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sickchangeup

Jean Georges and Nougatine 2009 & Beyond

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If you read the past few pages of the old thread you'll see a few dishes come up over and over and over and over.  Get those.  They're classics for a reason.

I did read through and noticed some of those dishes, skate, scallops, foie etc. They are definitely on my list.

I read upthread that portion sizes are pretty generous, what is the optimum number of courses here assuming I am a normal, by egullet standards, eater. 3 plus desert? two plus desert?


"A man's got to believe in something...I believe I'll have another drink." -W.C. Fields

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If you read the past few pages of the old thread you'll see a few dishes come up over and over and over and over.  Get those.  They're classics for a reason.

I did read through and noticed some of those dishes, skate, scallops, foie etc. They are definitely on my list.

I read upthread that portion sizes are pretty generous, what is the optimum number of courses here assuming I am a normal, by egullet standards, eater. 3 plus desert? two plus desert?

I usually tell any guests dining with us that 2 courses make for a light lunch, 3 for a regular lunch and 4 for a large lunch. Dessert doesn't really factor in the count for me as it's a reduced portion.

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If you read the past few pages of the old thread you'll see a few dishes come up over and over and over and over.  Get those.  They're classics for a reason.

I did read through and noticed some of those dishes, skate, scallops, foie etc. They are definitely on my list.

FYI, they have just changed the jean georges lunch menu over the last couple of days.:I also recommend the madia with muscat grapes, the goat cheese gnocchi, and the asparagus with morels (if it is on the menu).

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I think sethd is referring to madai, a type of fish.

The asparagus with morels is such a classic. Of JG, yes, but, like, of all time, too.

I'm going for their el cheapo dinner menu on Thursday this week. Will be interesting to see if they put a springy dish on the menu. Am really looking forward to spring produce.

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If you read the past few pages of the old thread you'll see a few dishes come up over and over and over and over.  Get those.  They're classics for a reason.

I did read through and noticed some of those dishes, skate, scallops, foie etc. They are definitely on my list.

I read upthread that portion sizes are pretty generous, what is the optimum number of courses here assuming I am a normal, by egullet standards, eater. 3 plus desert? two plus desert?

I usually tell any guests dining with us that 2 courses make for a light lunch, 3 for a regular lunch and 4 for a large lunch. Dessert doesn't really factor in the count for me as it's a reduced portion.

Sickchangeup,

Thanks very much for the advice, thats exactly what i was looking for. I take it that when you referred to "us" you work at Jean Georges?

In any case, very eagerly anticipating my lunch next week.


"A man's got to believe in something...I believe I'll have another drink." -W.C. Fields

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No, not a restaurant worker, by "us" I'm referring to myself and my wife. Given how cheap and how nice (and how easy to book) JG is for weekend brunch, we've invited people for lunch there a few times. They always ask how much to eat, what courses to try etc... I personally love the tuna ribbons, and have only skipped it once, but we try to limit our advice to how many courses to try rather than which to try. The reality is that it's probably easier to recommend what to steer away from on a first visit if you are trying to get a feel for the food, because at least 10 dishes are signature type dishes that you can't go wrong with.

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No, not a restaurant worker, by "us" I'm referring to myself and my wife.  Given how cheap and how nice (and how easy to book) JG is for weekend brunch, we've invited people for lunch there a few times.  They always ask how much to eat, what courses to try etc...  I personally love the tuna ribbons, and have only skipped it once, but we try to limit our advice to how many courses to try rather than which to try.  The reality is that it's probably easier to recommend what to steer away from on a first visit if you are trying to get a feel for the food, because at least 10 dishes are signature type dishes that you can't go wrong with.

Ah, I see.

What are your favorites? What would you recommend for a first timer? Someone upthread mentioned they added a few new things very recently.


"A man's got to believe in something...I believe I'll have another drink." -W.C. Fields

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No, not a restaurant worker, by "us" I'm referring to myself and my wife.  Given how cheap and how nice (and how easy to book) JG is for weekend brunch, we've invited people for lunch there a few times.  They always ask how much to eat, what courses to try etc...  I personally love the tuna ribbons, and have only skipped it once, but we try to limit our advice to how many courses to try rather than which to try.   The reality is that it's probably easier to recommend what to steer away from on a first visit if you are trying to get a feel for the food, because at least 10 dishes are signature type dishes that you can't go wrong with.

Ah, I see.

What are your favorites? What would you recommend for a first timer? Someone upthread mentioned they added a few new things very recently.

The menu is going to be in flux for the next week or so as the bring in their spring menu. On the present menu. My favorites include the asparagus with morels, the madai with muscut grapes, the foie, the lamb, duck, the turbot with chateau chalon sauce....

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No, not a restaurant worker, by "us" I'm referring to myself and my wife.  Given how cheap and how nice (and how easy to book) JG is for weekend brunch, we've invited people for lunch there a few times.  They always ask how much to eat, what courses to try etc...  I personally love the tuna ribbons, and have only skipped it once, but we try to limit our advice to how many courses to try rather than which to try.   The reality is that it's probably easier to recommend what to steer away from on a first visit if you are trying to get a feel for the food, because at least 10 dishes are signature type dishes that you can't go wrong with.

Ah, I see.

What are your favorites? What would you recommend for a first timer? Someone upthread mentioned they added a few new things very recently.

The menu is going to be in flux for the next week or so as the bring in their spring menu. On the present menu. My favorites include the asparagus with morels, the madai with muscut grapes, the foie, the lamb, duck, the turbot with chateau chalon sauce....

Not to be a pedant, but I believe the turbot is at dinner, skate at lunch.

Also: duck? Is that the Duck "a la JoJo?" How is it prepared?


“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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I would think the signature stuff is the best to try the first time, stuff like:

Egg Caviar

Tuna Ribbons

Foie Gras Brulee

Young Garlic Soup

Turbot/Skate with Chateau Chalon

Red Snapper with Nuts/Seeds & Sweet & Sour

Black Cod with Honshimeji & Lemongrass

Parmesan Crusted Chicken

Sweetbreads

Shortribs

I personally prefer all the stuff listed before the meat courses.

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I would think the signature stuff is the best to try the first time, stuff like:

Egg Caviar

Tuna Ribbons

Foie Gras Brulee

Young Garlic Soup

Turbot/Skate with Chateau Chalon

Red Snapper with Nuts/Seeds & Sweet & Sour

Black Cod with Honshimeji & Lemongrass

Parmesan Crusted Chicken

Sweetbreads

Shortribs

And the scallop with cauliflower/raisin/caper.

Christopher

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I would think the signature stuff is the best to try the first time, stuff like:

Egg Caviar

Tuna Ribbons

Foie Gras Brulee

Young Garlic Soup

Turbot/Skate with Chateau Chalon

Red Snapper with Nuts/Seeds & Sweet & Sour

Black Cod with Honshimeji & Lemongrass

Parmesan Crusted Chicken

Sweetbreads

Shortribs

And the scallop with cauliflower/raisin/caper.

Christopher

And the aforementioned asparagus with morels.

Is it just me or was that squab with lemon confit and foie a classic as well? Either way, it was great and I miss it.


“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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I don't feel like the egg caviar is worth the supplement, but then again I'm more price sensitive than some. When I'm getting a cheap lunch, I want it to be a cheap lunch, you know.

The scallop dish is a classic, yes, but I have a couple issues with it actually. If it carries a supplement, again, I wouldn't get it. Not worth it. Secondly, it's likely you've had a dish a lot like it before. Sure, one could argue the JG pretty much put this flavor combination on the map, but, to me, it's over done. Furthermore, I've found the execution of this dish to be sloppy. The scallop is neither delicately cooked nor do they put a hard sear on it. In my mind, go one or the other. Also, the saucing is sloppily applied to the plate. Probably this is on purpose, but aesthetically I don't think it's a great looking dish.

The tuna ribbons, another classic, but similar, again, to other things you may have had. It's totally delicious, but the arctic char (I think that's the fish) raw preparation, with the trout roe and lemon, while perhaps not as fundamentally tasty is a hell of a lot more interesting to eat, to me.

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Thanks for all the input everyone, very helpful.


"A man's got to believe in something...I believe I'll have another drink." -W.C. Fields

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Also: duck?  Is that the Duck "a la JoJo?"  How is it prepared?

Sorry, the skate is only at lunch. The duck crusted with almonds, sauteed foie, is only at dinner as well. My apologies.

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Also: duck?  Is that the Duck "a la JoJo?"  How is it prepared?

Sorry, the skate is only at lunch. The duck crusted with almonds, sauteed foie, is only at dinner as well. My apologies.

I originally posted that the skate was turbot at dinner, but that's been said and I can't figure out how to delete a post. So, as not to be totally redundant, I'll add to everything else the smoked squab a l'orange as one of my favorites. It may not be a "signature" but it's a great, great dish.

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And the scallop with cauliflower/raisin/caper.

Christopher

meh. Not worth the lunchtime supplement IMO.

Totally agreed. Good but not worth a supplement.


Michael aka "Pan

 

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n.b. The immediately preceding iteration of shrimp (Seared Gulf Shrimp, Silky Pumpkin, Ginger and Basil) expired as of the day before yesterday. I was offered the current incarnation, which had not been printed on that day's (lunch) menu.

Steamed shrimp (dotted with wasabi) with chanterais melon balls. A tepid carrot broth, with a touch of lime is poured over the carousel of crustacea tableside. I'm giving this one a green light (with the caveat that I, personally, would have liked a touch more wasabi).

Also, a new iteration of peeky toe crab is on the lunch menu. Off went the dumplings and in came a cold crab salad laced with an aggressively lip-tingling mustard emulsion. I can easily see how this dish may need to be calibrated to suit a wider audience. I, however, enjoy a good kick in the nose and mouth. I loved it. I can see how more timid tongues might be put out.

Full report later.

*COMP DISCLOSURE* The pastry chef generously sent out more desserts than I could count. I think we managed to cover every square inch of our linen-lined top with saccharin. I could have swam the Atlantic that afternoon.


Edited by ulterior epicure (log)

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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I'm gonna keep up my tradition of posting barely legible menus:

gallery_61507_6225_133746.jpg

This really is an exciting time of year to be visiting restaurants. The kitchen today was SUPER on point, every dish was flawless - I wonder if cracking into a new season juices up a kitchen staff? I'm really starting to appreciate the sea trout dish, I actually missed it about a week back and booked this lunch just to eat it again. The transient tartness of the lemon foam, the fattiness of the fish, the crunch of the fish skin, the ever slight heat of the horseradish and finally the enduring saltiness of the eggs. Incredibly enjoyable micro-progression.

Unfortunately with the seasons, sometimes you lose an old friend. The halibut with honshimeji and lemongrass consume is off the menu, leading to some sadness as we contemplated how long we'll be without it.

UE captured a few of these dishes last weekend, but I didn't see the pea soup on there. It's a really nice presentation, you receive a large bowl with a big cloud of parmesan foam in the middle. The soup gets poured over the foam, and you see croutons getting knocked about as the two meld. Really nice mixture, visually and flavor wise.

Is it reasonable to expect the morels & asparagus to transition to the lunch menu at any point this season?

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Is it reasonable to expect the morels & asparagus to transition to the lunch menu at any point this season?

Yes!! It has been on the lunch menu the last couple of years. I had it for dinner last week. Like baseball, one of the signs that spring is here!!!

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This really is an exciting time of year to be visiting restaurants.  The kitchen today was SUPER on point, every dish was flawless - I wonder if cracking into a new season juices up a kitchen staff? 

Johnny was emoting to my guests and me about the turning seasons. Winter seemed particularly difficult on him. He said, with an elfish grin, that spring is making his "ears sprout."


“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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I eat at Jean Georges with some frequency and therefore feel pretty comfortable with the menu and experience. It's been at least a couple years, however, since I was last there for dinner. Lunch has always been such a great value and my schedule always allowed me to come in at least several times a year. With the introduction of the $58 chef's selections menu, however, a dinner visit was in order. Pretty much an excuse to have a nice, relaxed dinner with the family for a more than reasonable tariff.

Two of us ordered the $58 menu and one ordered the normal $98 prix fixe. I'm not sure the normal menu is $40 better than the special menu, but we appreciated being able to try a few new and different dishes. The restaurant also accommodated one diner in my party who preferred not to eat the veal main course this evening and instead suggested an arctic char dish as a non-meat alternative. All in we spent $120 per person after tax and tip with light drinking. That's a good value at a formal three-star restaurant and a great value at a four-star one.

I was actually slated to go a couple weeks ago but some schedule snafus pushed this meal back. This worked out for the better, as the menu is, as sickchangeup posted, really getting into spring mode. The spring $58 menu is, to me, more appealing than the winter version that was served up until last week or so.

Amuse bouche are the same regardless of which menu you select. Tonight, hamachi with olive puree, carrot-ginger soup with orange oil, and a potato fritter with a truffle emulsion.

The spring menu currently consists of peekytoe crab with asparagus, halibut with almond milk and chili oil, and veal with artichokes and a parmesan sauce. The dessert is a selection of four offerings culled from various quartets. In our case, the chocolate-caramel pop, chocolate cake, doughnut with prune dipping sauce, and apple soda with lillet foam. Perhaps some fruitier selections would've been better, but not really a huge deal.

Not a single disappointment among these savory dishes, though perhaps the halibut was the weakest of the bunch. To say the almond milk was at first unpleasant would be an overstatement; more accurately, it was very assertive, unmistakably almond-y. I came to like it a lot by the end of the dish, however. If you don't like almonds, however, this is not the dish for you. My only actual problem with this dish is that the ramps that I was so looking forward to were somehow overshadowed by the snowpeas. The crab dish was classic Jean Georges, with a pretty strong hit of wasabi-mustard, as UE noted above. This dish felt very Japanese to us, like a crab sunomo, sour but also a little sweet, with asparagus instead of cucumbers. The veal was a surprise hit. Simply roasted, the sauce was so rich and salty and deep.

On the normal prix fixe, I selected the madai with muscat grapes and buttermilk emulsion; char-grilled foie gras wontons with papaya, passion fruit, and spiced wine; and the almond crusted duck breast with amaretto sauce. This last plate is where you see the difference between the $58 menu/lunch and the full-on dinner experience. This was a serious array of food: a whole duck breast, carved tableside, along with a small slice of seared foie, some turnips and crispy potato slices, and a (somewhat forgettable) pile of frisee and hedgehog mushrooms. The duck was not the most tender nor the richest--there is certainly better duck in France and even in this city--but the candied nature of the crust and the sauce made the dish. Can't go wrong with foie either.

The madai and the foie wontons, taken together, were a study in the range of this restaurant's cooking. The raw fish dish was understated, almost overly so, but there was a really pleasing, almost intellectual, interplay between the buttery fish, tangy dressing, bitter micro-herbs, and sweet grapes. The wontons, on the other hand, were bold and brash. This was the first time I'd tried this dish and it was the highlight of the night. The fruit and wine and slightly charred foie were quite memorable. I just wish the wonton wrappers were thinner and didn't stick together ever-so-slightly. Still, an excellent dish.

Service was spot on throughout the night. We got out of there in just over two hours, about perfect. Our severs were not overly chatty but there when we needed them to be. One of the city's top tables to be sure.


Edited by BryanZ (log)

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