Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Hermann Morr

Cappelletti con sugo di Stracotto

Recommended Posts

When grandmum made Cappelletti last christmas i took some pics , so i can share this tutorial.

 

P1620389.JPG

 

Cappelletti are pillows of pasta stuffed with bread, parmesan and stracotto juice, cooked in a chicken broth soup.
So what is Stracotto: its just a Pot Roast made from some tough and unexpensive beef cut, simmered for a long time, 6 to 10 hours depending on the cut you choose and your willingness of making the ultimate sacrifice driyng your meat in order to get the best roast juice vs having a proper and tender pot roast on your table.

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Start heating some olive oil in a pot and sweating finely cut onion, carrot, celery and garlic.
Add a couple bay leaves, one rosemary branch, sage. Brown the meat.
You may use just beef or add more meats to your liking, like a quarter capon, a pork rib, a sausage.

Once the meat is browned pour a glass of still red wine, let it dry, cover with water or stock, adjust salt and turn fire to minimum.

 

P1620376.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cover the pot and let it simmer. You can use a common lid, but true parmesan grandmums cover their stracotto pots with a clay dish with a thin crack running through the middle and fill it with wine and sweet spices, like cinnamom and clover.

In theory the evaporating wine should penetrate through the crack and diffuse the spices scent in your simmering pot.

 

 

P1620374.JPG

 

 

Simmering does'nt have to happen all the same day, tradition is starting friday with all the preps, simmering a few time, then turning off the fire and starting again saturday morning.
At last the meat should be falling apart as you touch it with a fork.

Once it's done separate the clean juice with a sieve.
The solid vegetable bits and a small part of the juice will season the stracotto meat, serve it with polenta or tagliatelle noodles. Or mash if you just can't live without.

The liquid part will be the flavour of your cappelletti stuff.

 


Edited by Hermann Morr (log)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the stuff you need 150 grams ground bread ( 5 oz. ), 150 grams ground parmesan, two eggs, pinch of megnut and your stracotto juice.

 

P1620378.JPG

 

Mix bread, cheese, eggs and megnut in a bowl, pour the warm juice and knead with your hands till you have a firm and uniform dough.

Parmesan cheese should be at least 30 months old to have the right texture.

 

P1620379.JPG

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the pasta dough you need 1 kg all-purpose flour, 200 grams semolina and eight eggs.
Mix all toghether, add a few water and salt, knead.
Kneading will take some time, 20 minutes minimum, italian cookin doesn't require expensive ingredients, but is labour intensive.

Once in a while cut the dough to see how it is inside. When you find tiny bubbles it's done.

 

P1620382.JPG


Edited by Hermann Morr (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now pasta machine time: make long sheets.

 

P1620386.JPG

 

 

Distribute bits of stuff over the sheets, fold and cut your cappelletti with the help of a tiny glass.

Press the glass strongly or the edges won't seal perfectly.

 
 
P1620385.JPG
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Beautiful! I also thank you.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Melania
      It's one o'clock on a warm summer's day in Florence, I'm on my way to get ingredients for lunch. The sun is high in the sky, the cobblestones are warm under my feet and the aroma of something delicious is in the air. My mind starts to drift to the onions, celery and tomatoes I need for my pasta sauce, oh and don't forget something sweet for dessert...this truly is la dolce vita.
       
      My thoughts are soon interrupted by an unwelcome "chiuso" sign on the door of my new favorite deli. The blinds are closed and the friendly owners are nowhere in sight. The reality of having my favorite pasta dish for lunch was slipping further and further away.
       
       
      What a nightmare! How can this be?
        A local passing by must have noticed my frustration.   "Signorina, è riposo. Tutto è chiuso!"
        Of course! How could I forget about the sacred Italian siesta?
        A siesta or riposo, as most Italians call it, is a time of rest. This time is usually around midday, or the hottest part of the day (very inconvenient if you're craving a bowl of pasta.) No one can really say where the tradition of the siesta originates, but many say it's all about food (no surprises there really).
        For many Italian families the main meal of the day is lunch. This heavy meal in the middle of the day is attributed to the standard Mediterranean diet: A minuscule breakfast of a coffee and pastry , a heavy lunch and an evening meal around 10 o'clock. The logic is that after such a heavy meal one would surely be drowsy and need to rest, no one can work efficiently on a full stomach!
        Post offices, car rentals, supermarkets and even coffee shops (in some smaller towns police stations too) all close their doors for a riposo. Everything comes to a standstill as every Italian goes home to kick of their shoes, enjoy a homemade lunch with family and bask in the Italian sunshine for three to four hours. This is serious business. One would not dare work for 8 hours straight. After their riposo most businesses open again around 4 o'clock and stay open till 7pm. Its the perfect balance between work and play and does wonders for your digestive system!
        "Grazie!" I thanked her for the reminder. The midday sun started to become unbearable. The streets had cleared with only a few tourists braving the midday heat still around. I thought about the strawberries I bought from the market earlier that week. Strawberries for lunch on my shaded balcony and maybe a nap afterwards sounded like my perfect riposo. The pasta will have to wait till 4.
               
           
    • By md8232
      Hello Everyone.  I’ve decided to create a separate thread for this as not to muddy up the 
      CSO thread.  It arrived this afternoon from California and is resting comfortably next to 
      the CSO.  I will add more photos and some dimensions as time permits.
      If you have questions, let me know and I’ll try to get some answers for you.
      This will be slow going.  I’m overwhelmed with things that need doing right now.
       


       
      My countertop is 49” L X 24” W X 18” H.  I haven’t fired it up yet but understand that it doesn’t vent out the back or upwards.
      Everything is bigger, just like in Texas!!  We’ll see if it is better.
       

    • By Darienne
      This is not encouraging for American consumers.  On the other hand, it's not surprising either.  From my current Consumer Reports e-download.   https://www.consumerreports.org/food-labels/seals-and-claims?EXTKEY=EE993PMAC&utm_source=acxiom&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20190926_cromc_engagewkly
       
      I'd like to know what the current labeling standards are in Canada.  Next research project.  After dealing with the bumper crop of apples...
       
    • By haresfur
      I found this article about arancino/arancina really interesting
       

    • By boilsover
      It's bad enough correcting common zombie cookware misconceptions.  But when a legitimate food expert like Mark Bittman spouts complete nonsense about all tinned cookware containing lead, it's downright dismaying.  Likewise when salespeople and companies tell that eternal doozer:  "Cast iron heats evenly."
       
      The winner for 2019--so far--however, has to be Florence Fabricant, New York Times columnist and author of 12 cookbooks.  In her January 22, 2019 issue of her column "Front Burner", Ms. Fabricant gushes over the carbon steel skillet made by Made In.  Among other reasons to recommend it:
       
      "It’s a good conductor (it can be used on an induction cooktop) and has heft..."
       
      What?  Surely Fabricant knows carbon steel, like any steel, is not only *not* a good conductor, it's a *terrible* one.   In fact it's the worst metal pans are made of.  If she doesn't, she needs to take a remedial physics course.
       
      And perhaps she was under a deadline to push this out, but what gives with the non sequitur explanatory parenthetical?  Does she really believe that good conductivity and induction compatibility are the same or even closely related?
       
      Doubtless, someone, somewhere has already taken this nonsense for Gospel and spread it around.  "Oh, boy!  I can't wait for my new conductive steel skillet to be delivered!" 
      Do you see, Larry?  Do you see what happens when you make stuff up?
       
      https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/22/dining/made-in-carbon-steel-skillet.html
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...