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yellow truffle

Chicago is the first city to ban foie gras

148 posts in this topic

Buck up, this isn't the end of the world for you guys. I'm sure your favorite chef knows how to make things taste just fine without fois gras. And it will be character building for you to go without, or risk your tails dealing with the seedy, underworld duck wranglers. Ah people, you make this world rich, not fois gras, you.


Edited by coquus (log)

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I wonder if there will be FG shops lining the Chicago borders like the Fireworks places located over the state line. :laugh: Seriously, not only is the ban ridiculous it requires vigilante patrol and reporting.


What disease did cured ham actually have?

Megan sandwich: White bread, Miracle Whip and Italian submarine dressing. {Megan is 4 y.o.}

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Buck up, this isn't the end of the world for you guys.  I'm sure your favorite chef knows how to make things taste just fine without fois gras.  And it will be character building for you to go without, or risk your tails dealing with the seedy, underworld duck wranglers.  Ah people, you make this world rich, not fois gras, you.

There's the rub. My people gave up eating other people for ethical reasons.

Hey, I know chefs who can make things taste fine without meat, and others who can make things taste fine without vegetables. Depravation may build character, but eating out is not exactly one of the things we normally associate with depravation or character building. Like I'm going to hand top chefs access to my credit account and say "deprive me." Not eating out on the other hand, might be considered character building.

Nevertheless, the last thing I'd suggest is a boycott which might hurt our favorite chefs who are suffering along with us. I would recommend supporting any chef who picks up and moves over the city line, and although I'd be happy to dine at any number of restaurants in Chicago, I will have second thoughts about contributing to other industries, particularly hotels, in town. Still, I don't think there are enough foie gras connoisseurs to really affect tourism, and that would be as true in NY as it is in Chicago.

It's absurd to suggest they should ban battery chickens next. They should have been much further up on the list of inhumane and unethical livestock practices than ducks scheduled for foie gras production. Logic would have suggested they be banned first, if there were really any ethics or logic involved. This is purely the work of propagandists who have managed to anthropomorphize water fowl, an easy job when you're dealing with bird brained aldermen.


Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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I suggest making your next lunch or dinner reservation at Le Francais. When I was there in October I ate lunch alone, and I mean really alone. So you'll be doing two good deeds - protesting this ludicrous ruling and supporting a gastronomic landmark that needs you.

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. . . .  This is purely the work of propagandists who have managed to anthropomorphize water fowl, an easy job when you're dealing with bird brained aldermen.

This is where I've stood on the issue since 1999 when self styled animals rights activists caused the Smithsonian to cancel a panel discussion and tasting of foie gras. The event was canceled out of concern for the health and safety of the audience rather than the supposed inhumane treatment of the birds.

Ducks naturally swallow grit and stones. The esophagus of a duck is lined with fibrous protein cells that resemble bristles and does not bear comparison to that of a human. The activists attempts at anthropomorphism are understandable when the intent is propaganda, not enlightenment.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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A SIGN OF THE COMING APOCALYPSE

America's Second City compliantly embraces new identity as boobish backwater. New York surely to follow. The deliberate dumbing down continues. Charlie Trotter can sleep tight tonite, comfortable in the knowledge that any geese or ducks with distented livers will soon be diverted elsewhere (though he continues to serve their other parts)--and that we are now one step further down the road to losing a beloved staple of classic cuisine that has been with us since Roman times. Trotter's influence cannot be understated--whatever his motivation or original intent. He provided cover and support for the worst elements of the anti-food/anti-pleasure police.

Respect and deepest regrets to Rick Tramonto who courageously--and at great personal cost--fought the good fight (in spite of some pathetically juvenile public groin shots from Milhouse). To those fine Chicago chefs like Grant, Homer, Paul et al, who will soon have to cook with one hand tied behind their backs--my sympathy. The rest of us shall no doubt soon be joining you .

An additional note: For yet another chilling glimpse of the future--and a sensible, well written retort, see today's New York Times editorial by the wise and wonderful Gabrielle Hamilton. Those miserable fuckwits don't want us eating butter-poached lobster--or moist, flavorful poulet roti either.


abourdain

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I was thinking of that it might be fun to run an all foie gras tasting menu for a while, but now I wonder if my time and energy might be better spent trying to run a campaign against Alerman Joe Moore. I wonder what my chances of winning would be?


Graham Elliot

@grahamelliot

www.grahamelliot.com

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Can anyone recall the last time in American history that politics were driven by a social, moralist agenda?

Hmmm? Thinking hard?

I'll give a hint--you could have enjoyed foie gras, but not the Sauterne to go with it!

Yes, it was the Roaring Twenties! What do the Roaring Twenties have in common with our current political climate? First, the gap between rich and poor is the largest it has been since the Twenties. Real Estate prices are the highest since the Twenties (really, no kidding--the average price of an apartment in 1500 Lake Shore Drive, Chicago's most exclusive co-op is $3 million. The last time 1500 had prices that high was 1929). The US elected conservative Republican administrations. Also, there are great similarities in the moral climate. The Twenties saw really quite naughty and promiscuous behavior from a certain segment of society and a huge increase in the evangelical movement in another segment. Sound familiar? Except now, we also have to contend with sanctimonious vegans as well as bible thumpers. So, the Twenties banned liquor and we are banning cigarettes and foie gras.

The Depression put an end to all that moralistic claptrap. People stopped caring about what others drank and whom they screwed and whether or not in a state of grace when they had no money. Periods of "moral" legislation tend to come about in prosperous times. Victorian England is a prime example.

If the economy sinks like a stone (which it will eventually), we'll get our foie gras back, and abortion, gay marriage, unintelligent design (take your pick) will cease to be important campaign issues.


S. Cue

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WOW, what a crock of crap. This does not bode well for the fututure of cooking the good stuff. Seems as if we are all getting pressed to eat Kraft dingles on wonder bread (but it's safe, yaaaay). I know that when I go into work tonight and someone orders a fioe, I will cook it proudly (as if I did not allready!) for soon it could be someone's last foie.

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Gabrielle's piece could not be more apropos. The last time I ate at Prune I had marrow bones and sweetbreads. If the food police and animal activists/terrorists have their way, these delicacies will soon suffer the same fate as our beloved Foie.

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If the economy sinks like a stone (which it will eventually), we'll get our foie gras back, and abortion, gay marriage, unintelligent design (take your pick) will cease to be important campaign issues.

She's a witch, a witch! Burn her, burn her. Sorry, couldn't help myself, bad analogy in this topic scordelia, otw good stuff.

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Gabrielle's piece could not be more apropos. The last time I ate at Prune I had marrow bones and sweetbreads. If the food police and animal activists/terrorists have their way, these delicacies will soon suffer the same fate as our beloved Foie.

If sweetbreads (one of my favorite things ever) get banned I'll be a very sad panda indeed.

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I was thinking of that it might be fun to run an all foie gras tasting menu for a while, but now I wonder if my time and energy might be better spent trying to run a campaign against Alerman Joe Moore.  I wonder what my chances of winning would be?

I'll help you. I live in the neighboring ward.

Also, here's a link for Gabrielle Hamilton piece, which is very good. What she says in part and parcel with the FDA and their obesession with raw milk products.

Gabrielle Hamilton in the NYT


Edited by scordelia (log)

S. Cue

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I recall some months back when this ban was first proposed. It seemed to die without much debate. Does anyone know how the issue got brought back up? Was anyone aware that a vote was imminent? Is/was there a group opposing the ban? I live in Chicago and would be happy to be in contact with others who would like to respond to this. It may not be too late.

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Scanning through the James Beard 2006 nominees, all the Chicago reps currently have foie on their menu. Going back to 2005, same thing as well, with the exception of Mexican cuisine master Chef Bayless. Interesting correlation between these chefs and those in the industry that have been opposed to this ban.

I wonder how much (if any) foie plays an integral part on these chef's menus. How do you compensate for the loss of this rare ingredient? Some chefs here are breaking the mold and preparing foie in so many creative (non-traditional) directions. Will we see a reduction of Chicago chefs represented at next year's jBread nominations? Probably not, but I sure will miss the creativity being done here right now.

<sidebar>

Slightly off topic, but has there been a Battle Foie Gras on Iron Chef?

I stand corrected. There is another Chicago representative on the list. Charlie Trotter himself. But note the title given to him. They refer to him as a "host," for the PBS television show, "The Kitchen Sessions with Charlie Trotter."


Edited by yellow truffle (log)

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If the economy sinks like a stone (which it will eventually), we'll get our foie gras back, and abortion, gay marriage, unintelligent design (take your pick) will cease to be important campaign issues.

She's a witch, a witch! Burn her, burn her. Sorry, couldn't help myself, bad analogy in this topic scordelia, otw good stuff.

She turned me into a newt! (Sorry.)

This is insane. Let me get this straight: foie gras production is inhumane, but the shitty conditions under which chickens and other livestock are raised and processed are just peachy. The hell?? What a weird, random thing to ban.


"She would of been a good woman," The Misfit said, "if it had been somebody there to shoot her every minute of her life."

--Flannery O'Connor, "A Good Man is Hard to Find"

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I'm totally embarrassed for my city. This is just ridiculous.

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Buck up, this isn't the end of the world for you guys.  I'm sure your favorite chef knows how to make things taste just fine without fois gras.  And it will be character building for you to go without, or risk your tails dealing with the seedy, underworld duck wranglers.  Ah people, you make this world rich, not fois gras, you.

Yeah, well, we make the world rich, but

fois
gras makes no sense. (Were you, by chance, CIA-educated under the able, but etymolologically*-challenged, Chef Turgeon? :laugh: )

Fabby,

the Spelling Nazi.

PS -- I think I'll start a foie gras speakeasy type of thing. Maybe I'll also serve unpasteurized cheeses without gloves. Oh, yeah. Who says I can't get a little crazy?

(* Yippee, new word!)


"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office

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I just emailed Mayor Daley's office asking if he intended to do anything to nullify the ban, especially given his comments noted in the Sun-Times article. Is it worth encouraging others to write or would it be merely tilting at windmills (or pissing into the wind, or...[your expression here])?

So, has anyone besides me written or emailed Mayor Daley encouraging him to somehow nullify the City Council's well intentioned but hugely misplaced concern for poultry?


Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and their readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

 

"A vasectomy might cost as much as a year’s worth of ice cream, but that doesn’t mean it’s equally enjoyable." -Ezra Dyer, NY Times

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I just emailed Mayor Daley's office asking if he intended to do anything to nullify the ban, especially given his comments noted in the Sun-Times article. Is it worth encouraging others to write or would it be merely tilting at windmills (or pissing into the wind, or...[your expression here])?

So, has anyone besides me written or emailed Mayor Daley encouraging him to somehow nullify the City Council's well intentioned but hugely misplaced concern for poultry?

No. I have and I know several others who have, as well.

=R=


"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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How about if those in our ranks familiar with the nuances of law assemble defensive strategies for those accused and challenges to the law itself, both from a PR standpoint and a legal view. The first move I'd make would be to compile a list of likely allies. Card-carrying members of the ACLU could form the first phalanx. Opponents of the bill should be wooed and encouraged. We should avoid sounding elitist but rather press the issue of our liberties being commandeered.

The fanatics don't have a monopoly on anthropomorphism. Our representatives from the duck world could say something along the lines of "I'm not going to sit here and let those politicians take food out of my mouth." (it may be necessary to improve that one)

Tony Bourdain can even rally the troops by posing for a picture of him blissfully stuffing his face with foie while wearing a "No Snitches" T-Shirt.

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I'm totally embarrassed for my city.  This is just ridiculous.

I'm embarrassed also! And slightly afraid of what is next.


I like cows, too. I hold buns against them. -- Bucky Cat.

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I just emailed Mayor Daley's office asking if he intended to do anything to nullify the ban, especially given his comments noted in the Sun-Times article. Is it worth encouraging others to write or would it be merely tilting at windmills (or pissing into the wind, or...[your expression here])?

So, has anyone besides me written or emailed Mayor Daley encouraging him to somehow nullify the City Council's well intentioned but hugely misplaced concern for poultry?

No. I have and I know several others who have, as well.

=R=

Well when this proposal was announced months ago there was a way to express opinons with our Alderman. I was on the phone immediately. My Alderman Tom Allen thought the whole ban was insane. This is so embarrassing. Wonder what happenend with the lovely foie gras at Fox and Obel? I have a duck in my fridge.

Save the liver!!!

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Buck up, this isn't the end of the world for you guys.  I'm sure your favorite chef knows how to make things taste just fine without fois gras.  And it will be character building for you to go without, or risk your tails dealing with the seedy, underworld duck wranglers.  Ah people, you make this world rich, not fois gras, you.

Yeah, well, we make the world rich, but

fois
gras makes no sense. (Were you, by chance, CIA-educated under the able, but etymolologically*-challenged, Chef Turgeon? :laugh: )

Fabby,

the Spelling Nazi.

PS -- I think I'll start a foie gras speakeasy type of thing. Maybe I'll also serve unpasteurized cheeses without gloves. Oh, yeah. Who says I can't get a little crazy?

(* Yippee, new word!)

I'll say it, you can't get crazy, it's a Nazi thing, a Spell-ling Na-zi thing. You should though, you should.

You got me, FFBabe 1-me 0. I really thought it was spelled that way too, shame on me, and my sixth grade class wants to tell you they are shamed they only had two better spellers than me, well, you know, they would probably be, if I knew many of them anymore.

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