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Mad about Pot de crème


RodneyCk
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Such a simple dessert that packs a wallop! Or is that dollop? Bad pun aside; I know this French creamy custard exists in many forms. I recently had the chance to dine with a friend who was a pastry chef for Townhall, a San Francisco restaurant. Since they knew her, we were treated like royalty and consequently given many samplings from appetizers to desserts. My favorite was their signature dessert, a butterscotch chocolate pot de crème. Yum. I still think about it.

I went online to see if I could find a similar recipe or a base for duplicating myself. Ready to hunker down and roll up my sleeves in the testing kitchen, I actually came across an online newspaper that interviewed the owners of Townhall who gave the paper the recipe. Someone grew a snout and started to squeal. I can not find the original article, but did find the recipe on another website.

The link to the recipe is below.

I know there are many, many variations on this classic dessert. I was wondering if anyone else had a favorite they would like to share.

Butterscotch Pot de crème recipe

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_..._n15361945/pg_2

:smile:

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Here's my contribution - a favourite around here - a coconut cream one, great to finish an Asian-style meal.

300 ml Coconut cream (canned)

400 gm tin condensed milk

6 egg yolks

1 cup shredded coconut (preferrably fresh, but packet is OK). It works even without this, if you want a smooth texture.

Mix in the usual way, set the ramekins (makes 6) in a roasting dish and pour boiling water in to above half way up the ramekins. Cook as usual, chill, eat.

Even better if you make some caramel (as for creme caramel) and put it in the ramekins first. Or you can infuse the coconut cream with lemon grass or cardamom or something else first, if you want to keep more of an Asian theme.

Very rich!

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

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Ahhhhh...wonderful website Melissa, thanks, lots of variations here.

Janet, thanks so much. The cardamom addition made me drool. I am always stumped for a good dessert to pair with Asian cuisine. I do not typically like the "gelatinous" type desserts, lol, that are typically accompanied after Asian inspired entrees, so this is a keeper.

BTW, I read the intro to your pie "work in progress" book the other day. I love all the historical background, a very interesting read and so sorry about the publishers. Hang in there and keep plugging away. I would definitely buy your book.

:smile:

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Ahhhhh...wonderful website Melissa, thanks, lots of variations here.

Janet, thanks so much. The cardamom addition made me drool.  I am always stumped for a good dessert to pair with Asian cuisine.  I do not typically like the "gelatinous" type desserts, lol, that are typically accompanied after Asian inspired entrees, so this is a keeper.

BTW, I read the intro to your pie "work in progress" book the other day.  I love all the historical background, a very interesting read and so sorry about the publishers. Hang in there and keep plugging away.  I would definitely buy your book.   

:smile:

Why thankyou Rodney, you will get a personally signed copy if it ever gets that far.

As for desserts to follow "Asian" style meals - which is off this specific topic I know - fruits poached in a lemon-grass or ginger flavoured syrup work well, or lime and coconut tarts, or gin and tonic sorbet or limoncello sorbet are good.

Back on topic - I have somewhere a chocolate/orange 'pot au creme' recipe - but I cant tell you the recipe off the top of my head, I'll have to find it.

By the way - what are "butterscotch chips"? I have seen them mentioned a few times on eGullet. Are they like butterscotch candy, chopped up? Wouldn't you get enough flavour with brown-sugar/butter/cream/or golden syrup?

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

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In the USA, 'butterscotch chips' are the butterscotch equivalent of chocolate chips. They are not a hard toffee or hard butterscotch product.

Regards,

Michael Lloyd

Mill Creek, Washington USA

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Janet, IMHO, the butterscotch chips really don't taste like butterscotch...they taste like artificial butterscotch, which is exactly what they are.

Rodney, have you tried infusing the cream with ancho chiles for a dark chocolate pots de creme? It's a nice juxtaposition...first you get the creamy, deep chocolate flavor, and then it finishes with a little heat. It's quite good.

Eileen

Eileen Talanian

HowThe Cookie Crumbles.com

HomemadeGourmetMarshmallows.com

As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists. ~Joan Gussow

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