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Approaching cooking from taste/flavor research?


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I was wondering if anyone could recommend any texts that approach cooking from the perspective of taste. That is, how does one go about pairing flavors? Why do certain ingredients work together? Which do and which don't?

Id like to get an idea of the 'why' behind recipes, if that makes sense.

What about the Flavor Bible? or Kime's Exploring Taste & Flavour?

Thanks.

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I was wondering if anyone could recommend any texts that approach cooking from the perspective of taste.  That is, how does one go about pairing flavors? Why do certain ingredients work together? Which do and which don't?

Id like to get an idea of the 'why' behind recipes, if that makes sense.

What about the Flavor Bible? or Kime's Exploring Taste & Flavour?

Thanks.

There's a few more along those lines - Sybil Kapoor (Taste, I think), Gray Kunz (Elements of taste?) and one by Rocco diSpirito (really! - it's actually not bad).

Sorry for the rushed off the top of my head answer. I've seen the Kapoor book on remainder tables for next to nothing. Maybe Rocco's book as well.

Cheers,

Geoff

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You might check out the FoodPairing website. I'd also second the recommendation for Culinary Artistry.

Certainly there will be cultural differences. However, if you take a certain cuisine it is built up out of combinations of flavors. I was just curious as to whether any 'cookbooks' approached it this way.

Thanks for the responses so far, and Happy Holidays.

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I'd second Tom Kime's "Exploring Taste and Flavour" that looks at balancing hot, sour, salty, and sweet in Eastern (predominately Thai) cooking. However, the flavor balancing principles are not restricted to Asian food: when tasting during cooking I always ask myself if these flavors are balanced and adjust seasonings accordingly if they are not.

Kime was previously a protege of David Thompson (author of Thai Food and chef at one-Michelin starred Nahm in London). His approach to food shows a strong influence of Thompson's approach.

"In late 2005 Exploring Taste and Flavour was awarded the prize of “Best first cook book in Britain 2005” by the World Gourmand Awards. In March 2006 Exploring Taste and Flavour was nominated as a finalist in the Chef and Restaurant category in the International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) awards in the United States." (this information from http://www.tomkimechef.com)

Amazon link is:

http://www.amazon.com/Exploring-Taste-Flav.../dp/1856267288/

When you are doing your research, don't forget that research shows that flavor is also strongly mediated by mouth feel (texture) as well as visual and auditory cues. :wink:

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

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  • 2 weeks later...
I'd second Tom Kime's "Exploring Taste and Flavour" that looks at balancing hot, sour, salty, and sweet in Eastern (predominately Thai) cooking. However, the flavor balancing principles are not restricted to Asian food: when tasting during cooking I always ask myself if these flavors are balanced and adjust seasonings accordingly if they are not.

Kime was previously a protege of David Thompson (author of Thai Food and chef at one-Michelin starred Nahm in London). His approach to food shows a strong influence of Thompson's approach.

"In late 2005 Exploring Taste and Flavour was awarded the prize of “Best first cook book in Britain 2005” by the World Gourmand Awards. In March 2006 Exploring Taste and Flavour was nominated as a finalist in the Chef and Restaurant category in the International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) awards in the United States." (this information from http://www.tomkimechef.com)

Amazon link is:

http://www.amazon.com/Exploring-Taste-Flav.../dp/1856267288/

When you are doing your research, don't forget that research shows that flavor is also strongly mediated by mouth feel (texture) as well as visual and auditory cues.  :wink:

I studied this book side by side with Rocco's book since they both seemed to be trying to do the same thing, and I thought the Rocco book was hands down superior in almost every way. But, with Rocco's reputation, nobody wants to admit that.

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A couple more for ya.

The Improvisational Cook by Sally Schneider

Baking By Flavor Lisa Yockelson

Dan

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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  • 4 weeks later...

There's a few more along those lines - Sybil Kapoor (Taste, I think), Gray Kunz (Elements of taste?) and one by Rocco diSpirito (really! - it's actually not bad).

I've seen the Kapoor book on remainder tables for next to nothing. Maybe Rocco's book as well.

Where have you seen Kapoor's Taste book at that price? It sounds interesting and something I'd like to see, but I haven't even seen it in bookstores, not even at full retail.

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How to cook without recipes by Glynn Christian - looks at pairing flavours / flavour affinity and flavour trails - which is how to link diferent flavours on a plate. Starts off with a quick intro to the tatsebuds and te flavours they can detect. An interesting read.

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