Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Robuchon Method for Fries


Recommended Posts

In another thread it was suggested that someone start a new topic re the seductively easy method reported by Jeffery Steingarten as being the cook-at-home technique used by Joel Robuchon. It's simple...cut the fries...put in enough room temp oil to cover them...heat till browned ~365ish. Takes about 5-7 min depending on pan size and uses very little oil.

I've fooled with it and it works well with fries that are less than steak fries in thickness. Russett potatoes worked better than yukon gold (which I wouldn't use for fries anyway). They weren't greasy and were crisp outside and just right inside.

Anybody have thoughts about this?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have only used one layer of fries with the pan uncovered.

I suppose you could use more layers and more oil so long as it doesn't bubble over (which BTW happens less with this method than the standard one).

I've only done tests in smaller pans...with so little oil it heats pretty quickly. I'd be afraid to keep it covered.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would definately keep it uncovered. Once they start frying and giving off steam, a cover will give the steam a place to collect and then drip back into the oil, with annoying results.. :biggrin:

  • Like 1

"It's better to burn out than to fade away"-Neil Young

"I think I hear a dingo eating your baby"-Bart Simpson

Link to post
Share on other sites
I have used this method with success. I seem to remember that the size of the potato sticks matters.

How big/small do they have to be?

I have tried it with a range of sizes from big slabs to McDonald's sized cuts. The smaller fries worked best...sized up to 3/8". Bigger fires weren't as nice inside, but that could be due to my taking the fries out at 360 deg as specified by Steingarten's article. Another 10 or 15 deg might do the trick.

I also haven't tried sweet potatoes (yet).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Two experiments today.

Russet thickness >3/8 " doesnt taste as good even if left in to 375deg. I have not tried slow heating of the oil though. My method for all of the "studies" has been to use a 8" pan and a hot burner. Fries cook in <5 minutes. Pretty darn instant gratification.

Sweet potatoes (the orange kind) cook even quicker. Thicker than 3/8" sweet potatoes still cook well, though the best ones are 1/4".

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

One potato, 3/8" cut, two layers, 8" diameter 4 qt sauce pan, medium high heat. I took 21 minutes to reach temp and to brown the potatoes.

They were delicious. They did absorb some oil, but my they were wonderful.

Does one layer at high heat really finish in 8 minutes???

Tim

Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi,

One potato, 3/8" cut, two layers, 8" diameter 4 qt sauce pan, medium high heat.  I took 21 minutes to reach temp and to brown the potatoes. 

They were delicious.  They did absorb some oil, but my they were wonderful.

Does one layer at high heat really finish in 8 minutes???

Tim

I've finished in 5 minutes with a small pan and a big flame.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just purely by the photo some of them seem sogged out a bit too much, the two on the right especially and the top of the one in the middle. Could just be the light reflecting on the oil. They don't look dry enough look a bit sogged out in oil to me.

Let me hasten to say thank you so much for going through the technical jig saw puzzle to get the photos to everyone.

Were they saturated at all in oil when you ate them?

So I re-read everything and yes you confirm that they had absorbed oil.

Did you rinse them off in water and dry them before frying? Just curious.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I gave this method a whirl yesterday. I used fries cut from russets, one batch was 5mm, the other 10mm. It took both about 6-8 minutes to cook to a deep golden brown. After draining and salting, we tried them...The verdict?

Not so good. While they were both well cooked, they were quite greasy. Very little crispness. I prefer the two step method, or the easier method, McDonalds...

"It's better to burn out than to fade away"-Neil Young

"I think I hear a dingo eating your baby"-Bart Simpson

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm doing it in a really small pan with a small volume of oil; which probably accounts for the speed. I timed the fries in the above photos...4min 50 sec.

Re greasiness. They are no more greasy than McDs. To me every fry is a bit greasy.

Edited by gfweb (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Few treats are as easily accessible to each of us and are as wonderfully rewarding to make and eat and share as fries. Thank you exponentially so for all the work.

My favorites are the teeny eeny weeny skinny ones nice & crunchy.

Link to post
Share on other sites

HI,

Wikipedia says, "A third method, invented by the celebrated French chef Joël Robuchon for the home cook, is to put the sliced potatoes into a saucepan with just enough cold oil in it to cover the potatoes, then to cook them over high heat until golden, stirring occasionally."

This does not mention rinsing or drying. I will try both methods.

Tim

Link to post
Share on other sites

Recently I snagged a copy of the CIA Cooking at Home (2003) book for $2.77 :smile: and here (paraphrased) is the method suggested in the book:

Russets, (1 1/2 pounds) peeled, rinsed, drained and cut into 3/8" sticks then thoroughly dried. Use large cast iron skillet or wok. Put in the potatoes and oil (2 1/2 cups veg oil) and adjust heat to medium. Cook for 25 mins - don't stir or disturb the spuds except by slight jiggles of the pan on occasion. Adjust to high heat and cook for a further 10-15 minutes (until golden brown) and this time you can stir them a bit.

A side bar suggests that the potatoes cook as the oil heats and that the ultimate temp reached is 350F but notes that this method does not require a thermometer to be fool-proof.

I dunno - what's "medium heat"? I know it's different for each of us depending on our pans, stoves, and subjective judgement! It's also an awfully long time to be heating oil with all the attendant dangers esp. for those of us who have senior moments! :shock:

No mention of Joel Robuchon!

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to post
Share on other sites
...

No mention of Joel Robuchon!

The attribution is anecdotal in Steingarten's book, something along the lines of: "...said to be Joel Robuchons method to make fries at home."

Does anyone have other sources?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...