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Smart Speakers in the Kitchen
I'm wondering Alexa users are using it for kitchen or cooking-related tasks.  
 
I couldn't find a dedicated thread but found some comments from other threads:
 
 
 
 
I am new to the Alexa party and jumped in late last year after Alexa got the Sonos skill, enabling me to control my sound system.  I was mostly interested in being able to do that in the kitchen, so when I'm listening to a podcast and some noisy appliance makes me miss a sentence, I can just tell Alexa to "rewind 10 sec" and I can catch up.   I paid $25 for a Dot, with a coupon from Sonos.  After trying it out for a while, I spent $30 for a second Dot over the holidays.  I already have speakers in every room, so I didn't need an Echo. 
 
I absolutely love using it to set timers - so much easier to use voice than need to dry off my hands to push timer buttons or fiddle with my phone.  Unlike a timer, I don't have a display to check but Alexa will gladly tell me that I have 7 min left on the oven timer, 30 min on the laundry timer and 12 min on my dough timer and when time is up, she tells me which timer is up.  For me, it's worth the $25 just as a multi-channel timer. 
 
I wish Alexa had a good measurement conversion skill so I could ask how much a tablespoon of something weighs in grams - she does OK with some things but not others.  
I also wish it had the ability to group devices so I'd be able to have the timer I set in the kitchen go off on the other Dot on the other end of the house. 
 
How about you?  How are you using Alexa?  Successes?  Failures?  What would you like to see added?
 
Host's note: this topic was originally titled "Using Alexa in the Kitchen" but renamed when it quickly morphed into a broader range of speakers.
  • 58 replies

Post in Breakfast 2019
Poached egg on a bed of lentils, fresh herbs, pickled onion, warm whole wheat pita
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The Pizza Ovens of Brooklyn
A fun graphic article in the New York Times 
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Post in What did you buy at the liquor store today? (2016 - )
Three new gins, don't know what the pink craze is about, but I'm not complaining. I had found the Flor de Savilla last year and loved it, really glad to find it again. Nice orange flavour. Gordon's pink has a decidedly cream soda taste to it. Have not cracked the Beefeater yet. 
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Post in Gardening: (2016–  )
I was distracted by strawberries but I couldn't put off the peas.
 
 
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Milling Heritage and Ancient Grains for Baking Bread and Beyond
I'm taking the plunge into milling my own flour to use in breads, sweets, maybe pasta etc. 
 
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Korus, Paris 11
I recently asked recs for quiet restaurants in San Francisco, and it does seem that they are an anomaly.    We are lucky enough to travel a bit and have enjoyed many small restaurants kitchened by young chefs who turn out innovative food at reasonable prices.    The diners are young and hip and for the most part quiet spoken.   
 
Case in point, Korus whose current Japanese chef pushes the envelop with interesting but always approachable plates.
A simple amuse of radishes and tamara butter
 
 
Smoked halibut under a cloud of chocolate scented cream

 
Asparagus with safran hollandaise and poutargue

 
And one of my favorites of the evening, fresh peas with strawberries

 
Tender as love octopus with dill pesto

 
Iberico pork with polenta and chickpeas

 
Rhubarb ice cream with basil and meringues
 

 
This was a tasting menu at €59.   We added an excellently conceived wine pairing at €37.     All this plus super attentive service...and a soft buzzy ambiance in which you could actually hold a conversation.
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Post in Your Daily Sweets: What Are You Making and Baking? (2017 – )
Peanut Butter Paprika Cookies from Sister Pie. Recipe available online here and in several other places.

There's smoked paprika in the dough and a smoked paprika/sugar/salt sprinkle on top. 
Edited to add that these are a bit less than half the size the recipe uses.  They're still about 2 1/2 to 3 inches in diameter.  
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Post in Food funnies
from the Guardian
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Post in Dinner 2019
Larb.  I used a mixture of ground turkey and chopped mushrooms to use some stuff up and it worked out well.  
 

 
 
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Now... Let's talk empanadas and bakery culture!  Today's fare is thanks to four bakeries within walking distance of my house.  Ambato is probably unique in the world for there being a small bakery within about 10 blocks of anywhere in the city (and that's being generous with the distance), and for most of the corner stores stocking fresh bread daily.  Ambateños proudly say that part of what makes us Ambateño is that there's fresh bread at every meal.
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Post in Tasting Japan
On a day trip to Nara we were accompanied by swarms of school kids who were incredibly orderly. The weather was perfect, the sightseeing impressive, the food delicious and the deer friendly. 



 
You could have coffee with an owl (or a pussy cat). 
We didn’t do it, seems exploitative, but I did ask for a photo for my owl crazy niece.

 
 
Lunch at a busy restaurant. The crab cake here was superb. Grilled king mushrooms, chicken teriyaki, a bowl of soup and a small plate of dressed vegetables each.


 
Manhole covers are often works of art.

 
 
 
 
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Post in eG Foodblog: Panaderia Canadiense 2019 - EAT! Empanadas, Arepas, Tortillas and Other Ambato Food On the Go
Alright!  Let's start with the Mercado Mayorista, the Ambato Wholesale Market, which is located in Ambato's south end, and I've taken you there along with me on two of my last three foodblogs.  This is Ecuador's largest wholesale and farmer's market, with an overall area just slightly smaller than Vatican City; it's about a $2 cab ride from my house these days.
 
 
 
Just outside of this market is my first stop: Doña Lidia, who has a small stand where she prepares Arepas de Loja.  This stand only appears on Sunday mornings in the stairwell door between a butcher's shop and a restaurant on Avenida El Condor, and it's only really big enough to accommodate Lidia's frypan, a two-burner cart, and Lidia herself - she folds her umbrella at the sides to fit into the doorway.  This kind of eatery is the very definition of a "hueca popular" - a hole in the wall snack stand.  Ambato is full of these, and everybody has their own favourites; Doña Lidia is one of mine.
 

 
What she's making is the signature arepa of the province of Loja, which is the southernmost Sierra province of Ecuador.  These are corn pancakes stuffed with finely chopped green onion and a mild, creamy fresh cheese; they're cooked on steel surfaces in achiote oil, which gives them a characteristic colour and crunch
. (Loja)
 

 
Arepas de Loja are 6 for $1.00; I know that I've got more eating to do, so I only bought 3.
 
 
 
They're really hot!  Properly made Arepas de Loja are served while the cheese inside them is still piping hot and liquid, so the first bite is always a bit of a doozy.  There's a lot of cheese in them, too, more than is normally found in an Ecuadorian arepa.  These are my absolute favourite street food when it comes to the quick breads, but there are only two places in the city where they can even be found - Doña Lidia outside of the Mayorista, and Doña Petra in the Mercado America.  If Lidia hadn't been here, I'd have gone down to the other market in search of Petra.
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Post in eG Foodblog: Panaderia Canadiense 2019 - EAT! Empanadas, Arepas, Tortillas and Other Ambato Food On the Go
Alright!  Let's start with the Mercado Mayorista, the Ambato Wholesale Market, which is located in Ambato's south end, and I've taken you there along with me on two of my last three foodblogs.  This is Ecuador's largest wholesale and farmer's market, with an overall area just slightly smaller than Vatican City; it's about a $2 cab ride from my house these days.
 
 
 
Just outside of this market is my first stop: Doña Lidia, who has a small stand where she prepares Arepas de Loja.  This stand only appears on Sunday mornings in the stairwell door between a butcher's shop and a restaurant on Avenida El Condor, and it's only really big enough to accommodate Lidia's frypan, a two-burner cart, and Lidia herself - she folds her umbrella at the sides to fit into the doorway.  This kind of eatery is the very definition of a "hueca popular" - a hole in the wall snack stand.  Ambato is full of these, and everybody has their own favourites; Doña Lidia is one of mine.
 

 
What she's making is the signature arepa of the province of Loja, which is the southernmost Sierra province of Ecuador.  These are corn pancakes stuffed with finely chopped green onion and a mild, creamy fresh cheese; they're cooked on steel surfaces in achiote oil, which gives them a characteristic colour and crunch
. (Loja)
 

 
Arepas de Loja are 6 for $1.00; I know that I've got more eating to do, so I only bought 3.
 
 
 
They're really hot!  Properly made Arepas de Loja are served while the cheese inside them is still piping hot and liquid, so the first bite is always a bit of a doozy.  There's a lot of cheese in them, too, more than is normally found in an Ecuadorian arepa.  These are my absolute favourite street food when it comes to the quick breads, but there are only two places in the city where they can even be found - Doña Lidia outside of the Mayorista, and Doña Petra in the Mercado America.  If Lidia hadn't been here, I'd have gone down to the other market in search of Petra.
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Post in Naming Cocktails
I think it's fair to say I've discovered (in the 1913 Straub's Manual of Mixed Drinks) the worst cocktail name ever:
 
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Low decibel  restaurants in San Francisco
First, we don't eat out much in San Francisco.    We are out of town much, and have found kinds of small restaurant, passionate chefs, loyal following AND a kind of civilized calm in the dining room.    Not the club or party atmosphere that is to prevalent in SF.    And the tab at these places is as digestible as the innovative cooking.
 
SO, are there these kinds of places in SF today?     We'd love to be able to dine as well at home as we do abroad.
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Post in The Bread Topic (2016-)
Nothing better than homemade croutons.   @David Ross, I would so snack on your croutons. 
 
Hand-mixed a 1500g batch of dough yesterday at 72% hydration. Divided it into three containers and put them in the fridge. 
 

 
Took one out the fridge early this morning and baked three baguettes and one small round.
The little round was a result of having to cut a piece off one of the baguettes so the baguette would fit on the stone in the CSO.
Took a  second batch out of the fridge this afternoon and will  make pizza for dinner.
And the other container will stay in the fridge until I feel like baking again. Maybe tomorrow or Thursday.
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Post in Your Daily Sweets: What Are You Making and Baking? (2017 – )
Hi, new member here-- inspired to post, because of this question. 
 
My recent favorite is the Espresso Chocolate Cake (now retired) from Proof Bakery in Los Angeles. I got interested in the recipe after seeing this unlikely BuzzFeed clip online (whoa, what's up with 30+ *million* views!! I wondered):
https://ytcropper.com/cropped/n45cd99135de59e
 
and later found the recipe in the LA Times. Takes a few days to make the component parts--- at least, if you work full-time like me--- but otherwise easy. The final photo is from the online recipe-- and made by the bakery, not me! I include it here to inspire you to Extreme Baking Greatness, not yet achieved by me. But: delicious and fun, for a first try!
 

 
 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Post in Baking with Myhrvold's "Modernist Bread: The Art and Science"
This weekend I made what might be my favorite thing from Modernist Bread - Modernist Pretzels!
 
The first thing you do is mix up Methocel F50 with water and let it hydrate for 18 hours.

This is what it looks like right after some immersion blender action.
 
Then 12 hours before make a poolish  Here it is right before it's used, nice and bubbly.

 
 
Mix the water, poolish, and a bunch of other things including flour until full gluten development and you end up with something like this:

It's coated with oil for it's fermenting step.
 
After 90 mins with no folds it grows:

 
Make this into 7 ~140g pretzels. I had a bit more dough so 2 were a little bigger.

These are proofed, I did 5 in my oven on proof and 2 in my steam oven on proof.
 
As I proofed them I got the lye all setup:

  Safety First!
 
Post proof they bake for ~10 mins:

 
Don't really look like preztels yet,  face down into lye and add some salt, bake for 5 more mins and you get these:


 
Turns out they come out OK in both the steam oven and the regular oven.  These are super tasty! 
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Post in eG Cook-Off #82: Salmon
Yuanyaki salmon, Japanese Culinary Academy's Complete Japanese Cuisine, Mukoita I (pp104-105).  A bit of googling tells me Yuan was the first Tea Master to grill with mirin.  Good.  Now if I only had a yanagiba.
 
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New house, new kitchen
Well, it seems I am about to buy a new house and move across town. The kitchen is what sold me on our choice. Here are a few pictures:
 

 
I expect the small table will go when the current occupants move, so I'll be looking to get a small island for the center. But a big goal will be for all the stuff that lives on top of my counters now to find a new home in a cabinet somewhere.
 
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Post in Provincetown, The "Outer Cape" and Wellfleet Too
More time out in Wellfleet.  We are not out there on the 4th of July for the fist time in many years and I am grumpy about it.  Here's a couple of recent meals.  The Bookstore at Wellfleet harbor.  Drinks
 

 
Mussels
 

 
Baked stuffed lobster
 

 
The Beachcomber, for the last time ever.  The town doubled the parking fee from $20 to $40, and since there are seven of us we had to take two cars.  $80 before ever stepping inside the restaurant!  Oh well, it was good while it lasted.
 
Burger
 

 
Fish sandwich
 

 
Steamers.  
 

 
Oyster po'boy
 

 
Here's the dune you have to climb up to get back to the parking lot.  That's my niece and nephew heading up, and my brother skulking at the top 🙂
 

 
 
My husband was craving a burger so we went to Local 186 in Provincetown.  Drinks
 

 
Seveche
 

 
 
Burger with egg
 

 
 
Chicken poutine. This was mine.  I've never had poutine before and don't think I'd order it again.  I did not like the gravy on the fries. Too mushy.
 

 
Burger with fried avocado
 

 
Another day, Mac's Shack
 
Oysters
 

 
Ritz cracker bluefish
 

 
My nephew ordered the Impossible Burger.  I asked to try it since I have not eaten red meat for over 30 years and  this burger supposedly tastes like red meat.  It was...weird.  It did not taste like red meat but it has a definite meaty flavor to it.  It's also very salty.
 

 
Fish tacos
 

 
Fish and chips
 

 
Salmon hand roll
 

 
Striped bass
 

 
Tomato salad with burrata
 

 
Big kahuna tuna roll
 

 
Watching the sunset from the bridge by our rental house
 

 
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Post in Dinner 2019
@btbyrd, great photo.  
 
We ate big this morning so I made soup for dinner. 
 

French Onion soup.

 
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Press Pot/French Press Coffee
re:brewing coffee in a press. A few years ago I saw someone from Peet's Coffee (perhaps the founder/president) on Martha Stewart and his directions were to pour a small amount of water over the grounds, stir, let sit for a minute while the grounds "bloom", stir again, then pour in the remainder of the water. I've been following this method ever since and wondered if anyone had any thoughts on it. Do you think the extra step is needed? I actually can't tell any bloomin difference in the taste but I'm bloomin well not going to change my coffee ritual now.
(pardon me if this topic has been done to death before; I used the new search engine and didn't come up with anything for blooming coffee)
Forget the Martha reference,
it's right here.
Now that I read the Peet's site, I see the stirring takes place after the remaining water is added.
  • 171 replies

Post in Tasting Japan
Breakfast at our Ryokan onsen was almost as special as dinner.

 
There’s a flame under this beef.

 
Onwards through beautifully coloured countryside to Kyoto.

 
And these little treats, an egg batter filled with shrimp and fried in kinda mini muffin pans. Served with soup and Mitsuba.

 
A modern day isakaya, four tables with room for say 24 at a pinch. Note the coat hangers for your jacket.

 
Happy owner who made us very welcome 

 
Some gratuitous supermarket shots, round the corner and open 24 hours.

 
 
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