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Rosh Hashana


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I have now gotten it in my head that it would be fun to do a meal with an apple theme -- apples in every course. Am I making too much work for myself? If you see a thread in the Cooking section for apple suggestions, that's me. :laugh:

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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I have now gotten it in my head that it would be fun to do a meal with an apple theme -- apples in every course. Am I making too much work for myself? If you see a thread in the Cooking section for apple suggestions, that's me. :laugh:

Gave it some consideration after you mentioned this theme meal idea .. and investigation proved that it is indeed possible to do an apple-themed meal with all courses consisting of some form of apples ...

a plethora of apple recipes by course

but I can't allow myself the creativity that would respond to "where is the chicken soup with matzo balls"? unless I added some apples to the matzo balls, burying them deep inside ... :laugh:

or the gefilte fish with an apple-horseradish sauce .... :rolleyes:

or the Sweet and Sour Roasted Apple Brisket ...

and my usual red cabbage with apple sidedish ... an apple kugel ... or yam-carrot-apricot-apple tzimmes .. hmmm....

ending with Jewish Apple Cake ... of course ... :wink:

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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Thanks for leading me to the Passover chat - looks like fun.

One item that almost got mentioned there (but didn't) is equally applicable to all-year-round Jewish cooking - the secret ingredient for heavenly matzoh brei. I refer to onion flavored Nyafat. Nyafat, which is also available "neutral" (hold the onions), is hydrogenated vegetable oil - sort of a Jewish Crisco; the onion flavor is essential to delicious matzoh brei if you are from a spicy background as I am (I don't recommend onion nyafat if you like your matzoh brei with cinnamon and sugar -- remember, I put paprika in my tzimmes).

I use onion nyafat in any recipe that calls for "pork fat" or schmaltz - such as fried rice. It is parve, which means it can be used with either meat or dairy. It is very bad for you (when I was growing up, it came in pint size jars, but now it comes only in 12 oz), but it makes the foods cooked in it taste so very good!

"Life is Too Short to Not Play With Your Food" (coined while playing with my food at Lolita).

My blog: Fun Playing With Food

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I use onion nyafat in any recipe that calls for "pork fat" or schmaltz - such as fried rice. 

As Groucho Marx said many times, "Say the magic woid and the duck comes down to give you money!" That magic word is, and just in time for Rosh Hashonah and the entire holiday food orgy, schmaltz ...

if you missed it the first time around, here is a humorous article on this topic which will be sure to make you smile:

Ribeye on schmaltz circa 2003 :rolleyes: Nu? enjoy!

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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I use onion nyafat in any recipe that calls for "pork fat" or schmaltz - such as fried rice. 

As Groucho Marx said many times, "Say the magic woid and the duck comes down to give you money!" That magic word is, and just in time for Rosh Hashonah and the entire holiday food orgy, schmaltz ...

if you missed it the first time around, here is a humorous article on this topic which will be sure to make you smile:

Ribeye on schmaltz circa 2003 :rolleyes: Nu? enjoy!

You'll even find reference to Nyafat in that thread.

:cool:

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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I found a couple of references to Nyafat - but I have to disagree with those who think it is nasty. Now, I've never worked with real schmaltz (though there is a family bubbehmeintze about my grandfather, as a boy, carrying two casks of it on the ship that brought them to Ellis Island from Budapest because his mother had been told that there was none in the US), but I have had real Chinese fried rice made with lard when I was in China - and Nyafat gets darn close to the taste and mouthfeel. Matzoh brie is just not matzoh brei without it.

"Life is Too Short to Not Play With Your Food" (coined while playing with my food at Lolita).

My blog: Fun Playing With Food

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Another item discussed on the Passover thread, which is equally applicable to Rosh Hashonah, is how to get declicious chicken soup. In addition to starting with the right kind of chicken, which is increasingly difficult to get (a pullet or young hen; a broiler, roaster or fryer will not do), I use a trick I learned from Barbara Tropp's "China Moon" cookbook (which she attributes to her Jewish grandma) of adding some chicken feet to the soup pot. Yes, they look disgusting - but they bring serious collagen to the party. You can ask your butcher to order some for you; I now get mine at a local Italian butcher shop that keeps a supply in the freezer at all times; Asian markets can also be a source. And of course - never let the soup come to a full boil -- simmer only to keep it clear.

"Life is Too Short to Not Play With Your Food" (coined while playing with my food at Lolita).

My blog: Fun Playing With Food

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adding some chicken feet to the soup pot.  Yes, they look disgusting - but they bring serious collagen to the party. 

While I am aware of the value of using chicken feet in a soup for both added color and flavor, I have a kosher home and can't obtain the feet locally .. so I add the brown, clean onion skins, to my soup which makes it resemble the authentic "goldene" soup color ... my daughter is a vegetarian so she doesn't even want the poor fowl in the house .. :wink: oh yes, I always use a kosher pullet for the soup because the flavor is much more intense.

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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My mil recently share her trick for getting that gold color for chicken soup - a pinch of turmeric!! :shock: (I was suprised she even knew what it was).

Another was of getting the really deep color - make stock (according to egci) and reduce, reduce, reduce. When you dilute your stock cubes it will have a gold color. And if you want to further intensify flavor, just add some more chicken and vegetables to the pot and let simmer.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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I really like honey cake, but I have never found one that was very moist. Does anyone have a moist and luscious honey cake recipe, but not overly sweet.

Moist and Majestic Honeycake is a classic which I have had great success in making and serving. My guests invariably discuss the texture and moistness, the flavor and not overly sweet taste.

"I like a New Year's honey cake to be extra moist and sweet, as good on the day of baking as it is days later: This one is queen of the realm--rich, nicely spiced, in a word, majestic in taste and stature. I went through many variations and tasting sessions until I was satisfied with this definitive cake. One taster gave the ultimate compliment, saying, "This one is worth the price of the book." Like most honey cakes, it is a good keeper and can be made a couple of days ahead."
Sounds as if it fills the bill for what you are searching for, Swisskaese! :biggrin:

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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Oy. Just back from 10 days out of town. My parents are still away and I won't see my in-laws till this weekend. Still doing laundry from the trip and need to get the kids ready for school. In the words of Scarlett O'hara, "I'll think about that tomorrow."

So long and thanks for all the fish.
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Moist and Majestic Honeycake is a classic which I have had great success in making and serving. My guests invariably discuss the texture and moistness, the flavor and not overly sweet taste.

Thanks Melissa. I will give it try.

I am currently in Taiwan and will be back in Israel next Friday. I am going to be scrambling to cook and deal with my jet lag at the same time. :wacko:

Chag Sameach everyone!!! :biggrin:

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The holiday is 8 days away. I think I'm about to have a coronary. I've done bubkis. I've got to finish planning my main courses today so I can get my meat order in. :blink:

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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It's not traditional, but I'm proud to say that my parents have asked me to smoke briskets and chicken for the holidays.

Wait.

Come to think of it, I don't recall any mention of them paying for the meat.

Those bastards.

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It's not traditional, but I'm proud to say that my parents have asked me to smoke briskets and chicken for the holidays.

Sounds fantastic. You're such a good son. Mom will be shepping nachas.

I'm pround to say I got my order in to the butcher!! I ordered:

5 pound, first cut brisket which will be braised w/pomegranate juice and served with an onion confit -- pomegranates are very traditional because it's believed that each contains 613 seeds, one for each mitzvah.

2 chickens - I'm going to do make a sweet and sour sauce for them per Blovie's request

Ribeye Veal Roast which will be served with a mango sauce.

While I was out I picked up chicken carcasses and necks -- time to make the stock. :laugh: I'll also be making veal stock.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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There's an interesting article in today's Washington Post that advocates cooking ahead for the holidays.

The Caterer Takes A Holiday

The yummy looking French and Moroccan recipes can be found HERE

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Thanks for the links Katie. The recipes look good.

Joan Nathan has written her annual Rosh Hashanah article in the NY Times.

I awoke this morning to the wonderful smell of chicken stock (using the egci method, of course). Mmmm, heavenly. Veal stock gets made tonight.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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I've decided not to go with the all apple dinner. Furthermore, all that meat (plus a corned beef that's already sitting in my freezer) will be for a total of 5 meals. First night I'm hosting anywhere between 3 and 5. Friday night there'll be 7 of us. And I assume I'll pick up a number of strays for other meals. Blovie will be washing a lot of dishes. :laugh:

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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chag sameach everybody!

since we moved to hampshire and my daughter moved to nyc, i have not celebrated a single jewish holiday except for lighting the candles. its not easy to be a jew alone, especially a sociable jew who is not necessarily observant, but energetically culturally jewish. my daughter works long and hard and all the time, hopefully she will get some time off for the holidays (its a jewish hospital). next year, next year, we may have time to celebrate together.

so much for feeling sorry for myself.

honey cake. a big fish with the head on--the head being a symbol of wisdom for the coming year, apples and honey of course. and i'm in the chicken feet camp: nothing like a couple of feet to make your chicken soup taste super chickeny. enjoy, and here's to a sweet new year to you all!

marlena

Marlena the spieler

www.marlenaspieler.com

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Thanks for the links Katie.  The recipes look good.

Joan Nathan has written her annual Rosh Hashanah article in the NY Times.

I awoke this morning to the wonderful smell of chicken stock (using the egci method, of course).  Mmmm, heavenly.  Veal stock gets made tonight.

What is the "egci" method of stock making??

"Life is Too Short to Not Play With Your Food" (coined while playing with my food at Lolita).

My blog: Fun Playing With Food

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5 pound, first cut brisket which will be braised w/pomegranate juice and served with an onion confit -- pomegranates are very traditional because it's believed that each contains 613 seeds, one for each mitzvah.

2 chickens - I'm going to do make a sweet and sour sauce for them per Blovie's request

Ribeye Veal Roast which will be served with a mango sauce.

Perhaps you might need a Shabbatz Goy to clean up the delicious leftovers afterwards?

I work for food. :wink::laugh:

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