B74A-F3C32DC142C3.jpeg

572B1DED-596F-49DF-A486-CE493105123C.jpeg

Beautiful bread, and the beech wood cutting board is one I would wish to use. I am extremely envious...

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2 hours ago, ptw1953 said:

Beautiful bread, and the beech wood cutting board is one I would wish to use. I am extremely envious...

 

Thanks @ptw1953. Cutting board, bought cheaply in a restaurant supply store in Italy. I left for a weekend and my husband put it in the dishwasher...it is now much lighter in color than used to be! 

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9 hours ago, Ann_T said:

@ElsieD,  When I was a kid, my grandfather was on a salt reduced diet.  My grandmother would make salt free bread for him.   I loved it buttered and sprinkled with salt.   

 

Was your dough really stiff?   At only 50% hydration?

 

 

Yes, it was stiffer than what I am used to.  I guessed at the 50% hydration as i am not sure how much water I actually used.  

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3 minutes ago, Ann_T said:

Looks great to me  @JoNorvelleWalker.  I really love the golden colour. 

 

Forgive me for poor taste* but what came to mind for my baguette tonight was Thalidomide loaf.

 

 

*I knew a Thalidomide victim and, yes, it is not all that funny.

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19 hours ago, Franci said:

 

Thanks @ptw1953. Cutting board, bought cheaply in a restaurant supply store in Italy. I left for a weekend and my husband put it in the dishwasher...it is now much lighter in color than used to be! 

I would give it 3 or more coatings of mineral oil. That would re-energise the wood, and darken it a tad. Beech has a wonderul close grain (aka medullary rays)...

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Posted (edited)

These are my Scottish morning rolls.

 

Most Scots will know them, and will have eaten them at some point in their lives. Filled with anything, from cheese to Link sausage, they are a good eat.

 

Tonight, my wife and I will have a couple of rolls filled with Bramley apple and honey pork sausages that I made a couple of months ago; they are fully defrosted, and ready to be cooked. The sausages will be topped with confit onions, and a drizzle of HP sauce. Heaven!

 

Any sausages left will be let to cool, and consumed, in front of the telly; by being dipped into the Aoli that I am about to make.

 

Sometimes, the basic foods are the best...

 

(they are all 85g, except for the one i have opened...)

 

 

 

 

Scottish morning rolls 4....jpg

Scottish morning rolls 1....jpg

Scottish morning rolls 2....jpg

Scottish morning rolls 3....jpg

Scottish morning rolls 5....jpg


Edited by ptw1953 (log)
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Those look a great deal like my dinner rolls, which are the basic salt, flour, water, yeast, with the addition of some softened butter and an egg. I always make extra to have sandwiches of whatever is on hand.. Especially Easter and Christmas, with leftover ham and/or roast beef. It's the lunch of marvels.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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7 hours ago, kayb said:

Those look a great deal like my dinner rolls, which are the basic salt, flour, water, yeast, with the addition of some softened butter and an egg. I always make extra to have sandwiches of whatever is on hand.. Especially Easter and Christmas, with leftover ham and/or roast beef. It's the lunch of marvels.

 

I will try making these with butter (I use Cookeen shortening) and an egg next time.

 

I could re-name them Scottish/American morning rolls (or hybrid rolls)...🙂

 

For our wedding anniversary breakfast, today, my wife and I are having a couple of these cut open, and soaked in an egg and milk mixture to make french toast. Served with oven crisped streaky bacon, adorned with blueberries, and drizzled with Manuka honey...

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5 hours ago, ptw1953 said:

 

I will try making these with butter (I use Cookeen shortening) and an egg next time.

 

I could re-name them Scottish/American morning rolls (or hybrid rolls)...🙂

 

For our wedding anniversary breakfast, today, my wife and I are having a couple of these cut open, and soaked in an egg and milk mixture to make french toast. Served with oven crisped streaky bacon, adorned with blueberries, and drizzled with Manuka honey...

 

Happy anniversary! 

 

Being mostly of Scottish descent, I am highly in favor of Scottish rolls. You may, however, keep the haggis.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Posted (edited)
On 4/6/2019 at 8:13 AM, ptw1953 said:

These are my Scottish morning rolls.

 

@ptw1953, beautiful rolls.  Are they the same as we call Scottish Bap Buns?  

 

172948518_April7thBakeDoughfromApril6th1.thumb.jpg.7cba0c8cdcaf97934a34d4383498dd24.jpg

 

Made two pizzas for dinner last night and baked five baguettes with the remaining dough.

 

1591972651_April7thBakeDoughfromApril6th.thumb.jpg.535b68d273bb9035419b2c3dca8249be.jpg

 

Sliced this morning.


Edited by Ann_T (log)
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@Ann_T In some areas of Scotland, they would indeed be called Baps. In my area of Dumfries-shire, where I grew up, we would just refer to them as rolls.

 

We would call soft rolls Baps. They would have had an egg wash applied to them, and be very close to french  brioche buns in texture.

 

Your bread is always stunning. I am going to search the forum for where you have posted the recipe for that pizza/baguette dough (I am certain you will have been asked for it before...), and use it for barbeque pizzas this coming weekend (assuming, of course, that the Scottish weather improved greatly)...

 

Philip

 

 

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  @Ann_T  This should make 12 rolls.

550g Strong Bread Flour
28g Shortening, softened (I use Cookeen, but no reason why butter cannot be used)
17g Fresh Yeast (or 7g of instant Yeast)
11g Sugar
9g Salt
400ml water @ circa 110F \43C
Rice flour to dust

 

Pre-heat your oven to 260C.


Combine all the dry ingredients in a bowl, add the shortening, and give it all a good mix. Add the water and mix well. This results in a fairly slack dough, i.e. quite sticky. I knead mine as best as I can by hand in the bowl, but using a Kitchen Aid or a Kenwood Chef would, perhaps, be easier.  It doesn't  need a lot of kneading. I have found that 5 minutes is fine.

Now the slightly tricky part. You need to measure 3oz (85g) of dough per roll. I dust my scales with rice flour and have a baking sheet dusted with rice flour too. This allows you to shape the rolls without getting in a big sticky mess. Shape into a ball first, making sure the top surface is as smooth as possible. Then flatten it down slightly, into a hockey puck shape, on the baking sheet. Do this with all 12 rolls in 3 rows of 4, or 4 rows of 3. Don't leave too big a gap between rolls (perhaps 25mm?) as you want them to expand into each other as they rise. This gives the distinctive white open sides with the browned top, when you separate them after baking.

Leave them to rise in a warmish place (circa 21C), inside a large black plastic bag. I leave mine for 2 hours, or until they have more than doubled in size, and have all joined up. Dust the tops lightly with rice flour.

Put the baking sheet near the top shelf of your oven for 9 minutes, or circa 11-12 minutes if you like them well-fired.

 

Enjoy warm or cold, filled with haggis, or black pudding, or a fried egg, or some cheese, etc, etc, etc...

 

* Next time I bake these rolls, I will be increasing the weight of them, from 85g to 122.5g. This will provide 8 larger rolls, rather than 12 smaller ones...
 

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@Ann_T

 

Stunning, absolutely stunning! That is what Scottish morning rolls should look like...

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