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Rosh Hashana


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Here's the challenge . . . I'm all for doing something new but the old stand-bys are what everyone associates with a holiday. One Thanksgiving I made a delicious pumpkin mousse pie and all anybody wanted was the store-bought Marie Callendar's one. So, they never get my pie again!

I think it's always a balance, at least in my family. Something old, something new.

I haven't planned either.

So long and thanks for all the fish.
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While searching for some new holiday recipes, I landed here which had some inviting ideas such as SOUTHWESTERN TSIMMES STUFFED IN CHILIES which appears to be something entirely different.

And, of course, this has a number of variations ... most appealing is:

ROAST CHICKEN WITH ORANGE, LEMON, AND GINGER

(Pollo Arrosto All'Arancia, Limone, e Zenzero)

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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The ceviche I like and think I might borrow that for our first course. Soup will be kreplach in the broth. Main course is sorted but dessert is causing me a bit of a nightmare. I don't fancy the trad honey cake or compote. Maybe a fig tart? But is it going to be any good without butter? Maybe something with plums? Any ideas for something seasonal but not necessarily traditional?

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dessert is causing me a bit of a nightmare. I don't fancy the trad honey cake or compote.  Maybe a fig tart?  But is it going to be any good without butter?  Maybe something with plums?  Any ideas for something seasonal but not necessarily traditional?

holiday desserts from Epicurious

click on the link above:

DESSERTS

Fig Fluden

Flora Atkin's Dutch Kichelkies (Little Kichel)

German Apple Cake (Versunkener Apfelkuchen)

German Cinnamon Stars (Zimtsterne)

Heavenly Apple Cake

Middle Eastern Nut-Filled Multilayered Pastry (Baklava)

Zwetschgenkuchen (Southern German and Alsatian Italian Plum Torte)

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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but dessert is causing me a bit of a nightmare. I don't fancy the trad honey cake or compote.  Maybe a fig tart?  But is it going to be any good without butter?  Maybe something with plums?  Any ideas for something seasonal but not necessarily traditional?

What about a pear and frangipane tart? I made one two years ago and although it didn't look too pretty, it tasted very good.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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Why not consider the meal served by Benjamin Disraeli in 1876. During the years that he was Prime Minister of England (1874-1880), Disraeli adopted the habit of inviting important members of the government to his country home every year to celebrate Rosh ha Shannah.

The dinner he served in 1876 consisted of nine courses - three appetizers, three fish dishes and three desserts. Included were quail eggs from Italy, fromage frais from France, the fish known as "bass" from the United States and litchis that had come from China. Quail eggs have been considered luxurious fare since the time of the Pharaohs. In fact, during the reign of Ramses II, who isoften identified as the Pharaoh who held office during the time of the Exodus, these tidbits were so highly valued that the death penalty was imposed on those who violated the law and killed and ate female quails. Fromage frais, which is fresh, unfermented cheese, has been a favorite in France since the 14th century and was a special favorite of King Louis XIV who once called it "the Good Lord's gift to rich and poor alike".

Litchis are native to the Far East, and when they were first cultivated in China, nearly 5,000 years ago, the litchi wasconsidered a fruit so delicate and rare that it was served only in the homes of the extraordinarily wealthy. Nearly a thousand years ago, under the rule of the Song Dynasty, hundreds of thousands of acres of land were planted with litchis and the fruit was soon available to nearly all Chinese. Several years ago, litchi shrubs were imported into Israel from China and several thousand acres of land within Israel were planted with these delicate fruits. Fresh litchis are incredibly more tasty than those that come in tins.

Rock bass is native to North and Central America as well as to the Caribbean islands. The first European to encounter this firm fleshed, low fat fish was probably Christopher Columbus who described them in his diary as "so versatile that they taste marvelous if fried in a pan, cooked on an open fire or made into a stew". The rock bass now raised in artificial ponds in Israel are now considered among the best in the world.

Those who care to replicate all or part of Disraeli's holiday meal today will be pleased to note that regardless of whether they live in Israel, England or the Americas there is no need whatever to import any of the foodstuffs he used. The recipes for the dishes Disraeli served are given below.

Quail Eggs Carmen

8 thin slices white bread

melted butter as required

8 thin slices of smoked salmon

16 quail eggs

salt to taste

sweet paprika as required

Trim the crusts off the bread and, using a cookie cutter cut out 6 cm. rounds. Generously brush each side of these croutons with melted butter and place them on a baking sheet in an oven that has been preheated to 190 degrees Celsius. Turn the croutons once until both sides are nicely browned. Remove from the oven and set aside to keep warm.

In a heavy skillet heat 1 Tbsp. of the butter and in this heat the salmon slices through. Remove the salmon from the skillet and set aside to keep warm. To the skillet add more of the butter and heat through. Into this break the eggs, taking care not to break the yolks and then fry them until they are done to taste. Do not turn the eggs over during frying. Remove the eggs from the heat and sprinkle over lightly with salt.

To serve, cut the salmon slices into 5 1/2 cm. rounds and trim the egg whites so that they are the same size as the salmon rounds. On each toasted crouton place a slice of salmon, on the salmon place one egg and sprinkle over with sweet paprika. Serve two of the croutons to each guest and serve hot as an hors d'oeuvre. (Serves 4).

Florentine Eggs

1 kilo spinach, cooked and chopped

3 Tbsp. sweet cream

salt and pepper to taste

8 eggs

3 Tbsp. Parmesan cheese, grated

4 tsp. anchovy paste

salt and pepper to taste

Mix together the chopped spinach, cream and salt and pepper to taste. Transfer this mixture to a lightly buttered shallow casserole dish and spread evenly. In the spinach make 8 depressions and into each break an egg, being careful not to break the yolks. Sprinkle over with the Parmesan cheese and on each egg place 1/2 tsp.of the anchovy paste. Bake in an oven that has been preheated to 180 degrees Celsius until the eggs are set. Serve immediately. (Serves 8).

Fromage Frais with Apricot Liqueur

250 gr. fromage frais

2 Tbsp. sugar

2 Tbsp. apricot liqueur

white pepper to taste

1/4 cup sweet cream, beaten almost stiff

mint leaves for garnish

Pl;ace the cheese in a small mixing bowl and with a wire whisk, whiskthe cheese lightly. Add the sugar and apricot liqueur and then season to taste with white pepper. Fold in the whipped cream and place in the coldest part of the refrigerator for 1 - 2 hours. Twenty minutes before serving, transfer the mixture to individual serving glasses and place in the freezer. Serve directly from the freezer, garnished with one or two mint leaves.

Bass Scaloppine

6 Tbsp. flour

1/2 Tbsp. paprika

3/4 tsp. each salt and pepper

1 kilo bass fillets, with skin removed

6 Tbsp. butter

3 sweet green peppers, seeded and cut into strips

2 medium onions, sliced and separated into rings

1/2 cup Marsala or Sherry wine

In a bowl combine the flour, paprika, salt and pepper and with this mixture dust each fillet, coating well.

In a large heavy skillet melt the butter and in this saute the green peppers and onions until lightly browned. With a slotted spoon lift out and set aside the onions and pepper to keep warm. Brown the fillets lightly in the skillet, adding butter if the and skillet becomes too dry and then return the onions and green pepper to the skillet. Add the Marsala wine and simmer, covered, until the fish is done (3 - 5 minutes). Serve hot. (Serves 6).

Salmon Cutlets with Mushrooms

5 Tbsp. butter

4 slices of white bread, without crusts

4 salmon cutlets or steaks

salt and pepper to taste

about 2 Tbsp. flour

16 mushroom caps

2 Tbsp. Madeira or port wine

2 Tbsp. sweet cream

In a large heavy skillet melt 2 Tbsp. of the butter and in this fry the bread slices until nicely browned on both sides. Remove the toast slices and set aside to keep warm.

Season the cutlets lightly with salt and pepper and then sprinkle them lightly with flour. In the skillet in which the bread was fried, melt the remaining butter and in this saute the cutlets, turning once, until they are half-cooked. Add the mushrooms to the skillet and continue cooking until the salmon is cooked through, taking care not to overcook.

Place one slice of the toast on each of four preheated serving plates and over these place the salmon cutlets. Distribute the mushroom caps on the salmon and set aside to keep warm.

To the liquids in the skillet add the Madeira wine and sweet cream. Heat through, correct the seasoning with salt and pepper to taste and spoon this sauce over the salmon cutlets. Serve at once. (Serves 4).

Fillet of Sole with Wine and Cheese Sauce

8 large sole fillets

1 cup dry white wine

1 bay leaf

salt and pepper to taste

2 cups milk

1/4 cup flour

3 Tbsp. butter, melted

1/2 tsp. nutmeg

2 Tbsp. Gruyere cheese, grated

2 Tbsp. Parmesan, grated

In a large skillet cook the fillets in the wine, bay leaf and a pinch of salt until the fillets are nearly done (7 - 9 minutes). Arrange the fish in a baking dish.

In a saucepan bring the milk just to the boil and then immediately remove from the flame.

In a separate saucepan combine the flour and melted butter, stirring constantly over a low flame until the mixture is even in texture. Slowly add the boiled milk and then the salt, pepper, nutmeg and Gruyere cheese, stirring constantly. Pour the sauce over the fish, sprinkle with the Parmesan cheese and place in anoven that has been preheated to 200 degrees Celsius until golden brown (about 10 minutes). Serve hot. (Serves 4 or 8).

Litchi Pie

250 gr. fresh litchis, peeled and with pits removed (despite my better judgement, it is possible to use tinned if fresh not available)

4 eggs, at room temperature

1 can condensed milk

1 graham-cracker pie crust (can be made at home or purchased ready made at the supermarket)

whipped cream for serving

Using a blender or food processor, puree the litchis. Strain the puree, discarding the excess liquids.

In a mixing bowl blend and whip together the eggs, and litchi puree adding just enough condensed milk until the mixture is semi-liquid. Pour the mixture into the graham-cracker pie crust and refrigerate (covered with plastic wrap) for 4 hours before serving. Immediately before serving, top with the whipped cream. (Serves 6 - 8).

Edited by Daniel Rogov (log)
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Hi!

I am a non Jew with many Hebrew friends. I've been to a few of these meals. Might I recommend a flourless chocolate roll filled with chesnut puree (marons glaces) and whipped cream.

Or, lemon feather cake, a sponge made with potato flour and lemon filling -with again whipped cream and a little powdered sugar.

Life! what's life!? Just natures way of keeping meat fresh - Dr. who

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Hi!

I am a non Jew with many Hebrew friends. I've been to a few of these meals. Might I recommend a flourless chocolate roll filled with chesnut puree (marons glaces) and whipped cream.

Or, lemon feather cake, a sponge made with potato flour and lemon filling -with again whipped cream and a little powdered sugar.

Or perhaps without the whipped cream, for those who are having meat meals?

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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I wish I had somewhere to go.  I really miss my family's dinners.  I think Im the only jew in this town.  Totally frustrating.

When I was away at university, I was told by everybody in town that there was a Jewish lawyer also living in town.... three years and I never met him.

When I could I would return home for holidays - but it seems that many Jewish holidays fall in the first week of classes or during exams. So the first two years (in a dorm) I didn't do much for the holidays - other than bake dreidle shaped cookies at chanukah. but my third year in my apartment I invited my friends in for some holiday meals.

Rosh Hashana meant teaching them all how to make a mushroom/onion kugle - most of them were farm kids from northern minnesota and north dakota. Believe me they had never tasted a kugle much less made one. I think that I must have been home the weekend before the holiday because I also remember garlic brisket on the menu - also a new one for my friends.

Chanuka of course meant a latke party - which we all enjoyed eating in front of my roommates 8-foot christmas tree. But everybody took turns with the box grater and frying the pancakes. It was a lot of fun.

I was lucky to have friends that really enjoyed learning about my holidays and taking part in the prep and enjoyment of the traditional foods. I would have rather been home with my family, but this was a pretty good second choice.

Any chance of having a holiday meal with friends?

Edited by Pam R (log)
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Last year I went totally Moroccan for Rosh Hashanah and it was really wonderful. Made harira (soup), chicken tagine with olives and preserved lemon, a vegetable tagine (lentils and veg), couscous to go with them. Also, I think some tomato-type salad, sliced orange and onion salad, and a plum tart for dessert (non Moroccan). The flavours and ambiance of that type of food fit perfectly with the occasion, and felt absolutely right for the season.

Might do the same thing this year.

I don't mess with Passover, though.

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One of the local kosher caterers placed an ad in The Jewish Week to promote their Rosh Hashannah menu and both Blovie and I are thoroughly disgusted by their menu. It looks like something out of the shtetl, circa the 19th century. Plus, the way they describe the dishes is just so uninspiring. And this is a caterer that supposedly serves a more sophisticated crowd.

First Course

Chopped Liver with Onion Crisps

Stuffed Cabbage

Gefilte Fish with Horseradish and Carrot Garnish

Second Course

Split Pea Soup

Entree

Sliced Brisket with Gravy

Split Cornish Game Hens with Orange Glaze

Side Dishes

Garlicky String Beans

Potato Kugel

Traditional Tzimmes

Dessert

Assortment of Rugelach

Honey Cake

You can order this meal for $70/person. Oh, did I mention it's a 10 person minimum? And waitstaff is available for an additional $30 per hour/per waiter.

Many of you know, I'm not big on traditional foods. But, I can see where they have their place. But, this is so boring. And so uninspired.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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Even for NYC and even for Kosher thats freaking expensive. I have done my time with high end caterers in Bergan County NJ that could have certainly served cabbage and sting beans for less....

I mean ...I mean that like $12 worth of food wholesale..... Having a family event/holiday catered still blows my mind.

sorry :wink:

tracey

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

"It is the government's fault, they've eaten everything."

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..... Having a family event/holiday catered still blows my mind.

I love that people have their family holidays catered. :biggrin:

Brief comment on the offerings of the caterer - while they may be offering traditional foods to the extreme, in my experience people want traditional at the holidays.

We always add new and interesting items to our holiday order forms - but they get outsold from here to Timbuktu by the traditional stuff. In fact, we sell very few 'complete dinners'. More people are calling us specifically for the traditional foods and then cooking the rest themselves.

Brisket is very expensive. Every year we debate whether or not we'll make it. We sell it for over $30/lb. cooked and people still order it. Knishes, blintzes, gefilte fish, kugels are top sellers.

Now, when I go home after days of cooking all of these traditional foods, it's the last thing I want to eat (or serve) for dinner. While I have grand ideas of creating some interesting dishes, I'm usually so tired that all I really want is something basic.

About the price. :blink: I live in the wrong place. $70 US is close to $100 CND. Our complete dinners (from soup to dessert) run in the high $20 to mid $30's, depending on the meal. That's Canadian. I'm always afraid to charge too much - which is nothing compared to almost any other city.

OK... so my thoughts weren't that brief :wink:

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Having a family event/holiday catered still blows my mind.

While I agree that part of the whole holiday thing is the home cooking, there are exceptions.

This year for one of the nights we are going to my in-laws house for dinner (my parents are going as well). My MIL is a terrible cook and a clueless hostess. But most of all, she is just really disorganized when it comes to entertaining. So often times, the meals end up being served about 2 or 3 hours late, with many of the dishes being burned or otherwise ruined (a few years ago at Thanksgiving the dinner rolls went on fire in the oven!).

Today she told me that she is going to have the food catered. My mother and I joined together to let out a sigh of relief. It will be a welcome change.

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One of the local kosher caterers placed an ad in The Jewish Week to promote their Rosh Hashannah menu and both Blovie and I are thoroughly disgusted by their menu.  It looks like something out of the shtetl, circa the 19th century.  Plus, the way they describe the dishes is just so uninspiring.  And this is a caterer that supposedly serves a more sophisticated crowd.

First Course

Chopped Liver with Onion Crisps

Stuffed Cabbage

Gefilte Fish with Horseradish and Carrot Garnish

Second Course

Split Pea Soup

Entree

Sliced Brisket with Gravy

Split Cornish Game Hens with Orange Glaze

Side Dishes

Garlicky String Beans

Potato Kugel

Traditional Tzimmes

Dessert

Assortment of Rugelach

Honey Cake

You can order this meal for $70/person.  Oh, did I mention it's a 10 person minimum?  And waitstaff is available for an additional $30 per hour/per waiter.

You'd really have to be a farblondjet fresser to pay $70.00 per person for food like this.

As we say here in the twangy Midwest: Some people have more money than brains.

There are two sides to every story and one side to a Möbius band.

borschtbelt.blogspot.com

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I, too, find it hard to imagine having catering for the High Holidays (and I'm only half-Jewish!), but, oh well. Eli's here in NYC has some gorgeous pics of more traditional foods (they do holiday catering), but the nice photography might be inspirational enough!

The Yom Kippur eats in particular look yummy. :biggrin:

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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I wish I had somewhere to go.  I really miss my family's dinners.  I think Im the only jew in this town.  Totally frustrating.

Where is Exeter, Ontario? I'm in Ontario too - have dinner with us!

This is even better than J Date ... :laugh: and if you all get together over something delicious, do post your photos ...

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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I wish I had somewhere to go.  I really miss my family's dinners.  I think Im the only jew in this town.  Totally frustrating.

Where is Exeter, Ontario? I'm in Ontario too - have dinner with us!

This is even better than J Date ... :laugh: and if you all get together over something delicious, do post your photos ...

-----------------

AMUSE ME

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