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Pastry Art & Design Magazine


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Good to know my subscription wasn't lost.  Today I received my Dessert Professional, the new version of a combined magazine (PA&D, Frozen Desserts & Chocolatier).  Same guts as the old format.

Is this mag subscription only?

Is there an article on the Pierre Herme class that was taught over the summer at the French Pastry School?

Thanks!

2317/5000

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The used to have it at Barnes & Noble but I haven't seen PA&D or Chocolatier there for a couple months now.

Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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The used to have it at Barnes & Noble but I haven't seen PA&D or Chocolatier there for a couple months now.

They no longer carry these...

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Pastry Art & Design was being carried by Barnes & Noble here in NYC as recently as last issue, but the three B&N's near me each have magazine sales bigger than the combined stores in some states (literally, top 3 nationwide by a wide margin) so perhaps they get a different line-up of magazines.

They seemed to follow the Food Network trend of moving from "how-to" and techniques to lifestyle and profiles, which is an important facet but not one I find as useful, so my passion to run out and buy the latest issue kept declining over the years. A shame, as I started my pastry career shift by steadily devouring issues of Chocolatier in the early-90s and moving on to PAD.

Pastry's Best had been steadily improving over the last 5 or 6 issues, so I'll miss it if it is really gone. I was supposed to be interviewed for part of an article several months ago and they seemed to drop the ball, which may be part of their production going on hold.

Pastry and Baking NA (and Asia) are both good but I haven't gotten around to subscribing yet.

The only magazine I find it worth reading regularly is Journal du Patissier but it's only in French if that doesn't work for you.

Brian Ibbotson

Pastry Sous for Production and Menu Research & Development

Sous Chef for Food Safety and Quality Assurance

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So has anyone found out if it is or will be available at a bookstore, or is it subscription only?

Jason

I have had a subscription to this magazine for the last 5 years. Though I do see it at the local B & N. That is in smallish town TN, so it should be available at most B & N stores.

On this subject, they have just merged their 3 magazines (Pastry Art & Design, Chocolatier, and Frozen Desserts) into one larger magazine. I just received the inaugural issue and it is nice to have all the info in one place for one price. I think the magazine is a great read for professionals or serious amateurs. If you get only one good recipe out of each issue, it is more than worth it.

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  • 6 months later...

Hello,

I'm hoping someone has the March 2006 issue of Pastry Art and design. I'm trying to dig up some info on paillette feuilletine and I was told this issue may have some actual recipes to make it. Could anyone please shed some light on the contents of this article. Any help would be most appreciated.

Cheers

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Hello,

I'm hoping someone has the March 2006 issue of Pastry Art and design.  I'm trying to dig up some info on paillette feuilletine and I was told this issue may have some actual recipes to make it.  Could anyone please shed some light on the contents of this article.  Any help would be most appreciated.

Cheers

It just talks about using it in desserts, there wasn't any recipes.

Mark

www.roseconfections.com

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Hello,

I'm hoping someone has the March 2006 issue of Pastry Art and design.  I'm trying to dig up some info on paillette feuilletine and I was told this issue may have some actual recipes to make it.  Could anyone please shed some light on the contents of this article.  Any help would be most appreciated.

Cheers

It would be like making your own corn flakes.

You could go to say, a Williams Sonoma and if they have those cookie triangles like in a European ice cream shop (crepe dentelles?) you could robo them.

Epicurious pastrychefcentral.com should have it on the food site.

Good Luck!

2317/5000

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Here's the recipe I recently used:

To make 2.1oz / 60g of gavottes (lace crepes)

1/3 cup (80ml) whole milk

2/3 Tbsp (8g) unsalted butter

1/3 cup – 2tsp (35g) all-purpose flour

1 Tbsp / 0.5 oz (15g) beaten egg

1 tsp (3.5g) granulated sugar

½ tsp vegetable oil

1. Heat the milk and butter together until butter is completely melted. Remove from the heat.

2. Sift flour into milk-butter mixture while beating, add egg and granulated sugar. Make sure there are no lumps.

3. Grease a baking sheet and spread batter thinly over it.

4. Bake at 430°F (220°C) for a few minutes until the crepe is golden and crispy. Let cool.

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Here's the recipe I recently used:

To make 2.1oz / 60g of gavottes (lace crepes)

1/3 cup (80ml) whole milk   

2/3 Tbsp (8g) unsalted butter   

1/3 cup – 2tsp (35g) all-purpose flour 

1 Tbsp / 0.5 oz (15g) beaten egg

1 tsp (3.5g) granulated sugar

½ tsp vegetable oil

1. Heat the milk and butter together until butter is completely melted. Remove from the heat.

2. Sift flour into milk-butter mixture while beating, add egg and granulated sugar. Make sure there are no lumps.

3. Grease a baking sheet and spread batter thinly over it.

4. Bake at 430°F (220°C) for a few minutes until the crepe is golden and crispy. Let cool.

How well did it work? How did you use it?

Mike

The Dairy Show

Special Edition 3-In The Kitchen at Momofuku Milk Bar

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