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Vancouver Restaurant Recommendations


sgschef
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Steve, with regards to local wine, what I suggest is you go to the stores mentioned upthread and find someone at the store who can ask you questions about what you're looking for and find something to suit your tastes. There's also a free magazine with some very basic info on local wine that's available at the liquor board outlets here. Can't remember the title-it's buried in my recycling bag.

If you tell us what your particular wine loves are, we can probably help you out on this thread, but sometimes the best wines are hard to find because the production happens on such a small scale here. Stephen Bonner and kurtisk are a couple of our resident wine experts. Also, ask the servers at the places your eating out at to point you towards some good local wines.

I won't hesitate to reccomend Cru and Aurora. Aurora has fantastic local wines on their menu.

Zuke

"I used to be Snow White, but I drifted."

--Mae West

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If you're planning to go to Shanghai Wind, they are closed on Tuesdays and you will need to call ahead early for reservations.

Wow. reservations? this is very enabling--my wife LOVES plans, so long as they don't interfere with vacation siestas or the 'temple of beauty' which precedes stepping out.

I wonder if I should book straight through for the week :-) ?.

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If you tell us what your particular wine loves are, we can probably help you out on this thread

Ok.

General:

Wines as a rule (ok, there are exceptions), but wines to go with food anyway that are greater than 13 % alcohol and hence balanced with sugar are no-no's--they just give me a headache if I drink more than a glass.

This precludes almost all current CA reds and whites, and also precludes just about all Aussie wines and NZ wines.I've had some interesting OR Pinot Noirs, but at the price point to get something good, there are many other better values from Europe, albeit they wouldn't be Pinot Noirs.

White.

Prefer a paucity of oak, vanilla, pineapple. Prefer whites NOT aged in oak.

For glugging, decent Spanish Rioja such as Marques de Caceres or Marques de Riscal Rueda or say Don Tommaso Pinot Grigio, or at next price level a Loire Valley Sauvignon Blanc (Pouilly Fume), or stepping up the price scale drastically Chateau Carbonnieux white Bordeaux; or fermented in steel appellation controlle Chablis.

Have not enjoyed recent vintage CA chardonnays, CA varietals such as Pinot Grigio, Sauvignon Blanc--although the ones that meet the 'General' guideline above can ok or better.

I have had (and I think this is one of the exceptions) recently a Chilean Sauvignon Blanc from Veramonte (and with a screw top no less) that is pretty good. Its got practically no wood and its 13 % alcohol.

Red.

Detest CA Merlot. Period. Hate it. Its like flabby skin, all body, no taste or dimension beyond depth.

Lately have been enjoying some Spanish reds--Tempranillos from Roija (Solarz--a very old brandy house) but not the thinner lighter bodied ones from Catalunya, reds from old growth Grenache vines, Faustino V and Faustino VII, old reliable Marques de Riscal regular and reserve; some Italians from Sicily (Torresino springs to mind, Salice Salentino as reliable houses); many good values in reds from Langeduoc although transportation costs drive their prices up.

What these reds all have in common is a moderate amount of chew and spice and that they open up within at most 20 minutes and are generally less than $10 USD here in Atlanta.

Rose.

There's some amazing things going on with Rose. We have had (ok, these are 10-20 USD) some great FULL bodied NOT sweet rose's from France and Italy this year. One that springs to mind is Domaine de la Petit Cassagne. In a blind tasting, these have so much body that you might think many of them are reds, not rose.

About these prices.

These are Atlanta prices. Alcohol taxes are on the high side here in Georgia, legacy of the Baptist sin tax now memorialized in the state budget process.

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Sin tax. Sin tax.

The only thing you can get here for less than $10 is utter plonk.

Honest.

Of course there is the dollar differential.

Here is the provincial liquor store website, so you can see how our prices vary for the stuff you know, which might keep you from thinking some of our BC wine is pricey. :smile:

Agenda-free since 1966.

Foodblog: Power, Convection and Lies

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Okay Steve,

I think you're gonna like our wines! Because of our cooler climate, we tend not to have those big alcoholic monsters, which is a blessing IMO.

Some of my faves:

Bubbles: Sumac Ridge Stellar Jay Brut

For fun, try a different white grape variety like Cedar Creek Ehrenfelser or a Kerner

We like wine from a first nations winery in B.C. Nk' Mip (say "inkameep")-try their Pinot Blanc-dry and no oak

For a great rosé try Grey Monk Rotberger- chill it, drink it, kick back and watch the sun set.

A light red grape variety I fell for in Austria-Zweigelt: Try the St. Hubertus Zweigelt

Okay, for good karma, I'm going to recommend my new party wine which is the Geringer Cuvée Noir, at $10.99-what a flippin' BARGAIN. Don't tell anyone or I won't be able to find any anymore!

Couple of helpful websites I just stumbled on gismondionwine.com, and bcwineguys.com.

Ciao,

Zuke

Edited by Zucchini Mama (log)

"I used to be Snow White, but I drifted."

--Mae West

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Okay Steve,

I think you're gonna like our wines! Because of our cooler climate, we tend not to have those big alcoholic monsters, which is a blessing IMO

Terrific.

I know I put up a long reply overloaded with 411 and qualification, but its the dialog I launch in whole or in part depending on receptiveness with sommeliers and the degree to which my wife's eyes glaze over as she patiently hears the same wine routine umpteen times again.

After all, its the sommeliers' job to match their list full of bottles I've never tasted with my own tastes and what I'm eating that night and my preferred price range within their list. Its successful about nine out of ten times, failing only when the sommelier doesn't genuinely listen.

From time to time a sommelier will suggest alternate price points to meet my preference, and most often I am never disappointed following their lead. Having in a prior life run my own small wine list (75 or so bottles), I'm now merely a civilian who doesn't get to taste everything the salesmen and winery missionaries bring in the door like a sommelier does. I'm the one eyed man in the land of the blind, and very much aware of my shortfall.

So speaking from the fount of that experience, you, Mlle. Zuke, appear to have A-1 sommelier potential!

Many thanks.

..............................

And I've taken note that price points will differ from place to place :-)

Edited by Steve Drucker (log)
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speaking of bc wines, how about a little visit out to the 'burbs? we have a few wineries out in langley, two top ones are "township 7", and "domaine de chaberton". we just recently went out there and had a fabulous afternoon/evening. topped off with a lovely french dinner at the baccus bistro (at domaine de chaberton), sitting on the patio, next to the vineyard. their 2004 gewurztraminer just gained an award.

http://www.domainedechaberton.com

btw, i second the suggestion for the templeton for a downtown diner breakfast suggestion.

how about a fun izakaya experience at guu with garlic?

as for thai, my pick would be simply thai, in yaletown. must order the Cho Muang! little purple dumplings of goodness!

Edited by makanmakan (log)

Quentina

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you have a great looking list there but thought i'd bring up an obvious suggestion to add: chambar at 562 Beatty St,(604) 879-7119

they have wonderful seafood and the atmosphere is also fantastic. there are a few threads devoted to this restaurant so you may want to check them out.

also would add another gelato place you may want to add during your travels called dolce amore on commercial drive. if you're out that way i'd recommend trying the reese's gelato...velvety chocolatey peanuty goodness! enjoy your trip to vancouver!

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So speaking from the fount of that experience, you, Mlle. Zuke, appear to have A-1 sommelier potential!

Many thanks.

..............................

And I've taken note that price points will differ from place to place :-)

Merci!, but you must reserve judgement until you've tasted the wine! I was also thinking, that since you probably have some amazing BBQ back home you should bring back a bottle of our local Merridale Cyser-apple cider made with honey. It's just the thing for BBQ pork, and comes in a little plastic bottle that's perfect for travel.

You also asked about Shakespeare in the tent. I haven't seen the shows this year, but it's outdoors, so may be a bit cold this late in the summer. Hope you do get some warm days though.

Zuke

"I used to be Snow White, but I drifted."

--Mae West

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...since you probably have some amazing BBQ back home you should bring back a bottle of our local Merridale Cyser-apple cider made with honey. It's just the thing for BBQ pork,

Atlanta is not the place for BBQ. Period. Don't know why, merely reporting. Best BBQ in 25 years we've had has been from a hut on the GA FL border in the shanty town section of Jasper FL--A&B. Open weekends and only sporadically. One of those end of the rainbow places. Jasper is known primarily as the home of a state prison, not as notorious as Raiford, but just as grim.

But we really like hard cider and fresh unpasteurized cider. Will keep a lookout.

.....................

Also, will keep an eye out for La Frenz Montage. Wish there was time to sojourn at Lake Okanagan, it looks terrific.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 6 months later...

Hi all,

In May I am coming over to Vancouver for a convention and would like some suggestions on where to eat. I live for food and am a big fan of El Bulli/Fat Duck style food, but will eat anything as long as its good.

Any advice on where to visit??

Many thanks

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I suggest you read the threads that compile the suggestions and then let us know what your choices are. Then we can give you feedback on what your choices are.

But if you really want to get some ideas my suggestions for not-to-be missed dining experiences in Vancouver include:

C for the seafood, Rare for the wonderful tasting menu and sheer passion of the staff, Cru for the great food/wine pairing and sheer comfort of the experience, Aurora Bistro because of the focus on local and the neighbourhood feel, West for the amazing food, wine and service, Feenies for the burger, Vij's for the innovative Indian food, Nu for the irreverent take on food and great cocktails, Chambar because of the great food, atmosphere and interesting approaches. My favorite sushi is out of the downtown area - Aji Sai.

As for Asian, it really depends on what you want from the experience. Fun? Shiru Bay, the Guus or Gyoza King. Authentic - check the threads - there are amazing reviews from those who know or just plain inexpensive and good value?

That's a start. Give us your thoughts based on what you read in the thread mentioned by mtigges and we will happily chime in with our opinions. Opinions are cheap and plentiful with this crowd.

Cheers,

Karole

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Many thanks for the advice. I'm goin with a largeish group of people so there is plenty to put to them, I would just have hated to come all the way to Vancouver and not sample what it had to offer. It is the World Federation of Haemophilia's conference held at the V.C.E.C.

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Many thanks for the advice. I'm goin with a largeish group of people so there is plenty to put to them, I would just have hated to come all the way to Vancouver and not sample what it had to offer. It is the World Federation of Haemophilia's conference held at the V.C.E.C.

Matt: If you have a large group of people the chances are that a small percentage will have special dietary needs. Check out our site that was created for people with and without those needs.

www.foodvancouver.com

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  • 1 year later...

I'm in Vancouver for a short stay in October and would appreciate a steer as to where I might eat out to get a sense of the best the city offers. Much enjoyed reading the boards, but there's so much choice. I'd be particularly (but not exclusively) tempted towards a Chinese meal but much of the recent discussion on that thread has focused on dim sum - where should I try for dinner ?

Much appreciated (and happy to return the recommendation favour if folks are ever visiting London !)

Gareth

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Depending on when you're here in October, and on whether it's on, Parkside will hopefully repeat its singularly extraordinary game and wild mushroom festival that it debuted last fall.

Here's a link to last year's menu:

http://www.parksiderestaurant.ca/wildgame.html

Festival or not, it's a consistently excellent choice.

I would second this recommendation!

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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