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mostlylana

Mousse Ganache

64 posts in this topic

I have just returned from Paris. While there I had a chance to try chocolates from all of the big french producers. What I noticed is that several of these producers offer mousse ganache. La Maison du Chocolat, in particular, offers several flavours in this format.

Patrick Rogers had a salted butter caramel mousse that was unbelievably good. Having never tried mousse ganache here in North America I was intrigued. I LOVE the soft texture. I checked out good 'ole Wybauw and sure enough he talks about it. Check out p. 37 in Fine Chocolates 2 - Great Ganache Experience. He mentions that air can be added by whipping the fully cooled ganache but this method will result in significantly reduced shelf life and can cause dryness. The better method, he says, is to mix the ganache with a 'frappe'. He includes some recipes for frappes for those of us who don't have access to a prepared product.

Has anyone tried either of these methods? What were the results? I am unsure as to how to proceed using a frappe. He doesn't go into much detail... I'm hoping someone has something to say!

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I used to beat one of my ganaches before piping it to make truffle mice. Loved the change in texture - they never lasted long enough for shelf life changes to be an issue.

I've used frappe in creams - but don't recall ever adding it to a ganache.

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I know it's not what you're talking about but a butter ganache is a whipped ganache that does have a good shelf life (ie., whip butter, add fondant and then chocolate) if that was a major consideration. Does it give a similar texture?

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I bought one chocolate filled with salted caramel mousse from Jean Paul Hevin- amazing taste and texture! I also brought a box of his chocolates home with me and started eating them a week later- all of them were in great shape, except for the the mousse one- the walls had collapsed inside, and it wasn't very airy anymore, so it sounds just like Wybauw's description...

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I've used frappe in creams - but don't recall ever adding it to a ganache.

To be honest - I had never heard of frappe. I'm not a coffee person and I'm assuming it's a coffee thing?? Can you tell me what it is? ...what the ingredients are? I looked at the ingredients list on the Maison du Chocolat website. None of the ingredients Wybauw listed in his frappe recipes were listed...

I know it's not what you're talking about but a butter ganache is a whipped ganache that does have a good shelf life (ie., whip butter, add fondant and then chocolate) if that was a major consideration. Does it give a similar texture?

This mousse ganache didn't have quite the same texture as a butter ganache. It was very light and airy. Actually, I have whipped some ganache and these mousse ganache seemed different than that. I wish I could peek into their workshops! I'm sure it's not a big secret as many of them do it over there. I guess the key is to do it while maintaining the stability of the ganache.

I bought one chocolate filled with salted caramel mousse from Jean Paul Hevin- amazing taste and texture! I also brought a box of his chocolates home with me and started eating them a week later- all of them were in great shape, except for the the mousse one- the walls had collapsed inside, and it wasn't very airy anymore, so it sounds just like Wybauw's description...

Wow, that sounds exactly like Wybauw's description. Thanks for sharing that. I bought several of La Maison du Chocolat's mousse ganache. They are all still doing well and that was a week ago. I think I'll leave one out for a few weeks and see how it holds up...

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I've used frappe in creams - but don't recall ever adding it to a ganache.

To be honest - I had never heard of frappe. I'm not a coffee person and I'm assuming it's a coffee thing?? Can you tell me what it is? ...what the ingredients are? I looked at the ingredients list on the Maison du Chocolat website. None of the ingredients Wybauw listed in his frappe recipes were listed...

Frappe is marshmallow cream essentially. Do you have chocolot's book Candymaking? It's called Mazetta in there.

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Frappe is marshmallow cream essentially. Do you have chocolot's book Candymaking? It's called Mazetta in there.

Yes I do have it! I'll check it out... Thanks again :)

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This subject has ben on my mind for 2 years now, and I have finally cracked it.

I loved Jean Paul Hevins salted caramel mousse, and La maison du chocolat's milk chocolate caramel mousse, and have racked my brains on how they get this result- this is not a buttercream (too tasty for that). No frappe/ egg whites in the ingredients list for la maison de chocolat's chocolates (and not that texture really). Can't just be a regular whipped ganache, since it's shelf life is pretty decent, and it took a while to dry out...


Yesterday I finished Frederic Hawecker's chocolate and confections course, in the Barry Calebaut chicago chocolate academy.

One of the recipes we made, was an orange caramel ganache. At one point chef said that this ganache can be whipped and get a really good texture.

Bells started ringing in my head- is this finally it??? Have I cracked the secret?? I asked if this was the technique for La maison's ganache. After he got over his surprise of someone knowing of that ganache, he went on to say that this technique is only used by La maison du chocolat, Patrick Roger and Jean Paul Hevin (as far as he knows), since it is pretty hard to cut.

This is a caramel based ganache, with a relatively high butter content, that is whipped at exactly 14 degrees celsius. Before cutting with a guitar, it is refrigerated, since it is pretty soft, and even then it is very hard to cut without the corners breaking (which is why he said few people make this).


After harrasing him enough, he was willing to leave out enough of that caramel ganache to whip later on (this wasn't originally in the course plan), and bingo!! After whipping it, we got the same texture from that orange chocolate mousse! That course was worth every penny :)


I can PM the exact recipe, to anyone that is interested.
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This subject has ben on my mind for 2 years now, and I have finally cracked it.
I loved Jean Paul Hevins salted caramel mousse, and La maison du chocolat's milk chocolate caramel mousse, and have racked my brains on how they get this result- this is not a buttercream (too tasty for that). No frappe/ egg whites in the ingredients list for la maison de chocolat's chocolates (and not that texture really). Can't just be a regular whipped ganache, since it's shelf life is pretty decent, and it took a while to dry out...
Yesterday I finished Frederic Hawecker's chocolate and confections course, in the Barry Calebaut chicago chocolate academy.
One of the recipes we made, was an orange caramel ganache. At one point chef said that this ganache can be whipped and get a really good texture.
Bells started ringing in my head- is this finally it??? Have I cracked the secret?? I asked if this was the technique for La maison's ganache. After he got over his surprise of someone knowing of that ganache, he went on to say that this technique is only used by La maison du chocolat, Patrick Roger and Jean Paul Hevin (as far as he knows), since it is pretty hard to cut.
This is a caramel based ganache, with a relatively high butter content, that is whipped at exactly 14 degrees celsius. Before cutting with a guitar, it is refrigerated, since it is pretty soft, and even then it is very hard to cut without the corners breaking (which is why he said few people make this).
After harrasing him enough, he was willing to leave out enough of that caramel ganache to whip later on (this wasn't originally in the course plan), and bingo!! After whipping it, we got the same texture from that orange chocolate mousse! That course was worth every penny :)
I can PM the exact recipe, to anyone that is interested.

I'd love the recipe. If you do a top 'foot' and cut with a guitar before it fully crystallizes - you can get better corners.

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I'd love it too! Great that you came back to the original topic to let everyone know, too!

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This subject has ben on my mind for 2 years now, and I have finally cracked it.
I loved Jean Paul Hevins salted caramel mousse, and La maison du chocolat's milk chocolate caramel mousse, and have racked my brains on how they get this result- this is not a buttercream (too tasty for that). No frappe/ egg whites in the ingredients list for la maison de chocolat's chocolates (and not that texture really). Can't just be a regular whipped ganache, since it's shelf life is pretty decent, and it took a while to dry out...
Yesterday I finished Frederic Hawecker's chocolate and confections course, in the Barry Calebaut chicago chocolate academy.
One of the recipes we made, was an orange caramel ganache. At one point chef said that this ganache can be whipped and get a really good texture.
Bells started ringing in my head- is this finally it??? Have I cracked the secret?? I asked if this was the technique for La maison's ganache. After he got over his surprise of someone knowing of that ganache, he went on to say that this technique is only used by La maison du chocolat, Patrick Roger and Jean Paul Hevin (as far as he knows), since it is pretty hard to cut.
This is a caramel based ganache, with a relatively high butter content, that is whipped at exactly 14 degrees celsius. Before cutting with a guitar, it is refrigerated, since it is pretty soft, and even then it is very hard to cut without the corners breaking (which is why he said few people make this).
After harrasing him enough, he was willing to leave out enough of that caramel ganache to whip later on (this wasn't originally in the course plan), and bingo!! After whipping it, we got the same texture from that orange chocolate mousse! That course was worth every penny :)
I can PM the exact recipe, to anyone that is interested.

Oh my gosh!!! I can't believe you got the secret!!! THANK YOU so much for sharing! I'm pretty excited as you can see. :smile: I've never cracked it and can't imagine we could have with those precise parameters. I can only imagine how thrilled you were when he started talking about it. HA!

Needless to say - I would love the recipe.

I do a hazelnut butter ganache with an airy texture that can also crumble when cutting. It sets quite quickly so I watch it like a hawk and cut it at just the right time. If I wait too long I might as well just start all over as it will crumble all over the place. But if I get it at the right stage of setting up, it cuts beautifully. I have heated the wires of my guitar for caramel based slabs and it does help. Maybe it would help in this case too.

Oh, I'm just so excited! Thank you again lironp.

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I've used frappe in creams - but don't recall ever adding it to a ganache.

To be honest - I had never heard of frappe. I'm not a coffee person and I'm assuming it's a coffee thing?? Can you tell me what it is? ...what the ingredients are? I looked at the ingredients list on the Maison du Chocolat website. None of the ingredients Wybauw listed in his frappe recipes were listed...

Frappe is marshmallow cream essentially. Do you have chocolot's book Candymaking? It's called Mazetta in there.

Greweling also gives a formula for frappe (in addition to the Wybauw reference already given). In a pinch, commercial marshmallow "fluff" will do.


Steve Lebowitz

Doer of All Things

Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

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I would like the recipe as well. thanks

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I wouldn't mind reading this recipe also. I think that one of the greatest chocolates I have tasted this winter in good old Paris was the lime caramel from Patrick roger and his Yuzu one. Gorgeous.

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I can PM the exact recipe, to anyone that is interested.

And me, please, please, please (especially as you're talking degrees Celcius and not those pesky Fahrenheits :blink: ). Thanks

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I think I have covered everyone in this thread and PMs, if I've forgotten to send the recipe to anyone, feel free to PM me again and I'll send the recipe, sorry for any delays!

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Thank you so much for sharing. It is a very interesting recipe. I will try it and get back to you. Merci

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