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Found 434 results

  1. Chris Hennes

    Spiced Orange Salami

    I had dinner last night at a restaurant whose charcuterie plate had, among other selections, something they just called "spiced orange": it was a relatively homogeneous pork salume with little visible fat, and a really interesting herbal note to it. Is anyone aware of a precedent for this type of salami, and does anyone have a recipe for something that might fit this description?
  2. nolnacs

    Need some ideas for lomo

    I'd like to try my hand at making lomo. Does anyone here have suggestions for seasoning percentages or quantities? From what I have seen online, garlic and smoked paprika are common seasonings, but is there anything else I should be considering?
  3. Kent Wang reported on his visit to Austin's First Annual Texas Barbeque Festival here. The theme was Texas sausages. Oddly enough, I searched and didn't find a topic that focuses on a Texas culinary tradition. I did start a topic a couple of years ago on Hot Links but that discussion is just on one specific version of this large and varied subject. A lot of folks may not realize that Texas has benefitted from a large scale immigration from Germany, Czechoslovakia and other similar European cultures in the early and later 19th century. Texas was sparsely populated and immigration was encouraged, first by the Mexican government, then the Republic of Texas and finally the US. That need for settlers coincided with economic and political difficulties in Europe so we received their rich culinary traditions. Sausages were a big part of that. Beef was predominate earlier on but pigs, sometimes wild, were available as well. Then you had to do something with the venison that Cousin Harry shot. In recent years, football heroes, country singers and just about everyone's uncle have gotten into the act. Some of these companies have grown into sizeable businesses. Then, even more recently, sausages have taken "creative" turns. (I suspect a California Contamination Syndrome. ) But, there are some really interesting varieties popping up. Along the way, we enthusiastically adopted sausage making traditions from our Italian contingent and from our Mexican friends to the south of the border. You can find some mighty fine versions of sweet and hot Italian sausages pretty commonly. Mexican chorizo is rampant and mostly very good. It has its own personality versus Spanish chorizo. A breakfast taco with chorizo crumbles is a homegrown treat as far as I can tell but has spread pretty widely. We need a place to discuss these treasures, and maybe disappointments, so here it is. I like to make note of several aspects of the sausage: ingredients, seasoning, texture, casing, and lets not forget methods of cooking. History and origins, if known are always interesting. Read. Chew. Discuss.
  4. scott123

    Confit Geography

    I've been thinking about confit lately and how the duck begins surrounded by fat, but, over time, it releases it own juices so that the top of the pot is always cooking in fat, but the very bottom layer, to an extent, stews in it's own juices. Has anyone noticed the bottom layer, the layer below the water line, tasting any different from the top? Anyone notice a difference in texture?
  5. i just had some for the first time and i can say that it's the best stuff i've had this side of the atlantic. rustic flavors, plenty of fat, and NO HEAT. i hate the heat i get from the additives in most dried salame. looking forward to trying some of the other products in moderation as they can be costly (no implication that i believe it to be overpriced) http://store.framani.com/index.html
  6. Erich vG

    Salumi Questions...

    Hey Y'all- I've been very successful at making tesa (flat pancetta) and various fermented, moulded salamis for our restaurant, but have a couple of questions regarding whole-muscle cuts, (think culatello, lomo, speck, etc.) 1. For the coppa and lomo I have curing/hanging presently, I have used a 5% salt to raw weight ratio. If the initial cure is done in plastic bags, will this be about right? I know that prosciutti require 6%, but I figured that since they are allowed to "drip" and contain the bone, then 5% should be about right for boneless, "wet-cured" cuts. 2. The FDA requires 200 ppm nitrite in dry cured meat products. Cure #1 is 6.25% nitrite by weight, so the calculation for nitrite addition is easy, but the #2 cure I am using, (from Butcher & Packer), is 5.67% nitrite and 3.63% nitrate. Should I calculate for a nitrite value to equal 200 ppm, or should I just assume that over the hanging time the nitrate will be degraded into the appropriate level of nitrite? 3. Culatello is called the "heart of the prosciutto". Am I to assume that this is a single-muscle cut containing only the pork top round, or is it "harvested" including other muscles? 4. Which muscles/muscle groups are used to produce real Südtirol-style Speck? 5. Where the hell does one find hog bladders!!?? Thanks in advance for your input, you'll see a lot more of me around here.... Erich
  7. HI, Are there any mail order sources for Chourico or Linguica other than Gaspars? Tim
  8. RichyRich

    Bacon With A Major Attitude

    Still bothered from last night. I am writing to you all for your opinion. Was at a very popular BBQ place in Brooklyn (will leave nameless for now) that sells meat by the pound. In addition to my brisket and pork belly order, I ordered a 1/2 pound of raw house-cured bacon. I have ordered this before and loved, loved, loved it. On my last order of the bacon, they sliced the meat long and thick, ala Peter Luger's (fried up, it was unreal). Now this time, the BBQ slicer/counter guy called the back of the house guy and summoned the bacon. It weighed 1lb so he cut the rectangle in half, making 2 squares, one of which was supposed to be mine. Well, who orders a 4"x5" block of raw BACON that when sliced up and cooked would be nothing more than niblets. Still wanting the goodness I acquiesced and watched as he began to wrap the block unsliced. I said "Bud, could you slice that?" He said "NO" straight out. I was like WTF, are you F-ing kidding me? The bacon sells for $10.50 a pound, which to me is a price that warrants slicing if I so choose. My favorite butcher, Fiacco's in Brooklyn, charges $5.99 a pound and we all know the Oscar Meyer stuff is $3-$5 a pound. Back to the counter guy, so after he said "NO" he said "Why, you can't slice it yourself," to which I replied "No, for the price I would like it sliced." He said, "Can't do it." I said, "Don't want it." I ate my cue, which was amazing, but was bothered by the attitude and still am. Shouldn't the paying customer have a legitimate say? Am I way off here people? What's up with these BROOKLYNY HIPSTER attitudes? FYI: I will attempt a bacon purchase again and will preface my wants and needs. Sad I didn't have it this AM when I woke up.
  9. faronem

    Too long of a salt cure

    I'm sure this matter has been discussed in part or whole somewhere on egullet, but after 20 minutes of various searches I sure can't find it! ]So, thanks for a pointer if you know of a previous thread. In short, I recently cut down a coppa I made and the end product ended up having too salty a taste. I've made this recipe several times with great success. This time, I'm positive the extra saltiness has to do with the fact that, due to an personal emergency, it had to spend too much time in the salt cure before it was hung (as in over a week extra). This raises a few questions for me about procedures and troubleshooting. 1. First, obviously, any suggestions for an after-the-fact how to rectify this too-salty coppa? Of course, I could chop it up and mix it into some sort of cooked dishes, but in this case, I'm specifically curious about ideas to rescue it to make it more palatable to eat on it's own. I'm open to experimentation. 2. Given that I knew that it had spent too long in the cure, what would have you advised that I had done previous to air curing? I gave it a good vinegar and water washing and about a 1 hour cold water bath before hanging. 3. Can a too-salty result be the result of too much salt in the cure? I wouldn't think so, but now I'm curious. It's been my experience that the amount of salt is less of an issue than the length of time it spends curing. I've always relied on visual cues and firmness. Thanks for any ideas.
  10. scott123

    Crisp Oven Bacon Quest

    I have been combing through this forum's handful of long bacon threads looking for any leads on producing really crisp oven bacon. Besides baking on a rack (which I despise washing), has anyone found a way to do this? My goal is bacon that shatters to the firm touch but is still relatively uncolored (tan/red not brown). I've gotten it a few times in the past but haven't been able to reproduce it lately. When I have been successful, it's been with low temperatures (<250 f.) for a long time (2+ hours) but these days that formula is giving me bacon that's dark brown and chewy (can't even cut it with fork!). Any ideas?
  11. snowangel

    Bacon Gougeres

    So, the former long-hair (aka Peter) has requested these for Super Bowl Sunday. Suggestions for add-ins besides bacon? Or, add-ins instead of bacon! ETA: How well do these freeze for a couple of days, or do they hold well without freezing?
  12. rarerollingobject

    Lardo in Sydney?

    Looking for a source of lardo, which is Italian cured pork fatback, essentially. Anyone?? Thanks
  13. I've recently been reading (well, skipping around) my copy of Ruhlman & Polcyn's Charcuterie. My interest is primarily in dry cured products like prosciutto or bresaola. So I'd like to start a thread specifically about these variants. As my plans for building a curing chamber (and a proper place for it) take a back seat to other pressing home renovations, I'm in a kind of limbo between consumer and producer/both. But my imagination goes on and I keep finding new questions - among these are: 1) Commercial prosciutto: I've been doing taste tests with various super/specialty market prosciuttos and have found less differentiation than I would've expected. Even between a Walmart Del Duca and a Boar's Head imported Prosciutto di Parma, The Parma did take the edge in the judging, but not but not at a premium of $10/pound. Is actual prosciutto bought in Itally better? 2) The book Charcuterie seems to stop at describing the procedure for specfic things, That's fine, but what if I want to do something different (e,g, treat a pork loin as a breasaola)? Could science create a prosciutto in a shorter time by cutting it down into smaller pieces?
  14. rlibkind

    Lamb Bacon

    I couldn't find a topic dedicated to lamb bacon in a quick search, so here goes . . . I ordered two lamb breasts from one of my Reading Terminal Market butchers in Philadelphia, and for less than $16 got two breasts with the bones removed (reserved for scotch broth or grilled riblets for nibbling - there's still a little meat left). I followed the simple recipe from Mark Bittman's blog (contributed by Danny Meyer, from a recipe from his colleague Brian Mayer; you can find it here). It's two cups salt, one cup sugar, coat the meat, wrap and let it sit in the fridge for 2-4 days until firm. (Mine took four.) Then roast at 250F until you hit internal temp of 140F. I failed to correct for my inaccurate oven, so I overcooked a bit and didn't pull the breasts until they hit 180F. But they were still delicious. Here are the before and after cooking photos:
  15. Hello I've got a glut of lamb to use up and im after a good recipe for a lamb sausage. If possible, I want to avoid having to add pork fat. Open to any ideas just as long as its good! Many thanks
  16. scott123

    Homemade Andouille

    It's official. I do NOT like kielbasa as a sub for andouille in gumbo. NOT at all. The whole coriander hot dog note drives me bonkers. At around $2.50 a lb. it's a shame I can't work with it. I can get okay andouille, but it costs me around $8/lb. It's my favorite part of gumbo but that's a little too rich for my blood. As I can get pork butt for practically nothing, I've been considering making my own. Anyone make their own andouille? What do you think about this andouille recipe? Any tips/tricks you'd recommend?
  17. Richard Kilgore

    Tomato Confit

    I have a surplus of roma tomatoes and want to make tomato confit. Any suggestions for what to add to the crock pot...other than the tomatoes, salt and olive oil? Maybe a sprig of rosemary?
  18. It's probably the combination of the frigid weather, the bag of new-crop lentilles de Puy in my cupboard and the bottle of Madiran (Château d'Aydie '95, which should be hitting its stride about now) in my drink-soon queue, but I've suddenly developed a major hankering for one of my favourite winter combo, duck confit with warm lentil salad. The problem is the duck. Back in the good old days, Boucherie de Paris, the little butcher's shop on Gatineau across from the former HEC building, sold the best confit de carnard I've ever tasted anywhere. After a quarter hour in a hot oven, it would emerge all golden and crispy-skinned and falling-off-the-bone tender. The meat had a texture somewhere between unctuous and silky and a mild yet deep, dark flavour with salt and fat in perfect balance. Had he done nothing else, then-butcher André Philippot would have earned my eternal gratitude for this triumph of gastronomy. (In fact, he did much more. I first learned of the shop when Bee McGuire proclaimed it the winner of the Gazoo's toulouseathon, its search for the Montreal's best toulouse sausage. André's terrines were also works of art.) Alas, the Philippots sold their shop a decade or so ago and retired who knows where. And while the new owner does some things as good or better, confit isn't one of them. (Neither are the toulouses; I suspect the main problem is his decision to cut back on salt and fat in deference to les goûts modernes, as he once put it.) It's not that his confit is bad, it's that it's not great. So, finally getting around to my question, who in your opinion now makes the best duck confit in the city? Although I'm mainly interested in retail outlets, please feel free to mention any restos that do a bang-up job. Thanks!
  19. thirtyoneknots

    Confit Safety

    While I'm a frequent participant in the Cocktail forum here, I would normally describe my participation in the rest of eGullet as "dedicated lurking". The issue at hand, however, is of such import that I figured it would be best to ask a direct question rather than rely on the indirect information on the subject I have uncovered. Recently I became slightly obsessed with making confit. Duck legs and lamb shanks are both in the queue, but I have already completed projects with chicken legs (in a mix of shmalz and home-rendered lard) as a way to explore the concept on a budget, and pork shoulder in lard as another cheap way to experiment and broaden my horizons with the technique. I also began getting into sausage making around the same time and have since read much about canning and so as you might expect I've had a lot of recent exposure to information and warnings about botulism. The warnings on things like confit have been relatively oblique, however. My fiancee and I are planning to make gift baskets for friends and family containing a variety of homemade food items and pork confit was to be part of this ensemble due to its low cost of production and high level of deliciousness. But while I'm cavalier about health risks to myself at times the last thing I want to do is give my friends and family botulism. The fabulous duck confit thread gives cursory info on canning of confit, implying that it can then be stored at room temperature. As I have read that pressure canning has an adverse effect on confitted meat, I assume that a stronger (ie saltier) cure is in order if one plans to do something like this. My plan is merely to allow the meat to be stored in the long term at refrigerator temperatures, but this seems like it would be an ideal environment for botulism development, particularly in recipes with garlic and/or onions. I admit that Ms. Wolfert's recommendation of 22 g of salt/lb of (bone-in?) meat is far more than I have used in either of my initial attempts (ok, I didn't measure with any sort if precision on the first go 'round). Is this the safe amount of salt to use in the cure to prevent the growth of botulism? Does a longer cure time help? Am I obsessing over nothing? There don't really seem to be any reports of people getting sick from confit, but it is hardly a kitchen staple in the English-speaking world so that doesn't rule anything out. Anyone have any good information about this? -Andy
  20. torakris

    Boudin sausages

    I attempted to make boudin sausages last night even though I have neither seen nor eaten them before... The intro to the recipe just sounded so good! However they exploded on me, into a huge puffy mass. They still tasted quite good but what did I do wrong? Should I have stuffed them into the casings a little bit looser? Did I steam them over two high a heat? I used medium and cooked them on metal steamer with many small holes. Is the pork mixture always cooked before stuffing? I used quite a bit of fat, actually more than the recipe called for but they were still on the dry side.... The recipe called for the cooked meat to be ground with the attachment with 1/4 inch holes, but it turned out quite smooth like cheap tuna fish. Are there supposed to be no chunks in it?
  21. cjsadler

    Vongerichten's Apple Confit

    It involves 15 apples and a 6 hour cooking time-- looks intriguing. However, I remember reading somewhere here on eGullet that there's something seriously wrong with this recipe. Besides being in the Jean-Georges collaboration with Mark Bittman, the recipe is also now in that new Bittman vs. the Chefs book.
  22. I'm looking for some really good, local smokehouse type bacon, preferably applewood smoked. I've tried some local brands but haven't found what I'm looking for. North of Seattle is also good, if there's anything there. Any suggestions?
  23. silverfux

    Help with our charcuterie

    Hi! i am working at a restaurant in south africa where we are curing our own meet. We are having a problem with tiny little white bugs (they look almost like lice) that are inside our leg hams. Does anyone know what they are and how we should get rid of them. the picture attached is the damage they have done on one of our legs.
  24. Pasta con Broccoli Rabe, Pancetta e Pignolia Serves 6 as Main Dish. This is what I made for the eGullet pasta feast in Raleigh, NC, on 2/7/04: Ingredients 2 bunches Broccoli Rabe 1/2 head of garlic, peeled and chopped 1/4 c. olive oil, plus more as needed 1 tsp. crushed red chile 1/4 c. pine nuts 1/4 lb. pancetta Aged Asiago cheese 1. Make or procure some flat, wide-ish pasta, whatever you like. 2. Toast pine nuts in 400 degree oven or in dry skillet, taking care not to burn. 3. Crisp pancetta and set aside to cool, then crumble. 4. Blanch broccoli rabe, squeeze out excess liquid, and chop coarsely. Mince larger stems. 5. Heat olive oil over low to medium heat, add chopped garlic and saute until garlic looks cooked through but not brown. 6. Have pasta almost ready at this point, i.e. about 2 minutes more cooking time. 7. Put chopped rabe in saute pan, mix with garlic and add crushed chiles. When pasta is cooked through, drain and add to pan. Mix thoroughly. 8. Plate pasta, garnish with toasted pine nuts and crumbled pancetta, and grate asiago on top. Drizzle with EVOO, if desired. Yum! Keywords: Main Dish, Italian, Appetizer, Dinner, Intermediate, Vegetables ( RG864 )
  25. Rory Hart

    Curing Salmon in a Ziploc bag

    I am following the directions in Ruhlman and Polcyn's Charcuterie for the fennel cured salmon and am wondering if it is okay to cure the salmon in a ziploc bag. I regularly use ziplocs to cure bacon so I'm thinking there probably isn't any issue. They talk about using foil but that seems less convenient and I can get most of the air out of a ziploc so the cure covers the salmon more evenly. Anyone have any thoughts? Thanks
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