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Oven-dried tomatoes....


KARENR65
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I generally freeze my dehydrated tomatoes, and try to use them up within six months, but that's a quality issue for me.

I would think you would get at least three or four months packed in oil in the fridge, but I am not a food safety expert.

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Yeah, as long as they're kept covered with the oil, and you don't use your fingers to remove them from the jar, they should keep a couple of months at least...the oil makes a damn nice vinaigrette too.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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Thanks for the replies. My parents have an overabundance of tomatoes so I trying to think of things to do with them. The storing of them in oil had me concerned because I know that it is a problem when storing garlic in oil (right?)

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Thanks for the replies. My parents have an overabundance of tomatoes so I trying to think of things to do with them.  The storing of them in oil had me concerned because I know that it is a problem when storing garlic in oil (right?)

Yeah, I think garlic is a botulism concern. Sugar content I think.

Sounds like a great infusion in oil.

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Botulism is a concern when dealing with any plant based food left at room temperature. Botulism bacteria are present in soil, and anything grown in soil has a chance of picking up some spores. Given an anaerobic environment, adequate nutrients, and sufficiently high temperature these spores will grow into full bacteria and begin producing the deadly toxin. This is why garlic infused oils are at risk. The bacteria will not produce the toxin at refrigerator temperatures, and cannot tolerate certain levels of acidity/sugar. As weinoo said, as long as you keep them packed in oil they should keep a long time. I would only worry about them if they start to smell funny or look moldy; as long as they are kept refrigerated botulism isn't a concern.

Edited by Gabriel Lewis (log)
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"Flavored olive oils and dressings make great gifts but watch out; there are safe and unsafe ways to make flavored olive oil. The unsafe way is to put anything in the oil that contains water. That would include garlic, lemon peel, fresh peppers, fresh herbs and spices. The oil will not support bacterial growth but the water containing herbs will. Botulism bacteria can grow in this type of environment. There are several ways to get around this"

Source: http://www.oliveoilsource.com/flavoring_olive_oils.htm

Funny you should bring this up. I just saw Alton Browns latest episode of Good Eats. Withering Bites is the title. The show was about dehydrating fruit. Tomatoes are berries when you get right down to it.

I've practically all but given up on store bought tomatos in favor of canned. Man once you have had homegrown tomatos you are scared for life. I envy you.

If I had more energy I might consider canning them myself. Well energy, canning supplies and of course the tomatoes anyway.

"And in the meantime, listen to your appetite and play with your food."

Alton Brown, Good Eats

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More on tomatoes from Mr. Alton Brown:

" Now when you get them home, don't keep them in direct sunlight, okay, no matter how pretty they look. Oh, and never put them in the refrigerator, okay? If they drop below 50 degrees a flavor compound called (Z)-3-dexenal is just going to flip itself off like a chemical switch ... permanently."

"And in the meantime, listen to your appetite and play with your food."

Alton Brown, Good Eats

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