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SteveW

Peking duck vs Cantonese duck

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This is a continuation, from the NY board when we were discussing the "Best Chinese seafood in Flushing." I was wondering what are the differences between Peking duck and Cantonese duck? Until recently I thought there was only Peking duck.

Could it be that there's no difference between the two, except for the name? Peking duck is associated with upscale dining, while Cantonese duck would be at the other Chinese restaurants.

--------------

Steve

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I believe Peking Duck is a specific recipe with many courses utilizing the whole duck, where cantonese duck could be more than one recipe refering to the regional cantonese cooking. I'm quessing though :blink:

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Peking duck is first and foremost a breed.

When it was first imported to Britain in the 19th century it was to be cross bred with the aylesbury duck.

It was then breed for it's own eating. It's what we see in the states as Long Island duck (actually a white peking)

Believe it or not the white peking was first introduced to my home state of CT back in the 1870s and then to L.I.

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i'm really no expert, but it's my understanding that the ducks that we generally eat are a breed called "pekin" duck, which is quite a different thing from the chinese preparation with scallion and brown sauce.

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I'm pretty sure there called "peking" but I could be wrong.

Perhapes "pekin" is just another name used. Why the G would be dropped from King i'm not sure.

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the "g" hasn't been dropped as there is no breed called "peking duck". :smile:

do a google search.

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I'm pretty sure there called "peking" but I could be wrong.

Tommy,

Thank you for the clarification. "peking" in a mispronounceation of "Beijing"

I was wrong. It's great to learn new things.

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I think that Peking/Pekin/Beijing/Long Island ducks are one and the same and they refer to a "breed" of ducks. Where as Cantonese is more like a style of preparation, sort of like "chicken cacciatore" is hunters' style chicken "cantonese duck" is Cantonese style duck.

My 2 cents,

FM

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"peking duck" is a preparation. it don't see evidence of anything other than that, unless there's a crispy brown and sweet species flying around that i haven't yet noticed. :blink:

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"peking duck" is a preparation.  it don't see evidence of anything other than that, unless there's a crispy brown and sweet species flying around that i haven't yet noticed.  :blink:

So I was right....According to Tommy :biggrin:

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"peking duck" is a preparation. it don't see evidence of anything other than that, unless there's a crispy brown and sweet species flying around that i haven't yet noticed

I typed Peking (with a 'g') Duck in yahoo search and got two results. This is one of them:

http://www.reichardtduckfarm.com/

They claim that they are purveyors of superior Pekin (no 'g') duck. What are they refering to?? Is Pekin and Peking different?? Now I am seriously confused.

FM

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They claim that they are purveyors of superior Pekin (no 'g') duck. What are they refering to?? Is Pekin and Peking different?? Now I am seriously confused.

FM

they are referring to the species know as pekin duck. they are *not* purveyors of the chinese dish.

i'm outta here.

ediot: changed "peking" to "pekin", and then took a nap. :wacko:

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Thanks for the great clarification g Johnson. I really thought Pekin and Peking are the same thing. It seems that your cantonese duck pic did not make it right though.

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Thanks for the great clarification g Johnson. I really thought Pekin and Peking are the same thing. It seems that your cantonese duck pic did not make it right though.

why was my clarification not thanked and called "great"?

note to self: include pictures next time. possibly pop-ups.

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I typed Peking (with a 'g') Duck in yahoo search and got two results. This is one of them:

http://www.reichardtduckfarm.com/

They claim that they are purveyors of superior Pekin (no 'g') duck. What are they refering to?? Is Pekin and Peking different?? Now I am seriously confused.

FM

The owners of the website probably included the work "Peking" in their code somewhere so that their site would show up when you do a search.

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They claim that they are purveyors of superior Pekin (no 'g') duck. What are they refering to?? Is Pekin and Peking different?? Now I am seriously confused.

FM

they are referring to the species know as peking duck. they are *not* purveyors of the chinese dish.

i'm outta here.

Tommy-

You did not clarify anything. It seemed you were contradicting yourself by stating that "Peking" is a preparation method and above by saying it is a species or breed. And you did not specify if Pekin and Peking are the same or not (I did see your earlier post).

However A BIG THANKS for making this discussion/argument/learning session interesting.

better?

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You did not clarify anything. It seemed you were contradicting yourself by stating that "Peking" is a preparation method and above by saying it is a species or breed. And you did not specify if Pekin and Peking are the same or not (I did see your earlier post).

However A BIG THANKS for making this discussion/argument/learning session interesting.

better?

well there you have it. i mistyped "pekin" as "peking" in that post. please accept my apologizies, as i did in fact add to the confusion rather than help.

pensively yours,

tommy

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why was my clarification not thanked and called "great"? 

note to self:  include pictures next time.  possibly pop-ups.

Thanks, Tommy. Just for being you. Fade to instrumental strings, sunset....

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You did not clarify anything. It seemed you were contradicting yourself by stating that "Peking" is a preparation method and above by saying it is a species or breed. And you did not specify if Pekin and Peking are the same or not (I did see your earlier post).

However A BIG THANKS for making this discussion/argument/learning session interesting.

better?

well there you have it. i mistyped "pekin" as "peking" in that post. please accept my apologizies, as i did in fact add to the confusion rather than help.

pensively yours,

tommy

No problem Tommy. This really was an interesting discussion. I kept it in my background and refreshed often while working because I wanted to know what the final conclusion was. I'm getting ready to head home now I have a pot of slow cooked RB&R waiting in the crock pot.

later

FM

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Thanks, Tommy. Just for being you.  Fade to instrumental strings, sunset....

Why did nobody thank me just for being Tommy. Specially as I didn't contribute to this thread purposely so as to leave room for other wonderful people like Tommy to make their typos with impunity.

Humph !

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Shall we do Top 10 Differences Between Peking Duck and Cantonese Duck?

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Thank you for the clarification. "peking" in a mispronounceation of "Beijing"

Small point: "Peking" is the Wade-Giles transliteration of the Chinese. The same which gave us a "j" to represent an "r" sound and a "t" to represent "d". "Beijing" is in the Pinyin transliteration form, which represents pronunciation a bit more clearly.

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Small point: "Peking" is the Wade-Giles transliteration of the Chinese. The same which gave us a "j" to represent an "r" sound and a "t" to represent "d". "Beijing" is in the Pinyin transliteration form, which represents pronunciation a bit more clearly.

clearly this is what i've been trying to say, with my sentence fragments and typos.

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