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Rosh Hashana


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La Shanah Tovah, my dear friends!

Sorry to have been so far away for so long. The New Year will be better!

RH dinner (for 20) will be:

DAY ONE

Mock liver and crackers

Onion soup

Challah (with and without)

Tossed Salad from our garden

Steamed carrots scented with orange zest

Dolmades with mint and pistachios

"Buttered" noodles

Chicken Diable

Baked Apples stuffed with couscous, raisins, honey and walnuts

Pecan Bars

I made a double batch of dolmades and took some to a friends house where we will have them for RH lunch.

DAY TWO (just us)

Salad

Lamb stew

leftover noodles

Ravani (dense farina cake soaked in a honey/sugar syrup)

And thank G-d we are invited out for Shabbas dinner or I think my head would explode.

And Sunday I have mahjong at my place -- but it's only for four and it is my favorite meal to make, so I'm looking forward to it -- and whooping tuchas at mahjong!

May you all be inscribed in the book of life for a year of joy, prosperity, health, happiness, and a wheel of gooey Epoisse!

Aidan

Aidan

"Ess! Ess! It's a mitzvah!"

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I haven't quite figured out the new site -- especially how to quote from previous posts.

My dearest, generous, talented, and esteemed Bloviatrix, would you PLEASE send me your recipe for your orzo/pinapple kugel? It made my mouth water just imagining it! I'm already building a menu around it for Sukkot!

Oi! Sukkot!

Aidan

Aidan

"Ess! Ess! It's a mitzvah!"

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My dearest, generous, talented, and esteemed Bloviatrix, would you PLEASE send me your recipe for your orzo/pinapple kugel?  It made my mouth water just imagining it!  I'm already building a menu around it for Sukkot!

Oi!  Sukkot!

Aidan

Oh, PLEEEASE post it! It sounds wonderful!

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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It's probably too late for any use this year but this morning on NBC's "Today Show", Chef Ivy Stark of Dos Caminos in NYC did a Mexican spin on the holiday dinner.

"Spice up your Rosh Hashana, Mexican-style"

The Chile-Rubbed Brisket and the Butternut Squash Kugel with Canela and Queso Fresco (full of butter and cream) looked incredible.

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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Welcome back, Comfort Me! I didn't know what had happened to you and missed your wit and recipes terribly! G-d forbid someone had kidnapped you to bake Chocolate-Chocolate Challahs for their nefarious purposes! :shock:

Your menu as always sounds superb! Very energizing and enticing! I can taste it here in Atlanta! Thanks, as always, for sharing your culinary wisdom with us here!

A very happy, healthy, peaceful new year to you and your family, Aidan! Don't forget to check out this link to more Rosh Hashonah foods and recipes to try:

here

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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I had no plans of logging on today, but couldn't resist.

For those of you interested in the coconut-pineapple-orzo kugel ----- PM me your email adress. Once yantef is over I'll the scan the recipe and e-mail it to whoever wants it (it's long).

My brisket is happily braising away. And the onion confit is finishing up. Still have to make the veal roast. And run out to the market for salad stuff.

And of course, polish all the silver.

So, a shana tova to all my egullet friends. May it bring peace, health, happiness and prosperity.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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We're not doing anything here either. My family is all in NY/CA and FL, and I didn't have the heart to do it on my own.  :sad:

We're going to FL though to meet up with nearly everyone in 2 weeks for my grandfather's 90th, so maybe we'll do a belated celebration.

Happy New Year everyone!

Why don't you just go to a synagogue for a couple of hours tonight or tomorrow? If that's too tough a ticket (sometimes they are) - try Hillel House. That way - you'll have one of the most important parts of the holidays. Maybe see some people you know - or meet some new ones. BTW - I read your web site and noticed where you are. One of our nieces started at Ann Arbor this year - and my husband and I are very proud of her. Robyn

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Danielle - I know how you feel.  I've been cooking since the weekend (because I need to); I had expected 3 guests tonight and 4 tomorrow.  Well, at 10:30 last night, one person called to say she and her husband wouldn't be coming (and not for a very good reason), so tonight its just me and my husband (who isn't Jewish) and one guest.  I know quality is more important than quantity, but I just wanted to say I read your post and know how you feel - my family is also far away and at times like this I miss them, too.

L'Shana Tovah to you!

Thank you!!

Luckily, Michael had to run up to Ann Arbor today on business, so he is going to Zingermans' and bringing home a Rosh Hashana feast. Dylan has croup and is not letting me cook. I can only use the computer b/c she's napping!!

Danielle Altshuler Wiley

a.k.a. Foodmomiac

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Greetings from Portland. We had a simple dinner with family to celebrate the New Year.

Crown Challah, marinated eggplant, squash soup, roasted root vegetables with rosemary, oregano chicken, tomato and cucumber salad. Oh yes... apples and honey, and spice cake.

L'Shanah Tovah to all.

http://forums.egullet.org/uploads/10953536..._1095398467.jpg

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A happy, healthy, successful, and good eating year to all! And no more hurricanes or tornados!

I went to a Rosh Hashanah dinner tonight at my godmother's, uptown. I had brought first fruits from Chinatown - 1/2 lb. of longans; 2 small, yellow striped melons that tasted like honeydew, a big Chinese pear that was crunchy and kind of watery but not bad (not as good as a good comice, though); and a beautiful large dark green melon with black spots that we didn't eat (she'll keep it for her Shabbat lunch, when she's having company). Others brought some little green fruits (Central American, I think, but I forget the name) with thin skin that you suck on and then spit the pit out, and a big papaya.

For the dinner, there was some gefilte fish, and of course other traditional foods like apples with honey, raisin challah sprinkled with salt and dipped in honey. Other dishes were a Brazilian black bean soup, spicy but not very peppery at all, with optional mild salsa, and the main course: A tagine-like Moroccan chicken with dates, which was accompanied by tri-color couscous and sliced carrots, which I'm afraid must have been cooked with margarine. For dessert, aside from the fruit, there were also kosher baked goods: A very good pie with raspberry jam, raisins, and walnuts; good raspberry rugelach with plenty of lemon juice in them, etc. There was some fruity, floral Carmel white Zinfandel that I liked and drank exclusively during the meal. Everything on the table had some symbolism to it, and all 10 of us read something relating to some food item or other. We should multiply like fish and be the head and not the tail of the fish in the coming year, we should have the sweetness of the honey but not forget that life needs a little salt (I think it is, but nothing was read about that), our enemies should be crushed like the dates (though they weren't particularly crushed), the carrot slices represented gold coins, and I forget what the prayer about the beans was, even though I read it. :wacko: But hey, it's 3:19 A.M....

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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Someone just sent me this on a mailing list I am on:

For casting away one's sins on the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah, there is a ceremony called Tashlich. Jews traditionally go to a body of water such as the ocean, a stream or a river to pray and throw in breadcrumbs. This symbolizes throwing away one's sins, which the fish devour. Occasionally, people ask what kinds of breadcrumbs should be thrown. Here are suggestions for breads which may be most appropriate for specific sins and misbehaviors:

For ordinary sins - White bread

For erotic sins - French bread

For particularly dark sins - Pumpernickel

For complex sins - Multigrain

For sins of indecision - Waffles

For sins committed in haste - Matzoh

For sins of chutzpah - Any fresh bread

For substance abuse - Stoned wheat

For petty larceny - Stollen

For committing auto theft - Caraway

For timidity, cowardice; - Milk toast

For ill-temperedness - Sourdough

For silliness, eccentricity - Nut bread

For jingoism, chauvinism - Yankee Doodles

For excessive irony - Rye bread

For unnecessary chances - Hero bread

For war-mongering - Kaiser rolls

For dressing immodestly - Tarts

For lechery and promiscuity - Hot buns

For promiscuity with gentiles - Hot cross buns

For racist attitudes - Crackers

For being holier than thou - Bagels

For overeating - Stuffing

For indecent photography - Cheesecake

For raising your voice too often - Challah

For pride and egotism - Puff pastry

For sycophancy, ass-kissing - Brownies

For being overly smothering - Angel food cake

For trashing the environment - Dumplings

For telling bad jokes, puns - Corn bread

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Does anyone know where I can find some multigrain, sourdough hot buns?

Will drop them off on your doorstep after I finish eating my pecan-crusted crow, French bread, rye bread, and a ton of tarts ... :laugh: but, man, I sure hope God will forgive me if I passover the pumpernickle ... :rolleyes:

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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A culinary Al chait?

For the sin wherein we have sinned of using pre-processed foods

For the sin wherein we have sinned of burning the pan

For the sin wherein we have sinned of over-salting

For the sin wherein we have sinned of using non-organic or GM food

For the sin wherein we have sinned of using chicken stock in vegetarian dishes

For all these forgive us, pardon us, grant us atonement..

Add you own...

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I'm finally resurfacing after the 3-day holiday. Shabbos ended last night at about 7:45. I was in the gym by 8:05 working off all the food :laugh:

The two meals we hosted were successes. My menus were as follows:

Wednesday night (for 3)

Edamame

Carrot-Pear-Ginger soup

Veal Roast w/Mango Sauce

Apple Souffle

Grape tomatoes, roasted with garlic

Coconut-Pineapple-Orzo Kugel

Nectarine-Basil Sorbet

Challah w/white raisins, new crop Gravestein apples and honey

Ramon Cordova Rioja 2001

The veal roast was spectacular. It was nice and pink inside and very moist (cooked to 124). This is the first time I've ever made a veal roast using a meat thermometer. It totally makes a difference.

Friday night (for 7 adults and one child)

Chilled Yellow Tomato Soup

Brisket braised in pomegranate juice; onion confit and pomegranate seeds

Fruity Chicken

Ratatouille

Bulgur Pilaf with cinammon, clove and cardammon

Flourless Chocolate Cake

Concord Grape and Niagra Grape Sorbets

Challah with raising and honey

Tierras del Belmonte 2001 (Portugese red)

Tierra Selvaje Monestrell Dulce 2001 (spanish dessert wine)

Somehow, after 4 meals we were all able to find room in stomachs for yet more food. Everyone should be blessed to host guests such as the ones who joined us on Friday night. They were extremely enthusiastic eaters and attacked the food with gusto.

We have some food left over and one of the couples who joined us on Friday night want to come for left-overs this evening. :biggrin:

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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We have some food left over and one of the couples who joined us on Friday night want to come for left-overs this evening.  :biggrin:

Wait justa minute there, bloviatrix!! They are ready for seconds while the rest of us here on eGullet are reading and drooling over your menus? and haven't even had "firsts"??

Just doesn't seem proper .... :rolleyes:

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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Wait justa minute there, bloviatrix!! They are ready for seconds while the rest of us here on eGullet are reading and drooling over your menus? and haven't even had "firsts"??

Just doesn't seem proper ....  :rolleyes:

If you can hop on a plane, you're more than welcome to join us. :biggrin:

BTW, I actually got the silver done, with time to spare (not only that, I had time to take a shower as well, how's that for time management?). It's amazing how much better everything looks when polished. I actually just added a new piece to the collection -- I got a silver tray for my candlesticks. I must be on drugs. :wacko:

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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From everything I'm reading this challah recipe from "Baking with Julia" sounds Fabulous.  Would someone mind posting it for me or sending it to me via PM?  I would go out to buy the book, however have gone seriously in debt paying for my culinary education and supplies  :wink: , so would appreciate any help possible.... I can't wait to try it!

I second the notion you should buy the book. It is one well worth having. (I love the buttermilk bread, and it was this book that gave me the courage to try croissants from scratch! Now I've mastered laminates and feel lvery proud!

Aidan

"Ess! Ess! It's a mitzvah!"

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  • 11 months later...
(Jason Perlow @ Sep 15 2005, 11:13 AM)

It's only 3 weeks away, fellow eHebrews. What are we all making?

Since Jason has introduced this online, my question is this: for years I have made the effort to please and calm the anxieties of my kin by preparing old favorites which give them a sense of tradition and well-being.

Now, I hope to break free of the chicken-matzo-ball-noodle-floating carrot soup, the gefilte fish, the honeycakes, et al. and I don't want to be cut out of the will actually ... :shock:

So I am open to some newer, more glitzy "takes" for a Rosh Hashonah menu ...

example from Bloviatrix this September ...

Maybe ditching the gefilte fish ("oy! That again??" :rolleyes: ) for a gravlax or a fresh tuna ceviche?

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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Now, I hope to break free of the chicken-matzo-ball-noodle-floating carrot soup, the gefilte fish, the honeycakes, et al.  and I don't want to be cut out of the will actually ...  :shock:

:blink:

We're on two different wavelengths! I am often one for shaking up traditions - the last Passover seder I hosted had none of the traditional foods we usually have. Yet for some reason this year all I can think about is traditional stuff. I just spent a month working on recipes for all the old favorites (apple strudel, tzimmes, teiglach, compote, honey cake, honey cookies - I went old school!)

Discussing with my mother earlier today what we mights serve at dinner this year she suggested hot dogs and hamburgers! :huh: What's with that woman?

I think we may have to meet somewhere in the middle. Open to all good ideas. :wink:

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It hit me yesterday that I haven't done a bloody bit of planning. I've got a brisket in my freezer waiting to be sacrificed for a holiday meal. But other than that, I got nothing. Right now I'm toying with lamb shanks, veal roast, or duck for the first night.

We'll be 4 this year - I'm hosting my parents.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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