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Stupid Flour Question: White Lily flour uses


Kim Shook
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I always have at least 2 kinds of flour - White Lily for biscuits and AP for most everything else. I just got a huge bag of White Lily in a gift basket and will never make enough biscuits to use it up before it goes bad (or stale or buggy orwhatever flour does). Here's the dumb part: can I use it for regular baking? Cakes, cookies, quick bread? See a make a LOT more of those than I do biscuits - especially since I discovered Mary B's :blush: . Ta!

Kim

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i wouldn't use it for just any baking. white lily is a cake flour, correct (like swan's down?)? if so, then it should have a much lower protein level than all purpose. it is good for things that don't need a lot of structure...like sponge cake, shortbread, etc. but i wouldn't use it if you're looking for structure because you need the added protein that all purpose flour has.

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Can I substitute White Lily® flour for recipes using other all-purpose flours?

White Lily® can be substituted for other all-purpose flours. However, White Lily Flour is lighter, so more flour must be added. For every cup of flour in a recipe, use 1 cup plus 2 Tablespoons of White Lily Flour. The weight of White Lily Flour will be the same as the weight of other all-purpose flours. Since bags are packaged by weight, you will get the same number of portions from White Lily Flour as other flours.

This is from the White Lily website. I would also recommend maybe using a blend of White Lily and ap flour to get the benefits from both. If you need some structure, but also want lightness or delicateness.

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Thanks so much for the help. I think I will do a little of everything. I'm making 2 loaves of banana bread this weekend and I will also store some in the freezer. And I just did one of those 'gee-I-could-have-had-a-V-8' slaps on my head, alanamoana - I should have checked the website :biggrin: ! Thanks again!

Kim

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I always have at least 2 kinds of flour - White Lily for biscuits and AP for most everything else.  I just got a huge bag of White Lily in a gift basket and will never make enough biscuits to use it up before it goes bad (or stale or buggy orwhatever flour does).  Here's the dumb part:  can I use it for regular baking?  Cakes, cookies, quick bread?  See a make a LOT more of those than I do biscuits - especially since I discovered Mary B's  :blush: .  Ta!

Kim

I use White Lily for cakes with great results. Not quite as light as other cake flours but definitely makes lighter cakes than those made with other all-purpose flours. It's my flour of choice for cakes as its also more affordable than store-brand cake flour. However, it's not as great a choice for cookies or pound cakes as it's a softer wheat flour and may not add enough structure.

Edited by shaloop (log)
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I agree that it is perfect for any type of quick bread, pancakes, scones, cookies - great for gravy.

I wouldn't use it for yeast bread without the addition of a high gluten flour.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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