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"The Book of Schmaltz" - the new iPad app

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Michael Ruhlman has just published and released his new iPad app The Book of Schmaltz, a Love Song to a Forgotten Fat. At present, it is only available for the iPad, but will shortly be launched for other platforms. There also maybe a print version at some time. I have downloaded Schmaltz and am glad I did so and recommend others give it a look.

I am very particular about cooking apps for my iPad and iPhone. However, when I see Michael Ruhlman's name attached whether it is a book or an app I delve deeper. Schmaltz is another of his quality efforts, not only with his writing and recipe prowness, but it is further enhanced by Donna Ruhlman's excellent photography.

In my opinon, Ruhlman has the gift to weave an interesting story, while at the same time giving confidence to go into the kitchen to try the techinque or recipe. Having always been a visual learner in cooking, Donna's extensive photography further reinforces my desire to try using the recipes in my own kitchen. This is on the same tier as Bittman's How to Cook, the CIA's The Professional Chef and the Epicurious apps, among a very few others.

"A cloud o' dust! Could be most anything. Even a whirling dervish.

That, gentlemen, is the whirlingest dervish of them all." - The Professionals by Richard Brooks

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This sounds right up my valley. I don't have an iPad but my iPhone doesn't find the app. Do you know where else I can find the book?

The Gastronomical Me

Russo-Soviet food, voluptuous stories, fat and offal – from a Russian snuggled in the Big Old Smoke.

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At the moment, the book is only available for the iPad. He has commented when asked via Twitter that it will eventually be available in ebook format (I.e., Kindle, Nook, etc.) it should be available soon.

--- KensethFan

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I actually learned about this a couple of days ago, when running a search for something unrelated I stumbled upon a page on his website, and immediately spied the image of the upcoming Schmaltz book. Alas, no iPad, but according to Amazon, it'll be released in October of this year.

(Don't know if frying is covered in the book, but as an aside for those who have not tried FRYING with chicken fat (or other kinds of animal fats), oh boy, oh boy, consider trying it, you are in for an experience. Have made the crispiest, most delicious, decadent chicken fried steak and fried chicken with home rendered chicken fat, and of course, french fries cooked in duck fat are the ultimate fried food, so I'm told.)

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