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eG Foodblog: Foodmuse (2010) - What foodblogger Grace Piper eats in a

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Wow, that does look and sound delicious! Thanks for blogging.


"I like 'em french fried pertaters." (Billy Bob Thornton as Karl, in Sling Blade.)

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....

Dinner last night was Philipine Pork Adobo. I got this recipe from a friend in Manila. It is so easy to make. Basically you dump a small amount of ingredients in to a pot, bring to boil, lower to simmer and let it go until it's done. The apartment smell amazing while is cooks.

....

I've just finished dinner but I could easily handle a bowl or two of that! Thanks for sharing your week with us.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Thanks for the great blog - you've inspired me to start making some spicy sauces and salsas. We love spicy things and it would be great to have something standing by in the fridge to kick up the flavor and heat.

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Where in the Philippines is your friend originally from? Coconut milk isn't really common in adobo, but I think they use it in Bicol or maybe in the south. Allspice, cloves and cinnamon aren't common anywhere, though, not even in non-adobo dishes. Traditionally, the only herbs and spices used in adobo are black pepper and bay leaves (and a lot of garlic, if you want to count that as an herb). Interesting variation! Just makes me wonder which part of the Philippines she's originally from.

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Thanks Grace, for sharing your stellar food. I loved it, you have been bookmarked.


Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Patti

Anna N

So glad it looks as good as it tastes! :)

llc45

I have a very easy slightly spicy papaya habanero ketchup you might like to try. I use very very little habanero, no more that quarter of one with no seeds or membrane.

prasantrin

She is from Manilla and was the one who told me to add coconut milk at the end, though it is incredible without it. The whole spices are my addition. :)

Peter the eater

Thanks! We're working out the front end design kinks now, but it does work. You can use it. :) Send me a message if you do. Grace (at) FearlessCooking . tv Yes, I do know I'm giving out my email address. So many people are horrified when I do that. :) LOL

This was fun. I wish I had time to talk about a food swap I attend here in Brooklyn every other month or so. They're so much fun.

I'm hoping this challenge will help me to be more consistent over on my own blog. You were all so great to me. Thanks for the support.

Take care friends,

Grace


Grace Piper, host of Fearless Cooking

www.fearlesscooking.tv

My eGullet Blog: What I ate for one week Nov. 2010

Subscribe to my 5 minute video podcast through iTunes, just search for Fearless Cooking

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Before they lock this up, once everything is cooked, try taking out the meat, frying it, and putting it back in the sauce. Adds a whole 'nother level of good stuff!

Makes great sandwiches the next day, too!

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