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Prime Rib Roast


Jmahl
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I tried the Williams Sonoma turkey broth in a box to baste some turkey legs for Thanksgiving and thought that broth was pretty good too.

Although I do tend to make my own stocks, I rarely make turkey stock because I rarely use it. I've used the WS turkey stock as well as their demi glaces, and I've been happy with both. I just got my hands on some demi glace gold though, so I'm looking forward to trying that out.

Let me know what you think of the demi glace gold compared to the WS. I've used the former before (just once) and never the latter. I'm using the WS chicken broth for an apple/prune cream sauce for some pork tenderloins for Christmas dinner. Haven't tried that particular one before - and I'll let you know what I think. Robyn

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I've found the sear at the start only to be pretty ineffective...

I'm far from an expert cook - and I don't eat that much meat - but what I've found in general from limited experience is that if you cook something in the oven for a long time (like a roast) - you don't need to do a separate sear. With something you cook for a short time (like a pork tenderloin - which I'll be doing on Christmas) - you have to do a separate sear.

With fowl - well a big bird like a turkey browns on its own. And you have to do a little bird like a Cornish game hen on the spit on the BBQ (pretty high heat) to get it to brown up. Haven't really ever figured out what to do with a whole chicken - I suppose I'm not very motivated since Costco sells really good 2 pound roasted chickens for $4.99 - and for $4.99 - I'm not going to waste a whole lot of time figuring it out :smile: .

Quite frankly - I hate all recipes which call for a pan sear before doing anything else - because half my kitchen (and all of my clothes - and my glasses) wind up spattered with grease.

So perhaps some expert cooks/chefs here can share their "searing guidelines" with us. And maybe some tips about how to avoid all that "grease spatter" (I have a couple of those "grease spatter" things to put on top of the pans - but they're not very effective when you're trying to sear all sides of something shaped like a pork tenderloin (you have to hold the tenderloin up vertically to sear the ends). Certainly wouldn't be effective with something big like a rib roast. Even with relatively flat chicken pieces - when you go to turn them - they get you! Robyn

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Someone needs to step and do a whole standing rib roast SV.  Blast it in like a 550 oven to brown it at the end.  My baths aren't big enough and my vacuum bags aren't big enough to hold something of that size..

I was in Publix today and everyone was snapping up rib roasts (at $5.99/pound). I talked to some customers - and they all use "roasting bags". I've never used one before - but the technique sounds very similar to SV. Doesn't seem like an undiscovered method of cooking a rib roast. Robyn

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I've always done the blast at 500 and then oven off method, because it works for me. I am open for suggestions though, and like to keep an open mind, so this topic is of interest to me.

I did some work over the year with a beef company, and my friend there just sent us a 17 pound Certified Angus rib roast for Christmas. I keep opening the fridge and patting it on its little butt - we call him Junior and I am considering hanging his own Christmas stocking for him. He's almost become part of the family. He's swimming around in his cryovac, because personally I don't care for the "game" I detect in dry aged beef. I do intend to season it and give it 24 hours uncovered in the fridge before roasting though.

I certainly will not french the bones. The plate of bones on the table is a big family favorite, and "Deviled" bones for lunch the next day I consider a real treat, if there are any left. I agree that there is a lot of great meat there.

I am wondering how many ribs to roast though. I am only serving 7 to 8 people. I am thinking of taking the two bones from the small ends for steaks later for hubby and myself, but it almost hurts to think of desecrating Junior.

Will have to mediate on the subject...

The only place I've ever seen anything that big is in a meat cooler in a market before cutting! Will it fit in your oven? What do you plan to cook it in?

In terms of serving people - I made a 3 rib roast for Chanukah for me and my husband - almost 6 pounds. We got 4 meals out of it - and lots of fatty leftovers for our back yard critters (all of them - even the birds - like beefy/fatty stuff). So that's about .75 pound per person per serving. If you're serving 8 - that would mean you need about 6 pounds plus some for people who like ends/not rare pieces - people who are big eaters - plus some leftovers.

So unless you are really really big on leftovers - or will be having lots of people to help you with leftovers - I'd cut junior about in half - maybe 60/40 - serve the larger half for Christmas and freeze the rest for another nice winter meal. Robyn

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I've always done the blast at 500 and then oven off method, because it works for me. I am open for suggestions though, and like to keep an open mind, so this topic is of interest to me.

I did some work over the year with a beef company, and my friend there just sent us a 17 pound Certified Angus rib roast for Christmas. I keep opening the fridge and patting it on its little butt - we call him Junior and I am considering hanging his own Christmas stocking for him. He's almost become part of the family. He's swimming around in his cryovac, because personally I don't care for the "game" I detect in dry aged beef. I do intend to season it and give it 24 hours uncovered in the fridge before roasting though.

I certainly will not french the bones. The plate of bones on the table is a big family favorite, and "Deviled" bones for lunch the next day I consider a real treat, if there are any left. I agree that there is a lot of great meat there.roba

I am wondering how many ribs to roast though. I am only serving 7 to 8 people. I am thinking of taking the two bones from the small ends for steaks later for hubby and myself, but it almost hurts to think of desecrating Junior.

Will have to mediate on the subject...

The only place I've ever seen anything that big is in a meat cooler in a market before cutting! Will it fit in your oven? What do you plan to cook it in?

In terms of serving people - I made a 3 rib roast for Chanukah for me and my husband - almost 6 pounds. We got 4 meals out of it - and lots of fatty leftovers for our back yard critters (all of them - even the birds - like beefy/fatty stuff). So that's about .75 pound per person per serving. If you're serving 8 - that would mean you need about 6 pounds plus some for people who like ends/not rare pieces - people who are big eaters - plus some leftovers.

So unless you are really really big on leftovers - or will be having lots of people to help you with leftovers - I'd cut junior about in half - maybe 60/40 - serve the larger half for Christmas and freeze the rest for another nice winter meal. Robyn

It's the whole primal, still cryovaced from the slaughterhouse, dated and stamped. Junior was "harvested" on December 2. Love those guys, and they have honestly treated me like a sister. That is actually on the rather small side for this primal. Believe me, they have cookies and homemade limoncello coming out of their ears right now.

I've already done the measuring and yes the whole thing will fit in my oven with room for circulation. I'm thinking the whole thing, maybe, just to say I've done it. I have smoked two of the big boys on our big smoker, but never oven roasted one this big in the oven.

Two kids in college, poor, big eaters and the girlfriend of one and the boyfriend of the other. The other mid twenties and poor with my new son-in-law, who are also big eaters. They all bring stuff to carry leftovers home with them. Still debating taking the two ribs on the small end for hubby and myself for New Years when we will be all by our lonesome. And things will be quiet.

:biggrin:

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It's Christmas. Do the whole thing. :smile: I'm going to end up doing two prime ribs for separate dinners over Christmas. I have one in the freezer that is 6 bones and about 14 lbs. I'm getting another one on Sat from our favourite steakhouse and the chef asked me if I wanted a whole one. "How big is a whole one?" I enquired. "Oh about 22 lbs" he said. Um, perhaps a half would do nicely. :biggrin:

Edited by Marlene (log)

Marlene

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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It's Christmas.  Do the whole thing. :smile:  I'm going to end up doing two prime ribs for separate dinners over Christmas.  I have one in the freezer that is 6 bones and about 14 lbs.  I'm getting another one on Sat from our favourite steakhouse and the chef asked me if I wanted a whole one.  "How big is a whole one?"  I enquired.  "Oh about 22 lbs" he said.  Um, perhaps a half would do nicely. :biggrin:

Aww, I know I'm going to. Can't resist. After all, it's Christmas!

:biggrin:

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OK, someone brought up the difference between "jus" and "au jus" so bear with me!  I am one of those (apparent) idiots who actually really enjoys the jus served with the prime rib at restaurants, so how can I make it at home.  I'm of  the "low and slow" camp and love doing a rib at home but there just isn't enough jus to share.  I've looked up recipes that suggest low sodium beef broth but....ewww.  How do restaurants do it?

"Jus" is the French word for 'juice', and it's exactly what you're thinking - it's the roasting juices. The term "Au Jus" refers the the presentation of the roast, when it is served "with" the "jus".

You can find a perfect recipe for making it in Julia Child's "The Way to Cook".

But I can also share a secret with you: Buy a container of "Pacific" brand organic beef broth (high end supermarket or natural market or health food store), and reduce it by about 25%. You'll never spend time making it again from the roast juices!

Overheard at the Zabar’s prepared food counter in the 1970’s:

Woman (noticing a large bowl of cut fruit): “How much is the fruit salad?”

Counterman: “Three-ninety-eight a pound.”

Woman (incredulous, and loud): “THREE-NINETY EIGHT A POUND ????”

Counterman: “Who’s going to sit and cut fruit all day, lady… YOU?”

Newly updated: my online food photo extravaganza; cook-in/eat-out and photos from the 70's

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Oh thank you thank you thank you all for the time and care spent to post all these wonderful experiences . Im cookin a 16 pounder on sun and a 9 pounder on mon. I was wondering if anybody has ever herb encrusted a ribby roast and if so how do you cook it differently . I would assume just the same without searing ........thanks in advance.

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Oh thank you thank you thank you all for the time and care spent to post all these wonderful experiences . Im cookin a 16 pounder on sun and a 9 pounder on mon. I was wondering if anybody has ever herb encrusted a ribby roast and if so how do you cook it differently . I would assume just the same without  searing ........thanks in advance.

I've done some dried herby stuff in a rub and it was fine, no experience with fresh herbs here in this application.

Edited by annecros (log)
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So should these principles carry over to say lamb.. I am roasting a leg of lamb on Xmas Eve.. Like a 6-8 pound bone in.. What you do with that bad boy!

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=40548

Leg of lamb cooked at 65C/150F for 7 hours Gigot a sept heure. Internal temperature 60C/ F.

i4168.jpg#

Hmm, looks gorgeous, might have to try that method on my next leg of lamb. But was the skin crispy? I can't tell from the photo.

One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.

Virginia Woolf

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Oh thank you thank you thank you all for the time and care spent to post all these wonderful experiences . Im cookin a 16 pounder on sun and a 9 pounder on mon. I was wondering if anybody has ever herb encrusted a ribby roast and if so how do you cook it differently . I would assume just the same without  searing ........thanks in advance.

I've done some dried herby stuff in a rub and it was fine, no experience with fresh herbs here in this application.

awesome , did you just roast it low and slow Im kinda worried that the herbs will burn and taste bitter and with these gifts from heaven known as a rib roast I dont want to make any bad decisions. Im using all dried herbs save for rosemary some salt and oil. :wub: oh ribby roast your my favorite friend.

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I guess I may not know anything about how your supposed to eat a leg of lamb, but to me that looks raw and I would be afraid the worms were still living in it.

Worms? What on earth kind of lamb have you been eating? Why should there be worms? Juicy and pink is definitely the way to go for a leg of lamb, and I've certainly never seen any worms.

One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.

Virginia Woolf

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Oh thank you thank you thank you all for the time and care spent to post all these wonderful experiences . Im cookin a 16 pounder on sun and a 9 pounder on mon. I was wondering if anybody has ever herb encrusted a ribby roast and if so how do you cook it differently . I would assume just the same without  searing ........thanks in advance.

I've done some dried herby stuff in a rub and it was fine, no experience with fresh herbs here in this application.

awesome , did you just roast it low and slow Im kinda worried that the herbs will burn and taste bitter and with these gifts from heaven known as a rib roast I dont want to make any bad decisions. Im using all dried herbs save for rosemary some salt and oil. :wub: oh ribby roast your my favorite friend.

When I used the herby rub, I was smoking so it was low and slow and no sear.

Oven roasting, I stick with plain old salt-pepper-minced garlic-olive oil. I do it way ahead, and let the surface dry open in the fridge overnight at least.

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I guess I may not know anything about how your supposed to eat a leg of lamb, but to me that looks raw and I would be afraid the worms were still living in it.

Jim,

Worms live in apples, not in lamb legs. That's why we alway cook our apples...or is that why we always eat our apples slowly?

Tim

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Oh thank you thank you thank you all for the time and care spent to post all these wonderful experiences . Im cookin a 16 pounder on sun and a 9 pounder on mon. I was wondering if anybody has ever herb encrusted a ribby roast and if so how do you cook it differently . I would assume just the same without  searing ........thanks in advance.

I've done some dried herby stuff in a rub and it was fine, no experience with fresh herbs here in this application.

awesome , did you just roast it low and slow Im kinda worried that the herbs will burn and taste bitter and with these gifts from heaven known as a rib roast I dont want to make any bad decisions. Im using all dried herbs save for rosemary some salt and oil. :wub: oh ribby roast your my favorite friend.

When I used the herby rub, I was smoking so it was low and slow and no sear.

Oven roasting, I stick with plain old salt-pepper-minced garlic-olive oil. I do it way ahead, and let the surface dry open in the fridge overnight at least.

I agree wholeheartedly . Stick to the simplest form . The best seasonings are indeed s/p and garlic . Oh man ........now im all hungry . I've been cravin brie encrute lately.

Thanks for the tips . :smile:

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Sorry I am not sure about replying and all the quotes, etc.  Hopefully, HKDave can let me know I have understood his method of cooking the prime rib.  You said 20 mins blast of dry convection and then 325 dry convention...  I understand that to mean you are switching to conventional oven, not convection, right?  If that is correct, can you tell me why you switch from convection to conventional at that time?  I appreciate your thoughts and experience, thank you.

Nope, I use convection all the way; 'convention' was a typo. What I mean is to start the roast as high as the oven will go for 20 min to get the sear, then drop down to 325f, both on dry convection. I say 'dry' because I use a combi oven (which can cook with dry heat and/or steam) but in this case I'm just using it as a straight convection oven without any steam, so it's on the dry setting.

I can't think of any benefit in using non-convection for a roast. Conventional ovens work fine but take longer, so I use convection whenever possible.

Edited by HKDave (log)

Hong Kong Dave

O que nao mata engorda.

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I've found the sear at the start only to be pretty ineffective...

...what I've found in general from limited experience is that if you cook something in the oven for a long time (like a roast) - you don't need to do a separate sear. With something you cook for a short time (like a pork tenderloin - which I'll be doing on Christmas) - you have to do a separate sear.

...

So perhaps some expert cooks/chefs here can share their "searing guidelines" with us. And maybe some tips about how to avoid all that "grease spatter" (I have a couple of those "grease spatter" things to put on top of the pans - but they're not very effective when you're trying to sear all sides of something shaped like a pork tenderloin (you have to hold the tenderloin up vertically to sear the ends). Certainly wouldn't be effective with something big like a rib roast. Even with relatively flat chicken pieces - when you go to turn them - they get you! Robyn

I like oven-sear-at-the-start (OSATS) for larger roasts. I haven't had Shalmanse's issue with the roast being too watery to get a good crust at the start, possibly because I'm using different (non-US) meat or maybe because I usually let meat dry out unwrapped in the fridge for a while before cooking. I like OSATS better than oven-sear-at-the-end because there's no danger of overcooking, plus once you've got the outside of the roast seared you have less bacteria to worry about, which is a benefit if you're going ultra low temp. I'm not into the low temp thing; I don't like to tie up an oven for any longer than I need to and I haven't found low-and-slow to be of much benefit vs traditional temperatures for a good rib or sirloin roast. All things being equal, I go for the solution that gives me the faster result.

For smaller roasts, pan-searing usually is the best way to go, plus it gives you a starting point for a pan sauce. At home I use a big high-sided cast iron fry pan that reduces the splatter, but there's always going to be a little mess. Patting dry and/or letting the meat dry unwrapped in the fridge first also reduces splatter.

Do you need to sear at all? Yes, there is a benefit, even with big roasts that would be in the oven long enough to get some crust without oven sear. That Maillard reaction crust is a huge portion of the flavour and aroma of roast beast, and usually the more (within reason), the better.

Hong Kong Dave

O que nao mata engorda.

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HkDave,  Did you notice Post #72 from Toni?  I was asking you a question about what you said about convection and convention cooking.  If you are able, I would love to hear your answer.  Thank you.

See post #96, above. If not clear, just give me a PM.

Hong Kong Dave

O que nao mata engorda.

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HKDave, Thank you so much. I'm sorry...I thought I read everything well before I posted again, but somehow I missed your reply. Thank you, again.

One more: Do you believe in cutting the meat from the bone and then setting roast back on the bone and tying? Because I got a 7 pound prime rib from Costco for $76.00, I couldn't ask for a butcher to cut it. It is a beautiful piece of meat...versus over $170.00 at another meat store.

I am going to try your idea of letting roast dry in refrigerator...maybe about overnight like I do the turkey? Do you let it set out of the refrig. to come to more of a room temp. before putting in oven?

I am very excited to make a prime rib in the convection oven, and I thank you for your input. Toni

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