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Chocolates with that backroom finish


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I haven't made any confections for probably over a year now, and figured I had better get warmed up for the 2014 Chocolate & Confections Workshop: I sort of hoped it would be like riding a bike, so of course I didn't bother reviewing any written instructions or anything intelligent like that. It took me three tries to get the temper right (tabling), but I did finally manage to nail that. However, I overheated the colored cocoa butter, I forgot to smack the molds when casting the shells, and I let the chocolate get too cool (so the shells are too thick). Doh!

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Moral of the story: read over your notes before trying something you haven't done in a long time!

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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  • 4 weeks later...

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Here's what happens when your cello covered bunnies/eggs are exposed to the sun.  Laser beams of light develop.  Strange that they seem to have gone for the eyes!

 

Just like burning ants with a magnifying glass.

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On 7/2/2012 at 11:58 AM, Kerry Beal said:

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The infamous Greweling Buckwheat Dog Turds! A classic.

Failure to table the ganache enough, failure to produce 25mm discs for the bottoms (these are more like 35 mm - so my ganache amounts are wrong) and failure to pipe evenly - which is pretty difficult when you are piping something this liquid.

Right at the bottom of the upslope on the learning curve!

 

This has actually given me an idea for a Christmas 'gift' in honor of our new dog. :D Sometimes failures are inspiration in disguise?

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  • 3 years later...

One of those ‘never again shall I .. ’ that will totally happen again - accidentally microwaving raspberry inspiration and white chocolate on high instead of 60%
 

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That’s blackened caramel bubbling forth from my white chocolate. Do you know how expensive the raspberry is? 😱

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5 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

One of those ‘never again shall I .. ’ that will totally happen again - accidentally microwaving raspberry inspiration and white chocolate on high instead of 60%
 

3D677F93-E98D-4B50-B730-08DEF794CB4E.jpeg.37980ea4759c074d73d1318e2fab430a.jpeg

 

That’s blackened caramel bubbling forth from my white chocolate. Do you know how expensive the raspberry is? 😱

Ouch! 

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