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Cooking for our Queen


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They heavily criticised Atul Kochhar for the same thing the previous week. Anyone know when this was filmed, as most people seem to be using out of season products that were probably in season when it was filmed?

I was wondering about that. Seems to suggest that whenever they recorded it, the ingredients were generally out of season ( if they had the summer time setting in mind), while those who use the autumnal ingredients are criticised because of not being summery.

And britcook:

I don't think we're blaming her for the poor programming, its certainly clear thats the problem, and lies at the feet of the producer/director etc. I can't stand Jennie Bond, because as you say, she's perhaps the most irritating person on television, and has absolutely no knowledge (at least thats how it seems) of food, or for that matter presenting. After all, she was a journalist, not a presenter in her royal heydays.

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I was wondering about that. Seems to suggest that whenever they recorded it, the ingredients were generally out of season ( if they had the summer time setting in mind), while those who use the autumnal ingredients are criticised because of not being summery.

I think it is quite clear that the chefs know that the competition is to find dishes to be cooked at a banquet in June showing off the best of British seasonal cooking to top French chefs in Paris.

They may not know much more of the judges' criteria than that: I was surprised that they were quite so effusive about Mark's Stargazy pie (I'm not sure how exactly that transfers to a banquet setting), but he seems to be one the the few chef's who really took on board that importance of 'British' and 'seasonal'.

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They may not know much more of the judges' criteria than that: I was surprised that they were quite so effusive about Mark's Stargazy pie (I'm not sure how exactly that transfers to a banquet setting), but he seems to be one the the few chef's who really took on board  that importance of 'British' and 'seasonal'.

yeah, I was a bit startled. I didn't think they'd completely flame it, but neither did i expect them to go so crazy about it, I dont think theres been another dish in this series they've gone for so much. Admittedly it looked nice, but a large banquet? Doesn't quite add up for the main course of something so grand, even if it is traditional british fayre.

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This is the first week that I’ve actually followed this through (with the aid of fast forward of course!), although what I saw of the previous week was very good.

Mark Broadbent said at the beginning that it would be a David and Golliath match, with him taking the David role. It's looking that way so far.

He’s clearly not as comfortable on TV as media-savvy Marcus Wareing (all that Ramsay training), but I think this gives him a big “hearts and minds” edge from a viewer’s POV. I felt so sorry for him when he was feeling the pressure last night. I really like the way he has thought his menu through… but Wareing certainly won out on the desserts.

My money is on Broadbent(click here for menus).

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And so it should have been. He did indeed win. To be honest he deserved it, his food was creative, and in keeping with a british theme. Although i loved the idea of the earl grey custard.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have been downloading and just finished watching the second season of GBM her in the US.

Usually, I can get them the same day you folks in the UK do.

I really enjoyed the show, especially the razzing the chefs gave each other. They seem

to be really enjoying themselves too, and most of them seemed naturals on TV.

As for the show itself, they should package all the food-sourcing bits as a piece for

the British Tourist Board. "Here's the chef in his wellies in a beautiful pastoral scene." etc.

The food seemed pretty good, but the only recipe I have downloaded so far was the Marcus

Wareing dessert of Earl Grey custard and Eccles Cakes. It seemed a nice English twist on

the French Laundry's Coffee and Donuts.

I would love Food Network to do a show like this over here. I'd give it a 9 out of 10.

I knocked off a point for the hostess. I'm glad to see a lot of you Brits didn't like her too,

and that it was not just a view for the Colonies.

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I think Matthew Fort made a mistake in marking Mark Broadbent's mutton dish so low that it missed the public vote. Nothing wrong with Mark Hix's "vermin pie" of course but I think the mutton was the better dish. If it was me, I'd have chosen ham egg and peas (although the originality of that dish was grossly overstated); Atul's fish dish, the mutton and the perry jelly which was the best dish of the whole competiton.

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... I'd have chosen ham egg and peas (although the originality of that dish was grossly overstated...

Interesting comment, do you mean that it wasn't a Sat Bains original, or that the 'deconstruction technique' wasn't original, or that this sort of thing has been around for a while? Whilst it may not have been a true original, it certainly had a novelty value which wasn't found in the other offerings.

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The thing that struck me about the show was how old and tired so much of the food looked. In the first round they chose Sat Bains because they thought he cooked contemporary British food but after that we got tired old combinations, Jeremy Lee cooked a roast dinner, Marcus Wareing poached turbot in red wine (how old is that?), Marcus also cooked braised belly and a roasted Pork chop with crackling, Michael Caines cooked honey roast duckling wiht cabbage and smoked bacon and an apple tart, Stuart Gillies did Roast Loin of pig with mustard sauce - yawn. To me they are dishes that could, and in many cases were, around 10 or 15 years ago.

I don't actually object to the dishes themselves but as an example of modern British cooking it isnt really much of a demonstration. :hmmm:

"Why would we want Children? What do they know about food?"

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... I'd have chosen ham egg and peas (although the originality of that dish was grossly overstated...

Interesting comment, do you mean that it wasn't a Sat Bains original, or that the 'deconstruction technique' wasn't original, or that this sort of thing has been around for a while? Whilst it may not have been a true original, it certainly had a novelty value which wasn't found in the other offerings.

I have to admit that I had not come across the slow cooking method of cooking eggs before and was a little perturbed by it. Meat and fish yes, but not eggs. But having seen the end product and heard the plaudits from the "judges", well I can't wait to try it.

Incidentally, I understand filming is taking place in Paris today, tomorrow and on the day of the banquet this Friday. The programme, is to be screened next week (7:30pm Friday 8th June).....just as I am sitting down to eat my egg...... :smile:

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I have to admit that I had not come across the slow cooking method of cooking eggs before and was a little perturbed by it. Meat and fish yes, but not eggs. But having seen the end product and heard the plaudits from the "judges", well I can't wait to try it.

Incidentally, I understand filming is taking place in Paris today, tomorrow and on the day of the banquet this Friday. The programme, is to be screened next week (7:30pm Friday 8th June).....just as I am sitting down to eat my egg...... :smile:

We had a slow-cooked egg of some sort at l'Enclume last year as part of the "Underground" menu: it was fully cooked but still soft, and I think that we were told at the time that it was still experimental. I can't say how it compares with Sat Bains' egg, but we may find out in a couple of weeks time...

This assumes that the restaurant is still standing after Bapi's visit! :raz:

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Bacchus (click here for thread) has also been making a name for itself using slow cooked eggs:

The stand out dish for me was the sous vide egg which was reminicent of the Arzak truffled poached egg and in my opinion as good if not better - the chicken skin is an inspired addition. Pork jowl and the lamb were also highlights. Wine pairings worked well.

They've been popular for quite some time with the avant garde brigade in Spain. I had one in El Celler de Can Roca two years ago, served with sea urchin and oil of black pudding. The Sat Bains one looked much better, as for some reason, the one I had was not that soft in the middle.

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Bacchus (click here for thread) has also been making a name for itself using slow cooked eggs:
The stand out dish for me was the sous vide egg which was reminicent of the Arzak truffled poached egg and in my opinion as good if not better - the chicken skin is an inspired addition. Pork jowl and the lamb were also highlights. Wine pairings worked well.

They've been popular for quite some time with the avant garde brigade in Spain. I had one in El Celler de Can Roca two years ago, served with sea urchin and oil of black pudding. The Sat Bains one looked much better, as for some reason, the one I had was not that soft in the middle.

So, just to take this completely off-topic, does anyone know the secret to making these 65 degree eggs at home? I've tried using a rice cooker to keep the temperature low and constant, but interestingly the yolk always cooks before the white. Anyone know how to do this without an expensive water bath??

Lee

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The thing that struck me about the show was how old and tired so much of the food looked. In the first round they chose Sat Bains because they thought he cooked contemporary British food but after that we got tired old combinations, Jeremy Lee cooked a roast dinner, Marcus Wareing poached turbot in red wine (how old is that?), Marcus also cooked braised belly and a roasted Pork chop with crackling, Michael Caines cooked honey roast duckling wiht cabbage and smoked bacon and an apple tart, Stuart Gillies did Roast Loin of pig with mustard sauce - yawn. To me they are dishes that could, and in many cases were, around 10 or 15 years ago.

And those dishes were cutting edge compared to most of the desserts. The French are going to love that jelly and ice cream.

So, just to take this completely off-topic, does anyone know the secret to making these 65 degree eggs at home?  I've tried using a rice cooker to keep the temperature low and constant, but interestingly the yolk always cooks before the white.  Anyone know how to do this without an expensive water bath??

Lee

The yolk always starts to set first with this method - the trick is getting the white to firm up enough without overdoing the yolk. For more accuracy than a rice or slow cooker allows your best bet is a large pot, filled with water and placed in the oven. Test with a thermometer for the right water temperature then pop the egg in and leave for around 2 hours - any fluctuations in the oven temp shouldn't impact on the water temperature too much. Unless your oven is really crap.

restaurant, private catering, consultancy
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I have to admit that I had not come across the slow cooking method of cooking eggs before and was a little perturbed by it. Meat and fish yes, but not eggs. But having seen the end product and heard the plaudits from the "judges", well I can't wait to try it.

That's what happens when you never leave these Isles Bapi :rolleyes: . It's so old hat now they even do a slow cooked egg at Chapter One.

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That's what happens when you never leave these Isles Bapi :rolleyes:

Guilty as charged Scott, I have been rather parochial; though thankfully- soon to be remedied..............

Edited by Bapi (log)
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  • 2 weeks later...

I was expecting a host of exclusively French 3* legends to be eating our British heroes fayre, but outside of Gagnaire and the head of Michelin was rather disapointed with the line up and more to the point the previous weeks build up. However, I was more than surprised to see the Uk's contigent of gourmands, such as Mick Hucknell, some 'y list' participant from 'celebrity z list masterchef' and a host of news readers ( who ever thought this profession had so many fine diners in their ranks)?

Outside of the entertainment value, Sat, Dickie and Hixy, certainly made a very funny and interesting trio, I am not sure what it achieved. Unless, in towns and cities across France people are changing their opinions of English cuisine and tucking into pies and jelly and ice cream. ???

Next year 'Cooking For God', whereby chefs compete to cook.................

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I was very disappointed with the guest list, a rather large number seemed to have travelled from Britain. The winning chefs probably serve more french diners in their own restaurants of an evening than were at this much hyped emabassy dinner.

I wonder if the bbc realise there is a world outside of the celebrity bubbble and that footballers, pop stars and tv presenters do not by definition make good television.

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  • 2 months later...
A little birdie tells me Anthony Flinn is on the new one (so much for not being interested in TV)...wonder what he'll do as a starter?

'And how exactly is risotto a British dish?'

i could tell you the main course but that would spoil the suprise :wink:

appearance of sat bains in the last one made them re-think.

this one also features simon rogon & paul kitching so in decent company

think it's called 'cooking for the worlds best chefs'

you don't win friends with salad

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A little birdie tells me Anthony Flinn is on the new one (so much for not being interested in TV)...wonder what he'll do as a starter?

'And how exactly is risotto a British dish?'

i could tell you the main course but that would spoil the suprise :wink:

appearance of sat bains in the last one made them re-think.

this one also features simon rogon & paul kitching so in decent company

think it's called 'cooking for the worlds best chefs'

Christ on a bike....... the 'avant-garde' elite of the British food scene!!! Paul K making his TV debut now that is going to be interesting. Is it Rogan v's Kitching in a NorthWest Derby? Or is Paul representing his native NorthEast??? Who will they be cooking for ???

Come on Gary spil the proverbial deconstructed beans!!!!!

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I get the impression they're also doing a proper menu this time (ie two or three starters, etc). All the 'judging' is taking place in a couple of days (indeed, today), so no idea how much this is pre-selected. WOuld sort of assume it is.

(edit to trim quotes)

Edited by BertieWooster (log)

It no longer exists, but it was lovely.

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don't know much more, i think the format was them cooking in their own kitchens for the judges - there is also a 4th resto involved but don't know who that is, and the winners go on from there to a head to head the TV kitchen. As bertie says they were finding out on tuesday who had won.

you don't win friends with salad

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