Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Vintage Beer?!


sadistick
 Share

Recommended Posts

Anyways, long story short...was at the good ol LCBO yesterday, looking at their various imported beers, and saw this really fancy looking smallish box, that said Fuller's (or feller's...cant recall, no receipt handy) 2006 "Vintage Beer"...well, with a $7 price tag each, it better be vintage!

Just was wondering if any of you folks have tried this...I bought a couple, giving one to my dad as he is a beer nut...they say you should actually age these 3-4 years...wondering if anyone has had any experience with it.

Cheers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm skeptical about aging beer for that long. But a vintage date on a beer bottle occurs from time to time. Sierra Nevada's Celebration Ale, for example, will put the year on the bottle. For products such as that one that have limited seasonal releases, the producer will sometimes put the year on the latest release. I can think of two reasons for this -- 1) assure the conumer is getting fresh product and that the retailer isn't just pulling some old product out of storage; and 2) invite comparisons of the product from year to year (for the true geeks like me).

We cannot employ the mind to advantage when we are filled with excessive food and drink - Cicero

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fuller's Vintage Ale is a wonderful English-style barleywine. It is one of my favorites; in fact, I have several of the 'stylish red boxes' hibernating in my closet. The vintage you saw, 2006, will be good, but it is better with some real age on it. The ones I have are from 2001, the oldest I think I have had was from 1997. Don't be afraid of the price tag, though $7 is a bit more than I usually pay.

But, if you don't like big, malty, high alcohol beers, don't waste your money.

Bob R in OKC

Bob R in OKC

Home Brewer, Beer & Food Lover!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here are some notes regarding 3 versions of Fuller's Vintage Ale I have from a barleywine tasting we did in 2003:

#13 Fuller’s Vintage Ale – 1997 (import commercial from the UK)

Honeyed malt with some earthy hop tones in the aroma. Fruity and malty with definite dark fruit overtones. Some dryness which could be alcohol, but which I suspect is actually oxidation. Pleasant, but didn’t really meet expectations.

Official Upper-Level Inebriation Ranking: Good Beer!

#14 Fuller’s Vintage Ale – 1998 (see above, the following year’s vintage)

YOHOOOOHOOO!!! Honeyed malt and earthy EK Goldings in perfect aromatic harmony. Palate matches the aroma, one of the best balanced beers of all time. Leans just enough toward the bitter end to maximally accent the maltyness. Just enough alcohol to dry it out in the finish. AHHHH!!!!

Official Upper-Level Inebriation Ranking: Best Beer of the Day!!!

#15 Fuller’s Vintage Ale – 1999 (see above,the following year’s vintage)

Still has that great honeyed malt aspect in the nose, but the hop character isn’t really there (strange, given this is a younger vintage.) Good depth of malt character, but lacking the balance of the ’98. It comes off a bit green. Good but not stellar.

Official Upper-Level Inebriation Ranking: Very Good Beer

These beers are able to weather a loooong 'maturation' period, but like I said earlier, don't be afraid to sample one now!

Bob R in OKC (BTW we sampled 20 barleywines that day!)

Edited by Okbrewer (log)

Bob R in OKC

Home Brewer, Beer & Food Lover!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Many microbreweries produce holiday beers each year, releasing them around Thanksgiving. Virtually every such beer that is released in bottles is also labeled with the year. This, at least to me, serves a couple of purposes. First, it assures me that the holiday beer I'm buying is this year's beer, not something that's been left lying around for a year. And second, for those beers that are worthy of aging, it allows me to keep track of which is which when I'd like to compare the 2005 bottling with the 2006, for example.

Two beers that do keep wonderfully are Sierra Nevada's Celebration Ale and Hair of the Dog's Doggy Claws. In my neighborhood of Portland, Or, one restaurant/bar usually has a vertical tasing of Celebration Ale each year, with as many vintages as it can find, sometimes five or six. And I've heard Alan Sprints, the head brewer of Hair of the Dog (also in Portland) say that he prefers the taste of his Doggy Claws after it's been in the bottle a year. At their dock sale this year, they had several vintages for sale.

Check out our Fooddoings and more at A View from Eastmoreland
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This might just be my opinion; but, one Holiday beer I find doesn't particularly benefit from aging is the Anchor Holiday.

We've been doing a tasting now for 5 years, and mostly, they just seem to get flat.

There are some changes in what spices might have dominance; but, they aren't usually particularly interesting.

Perhaps it's time to Switch to the Sierra Nevada Celebration or Speakeasy Old Godfather.

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have some 8.5% scotch ale that I made in may of 05, it's aged exceptionally well, as have some bottles of IPA that I found in the cooler at work.

In contrast, MOST of the other bottles in the cooler tasted like cardboard and socks, as they weren't designed with the strength or hop rate to mature that long (probably a 2-3 year span)

An interesting exercise is to buy a bottle each year for several years, and have a tasting. Co worker of mine does that with Stone's beers when he can get someone to send him a bottle (alas, they don't distribute in NC)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By adey73
      I've read a few allegations and disputes in the American craft brewing news about macho "bro"  culture, in recent months.
       
      Now the Scottish brewery whose PR quickly capitalised on Boris Johnson's senior advisor Dominic Cummings travelling from London to Barnard Castle for a claimed eye test, (while everyone else was in lockdown and the elderly were dying in care homes) swiftly launched a beer to celebrate such hypocrisy called  'Barnard Castle Eye test' https://www.brewdog.com/uk/barnard-castle-eye-test 
       
      This week however former and current employees signed an open letter highlighting the companies array of low quality manoeuvres all in the name of their Espirt de Corps "Beer, People and Planet....   
       
       
       
       
      But in response 'The Tsar didn't know'
       
      https://www.instagram.com/p/CP-2JyiJtvb/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link
       
    • By liuzhou
      It seems that the legendary traditional appearance and accoutrements of witches may have actually risen because they were conjuring up beer rather than malign entities from beyond.
       
       
      The full article is here.
       
    • By liuzhou
      Picked this up this morning, not because I wanted it, just to add to my collection of silliness.
       

       
       
       
      Love the brewery's honesty in their choice of name.
       
      My only question is "Why? I mean "Why?'" (to be uttered in a tone of despair).
       
      It tastes like some one had a glass of grapefruit juice with breakfast and then forgot to wash the glass before pouring a beer hours later.
       
    • By liuzhou
      500 years ago, Martin Luther started off the Reformation. In a way, this not only changed religious affairs in Europe, but also changed our beer.
       
      Article here.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...