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Rafa

Drinks! 2014 (Part 1)

587 posts in this topic

I like A Moment of Silence as well. What kind of Daron did you get, the Fine or the XO? If it's the XO, it's pretty good on its own already.

 

I've been making all kinds of cocktails that call for Laird's with calvados and have rarely been disappointed. Here are a few ideas for you: the American Trilogy (an Old Fashioned variation), the Lionheart, the Diamondback Lounge (the original with yellow chartreuse, on the rocks), Jeff Morgenthaler's Norwegian Wood (works best with the XO), Audrey Saunders' Tantris Sidecar.

 

Last but not least, here is one I've been making a lot this winter, a twist on Eric Lorincz's Norman Conquest: 1 oz each scotch, calvados, and sweet vermouth, 1 teaspoon Drambuie, Angostura and Peychaud's bitters, stir, strain on ice, orange twist (see here).

 

Calvados is also excellent in ice cream and crêpes. Enjoy your recent purchase!

Fantastic - thank you!

To answer your question, I got the Daron Fine.

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At our favourite bar the Hawthorn Lounge last night we were introduced to Malacca gin.  What lovely stuff!  I had it in a Perfect Martini which, if it wasn't perfect, was certainly close.

 

Other highlights of the evening were a Green Point - new to me, but now on my list of things to make at home - and a rum Old Fashioned with a slosh of Chartreuse Elixir Vegetale.

 

A good time was had by all.


Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

eGullet Ethics Code signatory

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I've never tried the bonded Laird's.  I drink the 88 proof twelve year old stuff.  I'll plan to experiment with the bonded and report back.

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I'm pretty sure the mai tai recipe I posted earlier using Atlantico Private Cask is my best mai tai variation yet.  I'm trying hard to get some S&C, and if I do I can't wait to try some with Atlantico and Gosling's Old.  I've been trying to find 15 year old Pusser's, so far without success.

 

Meanwhile I am assembling the makings for a zombie, but it will be at least a few more weeks till I acquire all the necessary stuff.

 

I would love another mai tai but I don't know if I dare.

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Other highlights of the evening were a Green Point - new to me, but now on my list of things to make at home

 

Tried this last night with Wild Turkey 101 Rye, Punt e Mes, Yellow Chartreuse MOFS, and both Angostura and Angostura Orange bitters.

 

The Angostura Orange bitters were a terrible mistake...glycerin, clove & cinnamon walked all over everything. Nearly made the drink end up in the sink. Will this again, but using the Saveur recipe.


True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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My Mexican friends assure me that your instincts are right. High quality agave (and similar) spirits are meant to be sipped, not even mixed. One of my friends shuddered at using a 100% agave añejo tequila in a paloma, for ex.

 

Wait till you try sotol!

 

I would have to concur! For me, with rare exception the añejo's are for sipping or maybe a delicate Tequila Old Fashioned with a touch of agave nectar and a dash of mole bitters.

 

Reposado tends to be the jack of all trades and the blanco, well I admit I rarely use them for anything any more but if you are going to shoot tequila with salt and lime for effect rather than enjoy the taste it doesn't really matter what you use! Indeed, in that situation the nastier the better it would seem in order to produce the appropriate grimace...

 

Sotol is in an interesting but different category for me as it generally seems like a much lighter spirit than tequila.


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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From yesterday - a Daiquiri No.2 with 2 oz J.M rhum agricole, 3/4 oz lime juice, 1/2 oz simple syrup, barspoon Clément créole shrubb, barspoon orange juice. Rhum agricole in a Daiquiri of some type (my standard bartender's choice order) is always a good thing.

 

13118018234_398f74dcc8_z.jpg
 

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Would that it weren't 30ºF with 60mph winds....

 

 

 

by the way, is this what's known as a Floridita Daiquiri No. 2, or is there some other classification?


Edited by Hassouni (log)

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I'm trying a mai tai of half S&C and half Atlantico.  This works pretty well.  The jury is stil out on whether I like this combination better than my current favorite which is equal parts Pusser's, W&N, and Atlantico.  I think I'd have to have them side by side.  I have yet to try the S&C and Atlantico with Gosling's Old.  So many combinations.  So much work left to be done!  Still no Appleton 12.

 

About S&C, I know someplace there is a rum thread but I gave up looking for it, I might as well just ask my question here.  Does anyone know for how long S&C is aged?

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I can't remember which is which, but it is roughly half "Plummer" distillation and half "Wedderburn", both of which are pot-still distillates, and very according to the ester count, with Plummers being 150-200ppm, and Wedderburn being 200-500ppm. One is aged about 18 months, the other about 3 years.  You can look up the fine detail at alpenz.com, but that's what I remember from the top of my head.

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I can't remember which is which, but it is roughly half "Plummer" distillation and half "Wedderburn", both of which are pot-still distillates, and very according to the ester count, with Plummers being 150-200ppm, and Wedderburn being 200-500ppm. One is aged about 18 months, the other about 3 years.  You can look up the fine detail at alpenz.com, but that's what I remember from the top of my head.

 

Thanks, I found it:  half aged less than a year.  The other half split between eighteen months and three years.

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Last night's effort was a Gin Old Fashioned.  A nice simple drink, as befits an Old Fashioned; gin (I used Junipero), Cointreau and Angostura with a lemon twist.  Quite pleasant, particularly after a bit of dilution from the ice kicked in, but not stunning.

 

Then, because it was Thursday, I made another one, this time with some of the second batch of my gin which, those in the know tell me, is rather more like a Genever.  Wow!  A much bigger, richer drink altogether.  This now goes onto our personal Top 10, which by now probably contains at least 30 cocktails ...


Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

eGullet Ethics Code signatory

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Well, it certainly didn't make it worse!

Tonight we're trying some of my navy strength (55%) in Death's Door (sorry, linking to Kindred is too hard on my phone, but it's there). Gin, Lillet, Averna, Cassis. I have a warm oesophagus right now.

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Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

eGullet Ethics Code signatory

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The Second Wind spoken of a couple of pages ago. Coruba instead of Cruzan. This drink did not smell inviting. But I like it. It's a monster. A monster that'll make you want to eat some dark chocolate alongside.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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This is so deserving of a name:

 

1 1/2 oz London Dry Gin (Traders)

1 tsp Nocino (Miho's homemade)

several dashes Chris Taylor' Suburban Asian Bitters

 

Medicinal, complex, bitter, boozy.


It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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This is so deserving of a name:

 

1 1/2 oz London Dry Gin (Traders)

1 tsp Nocino (Miho's homemade)

several dashes Chris Taylor' Suburban Asian Bitters

 

Medicinal, complex, bitter, boozy.

 

I made this using an 'Islay Dry'--The Botanist--as the base spirit. I like it. A contemplative drink. First time I've used those Suburban Asian bitters, too. Thanks.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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A New York Sour:

 

2 oz Old Grand-Dad 114

3/4 oz Lemon Juice

1/2 oz Rich Simple

1 Egg White

 

Mime shake.

Shake with 60 g crushed ice until completely dissolved.

Strain over large ice in a rocks glass.

Float 1/2 oz Russian River Valley Cabernet Franc.

 

Was inspired by the spice in the Cab Franc to try pairing it with the OGD. This was very nice. I love the texture you get from the egg white with the crushed ice method.


True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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We tried the Old Ironsides from Cocktail Virgin Slut.

 

2 oz Spiced Rum (Kraken)
1/2 oz Cherry Heering
1/2 oz Cynar

001 (480x640).jpg

 

I was not wild for it. It tasted like three different ingredients sitting next to each other but not talking.

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As promised I'm enjoying an Autumn in Jersey with Laird's bonded and can report back.  The bonded tastes of fresh apples, like a Calvados, and less like the twelve year old Laird's, which is more like aged brandy.  Though I must say Laird's bonded is probably smoother than any Calvados I've tried.  Then again, I live in New Jersey, and not old Jersey nor Normandy.

 

2 oz Laird's bonded

1/2 oz orgeat

1 oz lemon juice

2 dashes Angostura (or maybe 1 1/2 dashes, sometimes it is hard to tell)

 

 

Note:  I've modified the Autumn in Jersey recipe.  Half an ounce of orgeat is plenty for any drink.

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Because it's a while till dinner (look for an upcoming post in another forum) I decided to have a mai tai.  Not a difficult decision, mind you.  Nice and effective mai tai, of course, but the thing is the Autumn in Jersey made with Laird's bonded transported me back to apple picking with my grandkids last fall.  Now the spell is broken.

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I am no longer a virgin.  La fee verte has had her way with me.  Some observations:  she is strong.  Out of the bottle her scent is most alluring.  Not so much so after louching.  (Is that a verb?)  And the louching took over an hour, after which the drink wasn't very cold.  I think I would like it better chilled.  The first few sips were challenging.  Then for some reason she slipped down easily.

 

I would have another glass but alas I don't have another hour.

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An experiment with my Suburban Asian bitters that one home viewer, Evan, could attempt at home. A rum Old Fashioned using Ron Zacapa 23/cane syrup/Suburban Asian bitters. I think the flavour profile of the bitters (lots of star anise, cloves, Sichuan peppercorns, a bit of ginger) works with the aged rum.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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I am no longer a virgin.  La fee verte has had her way with me.  Some observations:  she is strong.  Out of the bottle her scent is most alluring.  Not so much so after louching.  (Is that a verb?)  And the louching took over an hour, after which the drink wasn't very cold.  I think I would like it better chilled.  The first few sips were challenging.  Then for some reason she slipped down easily.

 

I would have another glass but alas I don't have another hour.

 

How did it take an hour? Just add water until it all louches is the usual procedure. It doesn't need to be done on an ultra-slow drip (I assume that's what was going on?)

 

Jamie Boudreau has a good video on it:

 

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