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The Garbage Plate


philadining
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Also--Beef on a Weck is basically a French dip --the roll is special to Buffalo. My understanding is the French Dip originates from a place in Los Angeles. I am not sure of the timing.

That would be Philippe's back in 1918 according to their website. Is the roll for a Beef on a Weck also dipped in the drippings of the roast?

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A purported recipe.

That's not the real recipe - Nick (the father) had to give it up at a card game years ago (he's since passed on)

I suspected something like that...

So Gordon, if you were jonesing for a garbage plate at 2am, (which is generally the only time they seem like a really good idea) where would you go?

"Philadelphia’s premier soup dumpling blogger" - Foobooz

philadining.com

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Is the roll for a Beef on a Weck also dipped in the drippings of the roast?

I'll defer to any native Buffalonians, but that's not the practice at the approx 457 graduation parties, birthday parties. family reunions, retirement parties, weddings, christenings, etc that I've been to.

Most often, the beef itself is swimming in jus, (usually in a chafing dish next to the baked ziti) and then is loaded onto a roll by each person, maybe a little more jus drizzled on, but there's no extra taken for dipping. I don't think I've ever gotten any dipping liquid on the side at a restaurant either. But it is a pretty wet sandwich, so the effect is not too different from a french dip.

"Philadelphia’s premier soup dumpling blogger" - Foobooz

philadining.com

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And what's up with the fixation on Haddock?  Fish Fry is one thing, but I've even seen it on menus striving for gourmet heights, tarted-up in swanky presentations usually reserved for Chilean Sea Bass and Halibut in most modern kitchens.

I can't relate it to quantum physics, string theory or any other unifying principles but I can attest to the fact that few other fish, if any, offer up the same experience as genuine haddock when they're properly battered and deep fried.

Trying to gussy up haddock with panko bread crumbs, tempura batter or even beer batter yields a less satisfying product.

There should be just enough bread crumbs of just the right texture in the coating, with a hot enough oil that's been around the block a time or two but isn't yet dirty... to yield a slightly crispy exterior that totally seals in the moisture and flavor of the fish. Nary a drop of oiliness on the outside or inside but steaming bursts of flavor pop out when one takes a bite.

I've never had fish fry in a resataurant, even around here, that matches what the best fish fry joints offer. But the real insult is the places that use any number of different "flaky, tender white fish" varieties and try to pass it off as though it's the equal to haddock. Scrod, pollock and those other varieties might be fine for Mrs. Gorton's fish sticks but not for a real authentic fish fry.

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Also--Beef on a Weck is basically a French dip --the roll is special to Buffalo. My understanding is the French Dip originates from a place in Los Angeles. I am not sure of the timing.

That would be Philippe's back in 1918 according to their website. Is the roll for a Beef on a Weck also dipped in the drippings of the roast?

My experience is based on bars in the Ithaca area circa late '60's. There it was blood rare roast beef sliced very thin and heaped on a sandwich, maybe with a little but not a lot of au juice. Think Arbys with real roast beef, a roll of substance and real horseradish. And beer.

Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

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My experience is based on bars in the Ithaca area circa late '60's.  There it was blood rare roast beef sliced very thin and heaped on a sandwich, maybe with a little but not a lot of au juice.  Think Arbys with real roast beef, a roll of substance and real horseradish.  And beer.

That sounds like an excellent sandwich, but not what I've ever gotten. I think I'd prefer the version you describe, and I won't hazard a guess about what's "authentic", but every version I've been served, either in little diner-ish restaurants, bars, or at parties, has had the already-sliced beef floating in a pool of hot brothy jus, therefore not blood-rare, at least not for long... Certainly at parties, that was just part of the practicality of holding it on a buffet line, but even at restaurants, it's been the same. That said, I'm sure I've never had one at the actual point of origin, presumably at some bar in Buffalo.

Anyone have an opinion about where one can get the "ideal" version of a beef on wick/weck? And would the beef be rare?

"Philadelphia’s premier soup dumpling blogger" - Foobooz

philadining.com

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A purported recipe.

That's not the real recipe - Nick (the father) had to give it up at a card game years ago (he's since passed on)

I suspected something like that...

So Gordon, if you were jonesing for a garbage plate at 2am, (which is generally the only time they seem like a really good idea) where would you go?

Well...seeing as how the original Nick's closes at 9:00 now, you could visit the second location on Lyell Ave in Gates. The sauce is sweeter than the original (due to a heavy hand with the clove) but the mac salad is mass production variety. There are a slew of imitators i.e. - the rubbish plate, the trash plate, the dumpster plate, etc

For the true plate afficionado - Mark's on Monroe ave (must be after 12:30 when the night crew is on..don't ask) Some may argue Gitsis down the road but it pales by comparasion due to inferior burger patty quality.

Double cheeseburger plate, with well done fries and cold, runny mac salad, extra hot sauce (their recipe comes as close to the original Nick's as I've tasted but with slightly less heat) and a half bottle of ketchup on the whole mess. It wasn't so many years ago that I was bartending and it was a once a week ordeal. My personal favorite :biggrin:

edit - street address

Edited by GordonCooks (log)
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My experience is based on bars in the Ithaca area circa late '60's.  There it was blood rare roast beef sliced very thin and heaped on a sandwich, maybe with a little but not a lot of au juice.  Think Arbys with real roast beef, a roll of substance and real horseradish.  And beer.

That sounds like an excellent sandwich, but not what I've ever gotten. I think I'd prefer the version you describe, and I won't hazard a guess about what's "authentic", but every version I've been served, either in little diner-ish restaurants, bars, or at parties, has had the already-sliced beef floating in a pool of hot brothy jus, therefore not blood-rare, at least not for long... Certainly at parties, that was just part of the practicality of holding it on a buffet line, but even at restaurants, it's been the same. That said, I'm sure I've never had one at the actual point of origin, presumably at some bar in Buffalo.

Anyone have an opinion about where one can get the "ideal" version of a beef on wick/weck? And would the beef be rare?

I think you'd have a hard time finding beef on a wick in Ithaca anymore - I'm not aware of it being offered anywhere. Or a garbage plate for that matter.

Sadly I think Ithaca's most well-known contribution to the culinary world - other than legions of Hotelies of course - is... gasp, it pains me to say it... Moosewood. Yeesh.

I would love to believe that the Hot Truck / Stouffer's french bread pizza connection legend is true, however... that might trump Moosewood.

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My experience is based on bars in the Ithaca area circa late '60's.  There it was blood rare roast beef sliced very thin and heaped on a sandwich, maybe with a little but not a lot of au juice.  Think Arbys with real roast beef, a roll of substance and real horseradish.  And beer.

The sandwich Holly describes is exactly what they serve at Clark's Ale House here in Syracuse. Apart from offering a small paper plate of Limburger or NY State X-sharp cheddar with Saltines and sliced red onions, that very sandwich is the only food item they had for the first five years they were open (or thereabouts). The beef is sliced up fresh for every sandwich and is unquestionably the best roast beef I've ever had.

Bowing to popular demand they doubled the size of the menu a few years ago and now also offer roasted a turkey sandwich.

But no jukebox, no TV, no music, no video games, no pickup scene... just beer, ale and sandwiches. And a couple dartboards and plenty of conversation.

I think Ithaca's only notable food contribution that is verifiable is most likely to be Cornell Chicken.

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My experience is based on bars in the Ithaca area circa late '60's.  There it was blood rare roast beef sliced very thin and heaped on a sandwich, maybe with a little but not a lot of au juice.  Think Arbys with real roast beef, a roll of substance and real horseradish.  And beer.

That sounds like an excellent sandwich, but not what I've ever gotten. I think I'd prefer the version you describe, and I won't hazard a guess about what's "authentic", but every version I've been served, either in little diner-ish restaurants, bars, or at parties, has had the already-sliced beef floating in a pool of hot brothy jus, therefore not blood-rare, at least not for long... Certainly at parties, that was just part of the practicality of holding it on a buffet line, but even at restaurants, it's been the same. That said, I'm sure I've never had one at the actual point of origin, presumably at some bar in Buffalo.

Anyone have an opinion about where one can get the "ideal" version of a beef on wick/weck? And would the beef be rare?

I think you'd have a hard time finding beef on a wick in Ithaca anymore - I'm not aware of it being offered anywhere. Or a garbage plate for that matter.

I believe the sandwich I recall came from the Boxcar in Cayuga Heights where I spent far to many weekday nights.

Sadly I think Ithaca's most well-known contribution to the culinary world - other than legions of Hotelies of course - is... gasp, it pains me to say it... Moosewood.  Yeesh.

Hotelies are contribution enough. But I do love the above mentioned Cornell BBQ chicken. Not all that wild abut Moosewood though.

I would love to believe that the Hot Truck / Stouffer's french bread pizza connection legend is true, however... that might trump Moosewood.

Of course it's true. Maybe no basis of fact, but it's true.

Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

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  • 10 months later...

I know some of you get anxious without an occasional update on the state of the plate, so to soothe your nerves -

gallery_23992_2291_15813.jpg

To be scrupulously accurate, and trademark-sensitive, this is actually a trash plate served up by a little hot-dog/hamburger joint south of the city called Minnehan's. And it was tasty...

In another upstate garbage plate update: it was all over the news that Governor Spitzer's recent inauguration festivities featured a food court serving various NY foods, including Garbage Plates brought in from Nick Tahou, as well as Beef on Weck from Charlie the Butcher, Wings from the Anchor Bar, Barbecue from the Dinosaur, Knishes from Yonah Schimmel, and more. Sounds like a good party to me.

"Philadelphia’s premier soup dumpling blogger" - Foobooz

philadining.com

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In another upstate garbage plate update: it was all over the news that Governor Spitzer's recent inauguration festivities featured a food court serving various NY foods, including Garbage Plates brought in from Nick Tahou, as well as Beef on Weck from Charlie the Butcher, Wings from the Anchor Bar, Barbecue from the Dinosaur, Knishes from Yonah Schimmel, and more. Sounds like a good party to me.

Are you kidding me?? Beef on Weck, real wings, BBQ and Yonah Schimmel's knishes all in one place? Be still my food lustful and artery hardened heart! I'd be there in an arrhythmic heartbeat. :wink:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Anyone have an opinion about where one can get the "ideal" version of a beef on wick/weck? And would the beef be rare?

I was back in Buffalo to visit family for Thanksgiving. The wife and I made our requisite trip to the Buffalo Brew Pub, and for the first time, I got their Beef on Weck. Perfect. As I recall, it was quite similar to what was described... maybe not blood rare, but it was decidedly pink, and shaved "Arby's thin". Without a doubt, one of the best Beef on Wecks I've ever had.

On top of that, I'll take the Brew Pub's wings over the Anchor Bar any day of the week. Consistantly good size, perfectly crispy, and just the right amount of sauce... so the last one at the bottom of the pile is just as crispy as the first one. Awesome.

__Jason

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  • 3 weeks later...

Why am I not surprised that there's a Nick Tahou Hots Myspace page?

I'm sure it's not an official posting from the restaurant, just something from a fan of the Garbage Plate, but there are some amusing stories recounted there. I love how one of the "friends" listed waxes rhapsodic: "Ahhh...Nick Tahou's, one of the first places I ever got punched in the face!"

"Philadelphia’s premier soup dumpling blogger" - Foobooz

philadining.com

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It might be interesting to see a careful side-by-side comparison of the different local variations, but I’m not sure any mortal can eat more than one of these in a day. 

I lived in Rochester for years.

My record is two and a half in one sitting, all of em cheeseburger, and that's after not having had lunch or dinner the previous day.

HEAVEN.

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Wait a minute!  We Downstaters don't NEED Garbage Plates!  We've got this:

http://www.gothamist.com/archives/2007/01/...ito_gothami.php

(You know what?  I've actually EATEN one of those.  Years ago, in Jackson Heights.  I think I must have supressed the memory until I read that post.)

Can I do a garbage-sweetbread plate?

:raz:

That wasn't chicken

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this may sound terribly naive, but how do americans eat this sort of stuff without becoming horribly obese? Or are you supposed to throw it up afterwards? (or perhaps you don't have a choice).

errr, Americans *are* obese.

it would be naive to think that anyone would eat this sort of thing very often. obviously the occasional pig-out isn't going to impact health or weight very much. i would guess that a 9 course tasting at some restaurants are high-calorie high-fat propositions as well.

and yes, all Americans purge after meals.

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But I still think NYC reigns as America's skinniest city. So we earn our pig-outs. The best mental image for me is, it is mostly Middle America with the obesity problems, and that problem stems from eating too much from the middle of the supermarket (processed foods).... good rule of thumb is to just stick to what lines the walls!

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