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Tiffin - Indian on Girard


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We got a flyer for Tiffin, the new Indian take out at 710 W. Girard.

(I lived in England for 10 years, and had some great Indian food. I also cook Indian food. Our office is near Karma on Chestnut St and Cafe Spice on 2nd. We love good Indian food.)

Tiffin's menu is limited, but has options for vegetarians as well as omnivores.

For our first foray we tried the Vegetable Samosa, and the Onion Bhaji. Main courses Saag Paneer and Chicken Vindaloo. The vegetarian Saag came with dal, Basmati rice, raita, and pickles. The chicken Vindaloo included rice, cabbage subzi, raita and mango chutney. We didn't order nan, because we some Trader Joe's in the freezer (TJ's nan's are very good and only take 3 minutes at 450F).

Everything was excellent. We lover the main courses. The chicken vindaloo was very flavorful and spicy without being too hot. The saag paneer had a great taste of spinach and the paneer was not soggy.

The only disappointment was the onion bhaji, which was a bit undercooked.Everything was super.

This was our first experience ordering from this place and we were very pleased. The meal came to $20 plus tip including delivery.

Philly Francophiles

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if only they had actual tiffin wallahs to bring me delicious homecooked lunches every day at a specified time, that would be perfect!

I actually read about someone starting a tiffin whallah service in Philly sometime in the last year. That's about all I remember, though, and I think they were mainly aimed at the Indian community, so I don't know how easy they'd be to track down.

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I just did a little online research, and this restaurant grew out of the tiffin delivery service -- apparently, folks started dropping by for food and so the owner started the restaurant. Go to http://www.tiffin.com for info on the delivery service. There are also some nice resources there -- Indian->ingredient translation, recipes, etc.

We may have to drive up 95 to check this place out!

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I just did a little online research, and this restaurant grew out of the tiffin delivery service -- apparently, folks started dropping by for food and so the owner started the restaurant.  Go to http://www.tiffin.com for info on the delivery service. 

Wow, what a great service! If I worked in one of their delivery areas, I'd totally sign up for that for lunch.

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Saw this in Michael Klein's column last week or the week before:

"Munish Narula, who sold his interest in the Karma restaurants, recently opened what he thought would be a simple healthful-Indian delivery service, Tiffin.com, out of a Girard Avenue storefront that last housed a sad-sack joint called Chick-N-Fish. When foodies began showing up for budget-priced takeout, he served them. Now, he said Monday, he's expanding Tiffin.com into a 30-seat dine-in space called Tiffin Store (710 W. Girard Ave., 215-922-1297). It should be ready by next week, he said."

Philly Francophiles

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Went there last night since it's right by my Pilates studio, and it was tasty. I can't speak to the authenticity, but we ordered some aloo gobhi, which was fresh and clean-tasting -- big chunks of cauliflower and potatoes, not cauliflower mush. $6.95, including rice, dal (also very good), a little bit of raita, some pickles, and mango chutney.

The menu is at www.tiffinstore.com, and it's different from the daily tiffin offerings at tiffin.com. I was in a rush, so I didn't ask, but I'd like to know if I could also order the tiffins to go or if you have to do the whole delivery thing to get those entree choices.

Also, the people behind the counter are nice folks. I don't think Tiffin is going to revolutionize Indian food in Philadelphia, but it's in an under-served neighborhood, the prices are right, and the food is good.

Edited by Diann (log)
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Also, the people behind the counter are nice folks. I don't think Tiffin is going to revolutionize Indian food in Philadelphia, but it's in an under-served neighborhood, the prices are right, and the food is good.

also they offer the online tiffin delivery service! that's a revolution right there.

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neat idea. Lunchbox delivery reminds me of Asia.

Dabbawalas in mumbai have something like a 99.9999% accuracy rate in delivering their food. Of course, they are bike messengers. Considering Philly's traffic, wonder if the "dabbawalas" here are gonna go by bike or car....

Edited by stephenc (log)
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neat idea.  Lunchbox delivery reminds me of Asia. 

Dabbawalas in mumbai have something like a 99.9999% accuracy rate in delivering their food.  Of course, they are bike messengers.  Considering Philly's traffic, wonder if the "dabbawalas" here are gonna go by bike or car....

Well it's certainly not that here. We ordered from them a few nights ago. They delivered us someone else's meal as well. We called and they asked us to put the third meal out front and the delivery guy would come back and get it. They did. Certainly not precision it seems :laugh:

That being said, the food was good. It doesn't replace the hole in my heart that Minar Palace's departure left, but I'm sure I'll be ordering again.

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they're already successful enough that they changed the time you have to order--last week it was 10 a.m. and now it's before 9. which is a bummer because that's when i get to work. (we were going to order today but didn't realize the time had changed).

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neat idea.  Lunchbox delivery reminds me of Asia. 

Dabbawalas in mumbai have something like a 99.9999% accuracy rate in delivering their food.  Of course, they are bike messengers.  Considering Philly's traffic, wonder if the "dabbawalas" here are gonna go by bike or car....

Dubbawallas don't always deliver on a bike. Often the tiffins go in a long wooden crate which they carry on their heads or on hand-carts as they "jog" with it for miles to the nearest train station or junction. Philly traffic is a breeze compared to Mumbai, so I doubt it will impact them (though all the stares and rubber necks might cause accidents and more traffic).

In NJ they have homemade Indian food deliver service in Indian communities. I have not heard of this in Philly, but if there is enough $$ in it someone will.

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In NJ they have homemade Indian food deliver service in Indian communities. I have not heard of this in Philly, but if there is enough $$ in it someone will.

but see, the problem with that is, then i'd have to have an indian wife to make it for me at home. and i don't have one of them. hence the need for tiffin.

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Since Mayor Street made his Gross Clinic announcement this afternoon, Jas, your office shouldn't be staying in for lunch.

Actually no, they should be. :biggrin:

That money's coming from somewhere.

Plus upkeep, transportation to/from PAFA, etc.

Belt-tightening all around!!

I'm sure delivery service for food in Philly is coming along before long.

Anytime in Williamsburg, NYC is basically a diner delivery service.

Quality and type of food delivered is another issue entirely.

Edited by herbacidal (log)

Herb aka "herbacidal"

Tom is not my friend.

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In NJ they have homemade Indian food deliver service in Indian communities. I have not heard of this in Philly, but if there is enough $$ in it someone will.

but see, the problem with that is, then i'd have to have an indian wife to make it for me at home. and i don't have one of them. hence the need for tiffin.

Since it's too late for me (American wife who claims she's French) I've been working on my brother and my brother-in-law to marry an Indian woman.

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  • 3 months later...

We got takeout from Tiffin last night. As others have mentioned (though not on this thread: hmm, where?) the takeout/delivery/eat-in menu is more or less standard Indian-restaurant fare, a little less exciting than the lunchboxes.

Still, it's good stuff. I was in the mood for lentils, so ordered a nice buttery dal; also a totally respectable baigan bharta. A couple of vegetable samosas had a great savory filling (though the larger one was a teensy bit undercooked). It came with a side dish of yellow split peas, and the whole shebang, including a side of naan, was less than $20. Cheap! And with plenty of leftovers, which I intend to eat as soon as I get home from work this afternoon. I can hear them calling me now...

The missus thought the food was better than that at the late Minar Palace: less greasy, for one thing. I can't speak to that, but I did like it a bunch, and I'm sure I'll get delivery from there again.

One problem: they forgot the naan, which made me cry a little. So don't make the same mistake I did: check your order!

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  • 3 weeks later...

I got takeout from Tiffin today after bumping into a mention of the place and getting a serious jones for some good Indian food. I definitely wasn't disappointed. The place is cheery and clean and the staff was very pleasant and helpful. I ordered the Saag Paneer and the Lamb Chettinad and thought both were some of the best I've had. Generous servings of both dishes, gigantic container of Basmati rice, a small side of Lentil Dal, and a Diet Pepsi all for $19! Awesome. I just finished eating a big plate of everything and am feeling very full and satisfied with enough leftovers for at least two more meals. Rockin' good!

I was told by one of their well dressed delivery drivers that I definitely have to try the Chicken Korma next time. It won't be long before I do. I may not cook again for weeks! :smile:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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I was told by one of their well dressed delivery drivers

They are well-dressed, aren't they? We went back last week, and I was struck that all the guys waiting around to deliver orders were wearing ties. Not something you see very often.

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I was told by one of their well dressed delivery drivers

They are well-dressed, aren't they? We went back last week, and I was struck that all the guys waiting around to deliver orders were wearing ties. Not something you see very often.

Definitely. I noticed all the drivers were wearing jackets and ties and looked like someone had left the gates open on a fine English boys prep school. It was rather charming, actually.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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  • 4 months later...

Had dinner at the Store last night. Ordered a few things from the August specials: The aloo mattar (pea) kababs were well flavored, if a bit gooey. The dahi bhalla, a cold dish, was "comfort food" to my vegetarian friend, though I think it would benefit from a draining of the yogurt to prevent it from being so watery. The mallar mallai methi (peas, fenugreek, cilantro) was really, really good. I could eat this often.

From the main menu, dal makhani (black lentils) was, as described above, very creamy, subtly spiced. Agreed that the began bharta was totally respectable, if a bit on the sweet side for my taste. Mango lassis were tasty, if a bit under-chilled.

At the service end, staff were very pleasant. However, mid-meal, clean up and deliveries began. Quite strange. We sat down about 9:45 and didn't drag. Also, another table of eight was cheerily dining. So while I don't think we were getting the bum's rush, just as we were served our mains, they began scrubbing down the kitchen, including spraying and vacing the floor. Then, a load of rice came in through the main door on a handtruck, followed by flour, followed by even more rice. No one bothered to close the door during all of this. Then, out came the night's garbage past our table. Bad, bad. Ran into friends afterwards at Johnny Brenda's, who reported the same experience, and they eat there regularly.

The Store is expanding to upstairs, with a September 4 opening planned.

ETA: the naan and the parantha were fine, though not at the Minar level imo

Edited by cinghiale (log)
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