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Chef's without cookbooks


SBonner
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Just finished reading the local thread on your favourite recipes cooked from local chef's books. Now who should write a cook book (B.C. chefs only) and what should be in it? I'm first off the bat with a book from Chef Jeff at Aurora for his great brunch contribution of Free range scrambled eggs with black truffles crowning a blanket of filo pastry nested upto some back bacon and slow oven roasted tomatoes :rolleyes:

Stephen Bonner

Edited by SBonner (log)

"who needs a wine list when you can get pissed on dessert" Gordon Ramsey Kitchen Nightmares 2005

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You mention Chef Jeff and brunch, and you don't include the duck bacon???

For shame!!

I'm a big fan of Chef's too, as he knows, and I would certainly buy a cookbook were he to produce one.

Andrey Durbach and Frank Pabst are the other two unbooked local chefs whose tips, tricks, and recipes I'd love to pore over.

Agenda-free since 1966.

Foodblog: Power, Convection and Lies

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You mention Chef Jeff and brunch, and you don't include the duck bacon???

For shame!!

I'm a big fan of Chef's too, as he knows, and I would certainly buy a cookbook were he to produce one.

Andrey Durbach and Frank Pabst are the other two unbooked local chefs whose tips, tricks, and recipes I'd love to pore over.

.....so sorry I did indeed forget the duck bacon :shock: Andrey would also be a great choice...

Stephen

"who needs a wine list when you can get pissed on dessert" Gordon Ramsey Kitchen Nightmares 2005

MY BLOG

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Two come immediately to mind: David Hawksworth and Virkam Vij - but they seem so obvious - do they have cook books out yet? God - to have access to Vikram's recipes... though I have seen his recipe for the lamb lollipops floating around (most recently in Mark Bittman's Best Recipes).

If I could get lab equiptment - Robert Clarke's recipes would be interesting - even from a strictly technical level.

And for dessert - a book by Thomas Haas (and to be in Ling's kitchen when she tests them all).

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Forgive me, as i dont know these cooks/proprietors by name . But a Memphis Blues cookbook would indeed be a worthy read. As would a Gyzoa king volume or two.

Both would surely provide an inspirational read, yielding a collection of some great flavourful recipes. And a unique insight into a character rich food and business philosophy.

Has Mr Vij authored a book ?

phnom penn ?

Or is there enough coffee table food porn out there, and do we really need to encourage more ?

tt
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I'd like to nominate the chef at Cioppino's as well.  :smile:

Agreed.

Pino`s book of kitchen insults and put downs.

I`d buy it .

I'm not familiar with the industry, but if the cookbook was peppered with insults and put-downs directed at the reader and his/her general incompetence in the kitchen, I'm sure it'd still sell. Channeling Tony Bourdain...? :wink:

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I would love to see Joe Fortes launch a West Coast Seafood Guide/Cookbook! When I was there we had HUGE buying power and we purchased over 120 different types of fish and 45 types of oysters!

What a great resource of seafood knowledge for the general (and industry) knowledge!!

Chef/Owner/Teacher

Website: Chef Fowke dot com

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How about "Vancouver Cooks"? I'm surprised it hasn't been mentioned. (or has it?) It includes a recipe from Parkside: Andrey Durbach, Roast Breast of Squab; from West: David Hawksworth, Braised Fillet of Halibut;Vij's, Vikram Vij, Marinated Lamb Popsicles etc. The foreword of this book was provided by John Bishop and the introduction by Jamie Maw. All proceeds from the sale of this book is supposed to be invested in the Chefs' Table Scholarship and Bursary Fund. Buy Now!

"One chocolate truffle is more satisfying than a dozen artificially flavored dessert cakes." Darra Goldstein, Gastronomica Journal, Spring 2005 Edition

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How about "Vancouver Cooks"? I'm surprised it hasn't been mentioned. (or has it?) It includes a recipe from Parkside: Andrey Durbach, Roast Breast of Squab; from West: David Hawksworth, Braised Fillet of Halibut;Vij's, Vikram Vij, Marinated Lamb Popsicles etc. The foreword of this book was provided by John Bishop and the introduction by Jamie Maw. All proceeds from the sale of this book is supposed to be invested in the Chefs' Table Scholarship and Bursary Fund. Buy Now!

There are copies of Vancouver Cooks still available at Barbara-Jo's. Thus far sales have raised more than $45,000 for the Chefs' Table Society scholarship and bursary program. Add in the $6,000 from the Trotter dinner, and it was a successful fundraising year. The website goes live in March.

Edited by jamiemaw (log)

from the thinly veneered desk of:

Jamie Maw

Food Editor

Vancouver magazine

www.vancouvermagazine.com

Foodblog: In the Belly of the Feast - Eating BC

"Profumo profondo della mia carne"

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I'd like to nominate the chef at Cioppino's as well.  :smile:

Agreed.

Pino`s book of kitchen insults and put downs.

I`d buy it .

I'm not familiar with the industry, but if the cookbook was peppered with insults and put-downs directed at the reader and his/her general incompetence in the kitchen, I'm sure it'd still sell. Channeling Tony Bourdain...? :wink:

Lorna, I think TFA was referring to the fact that while Pino is indeed a great chef, he is also quite well known in the industry as having a voice that carries far and wide. It's been heard by many servers at very close range.

I'm going there for dinner next month. It's been far too long.

Derek

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How about "Vancouver Cooks"? I'm surprised it hasn't been mentioned. (or has it?) It includes a recipe from Parkside: Andrey Durbach, Roast Breast of Squab; from West: David Hawksworth, Braised Fillet of Halibut;Vij's, Vikram Vij, Marinated Lamb Popsicles etc. The foreword of this book was provided by John Bishop and the introduction by Jamie Maw. All proceeds from the sale of this book is supposed to be invested in the Chefs' Table Scholarship and Bursary Fund. Buy Now!

Nice book...but I would prefer one book/one chef from start to finish. Just a personal thing when it comes to cook books.

Ralph

No culture exists without food and drink

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How about "Vancouver Cooks"? I'm surprised it hasn't been mentioned. (or has it?) It includes a recipe from Parkside: Andrey Durbach, Roast Breast of Squab; from West: David Hawksworth, Braised Fillet of Halibut;Vij's, Vikram Vij, Marinated Lamb Popsicles etc. The foreword of this book was provided by John Bishop and the introduction by Jamie Maw. All proceeds from the sale of this book is supposed to be invested in the Chefs' Table Scholarship and Bursary Fund. Buy Now!

Nice book...but I would prefer one book/one chef from start to finish. Just a personal thing when it comes to cook books.

Ralph

You may be waiting a while then Ralph: The economics of regional cookbooks in Canada are very slim indeed for the author, even for a best seller. Typically, they serve a purpose of brand extension or, in a more altruistic sense, are a labour of love.

A regional best seller such as Vancouver Cooks has returned about $45,000 in two printings, but only because virtually all organizational, editorial, recipe-testing and marketing/promotional time and materials was either volunteered, donated or discounted. We called in a lot of markers and several of us spent hundreds of hours each on the project over a year and a half.

Further, the photography and food styling (normally, an expensive part of the process) was mainly paid for via contra (gift certificates) from the participating chefs' restaurants.

But wait, there's more. In addition to a spirited marketing campaign (media and chefs' signings organized by culinary PR firms attached to the restaurants), the book was sold in each of the 54 particpating restaurants, with Barbara-jo supplying small lot distribution services from her warehouse. Vikram Vij single-handedly sold more than 250 books. This effort was a logistical challenge, but it increased sales dramatically, taking the book quickly into a second printing.

Thank the power of the collaborative.

Chefs are busy and get tired. Extra-curricular work is tough. It can be done, but it takes at least 18 months of diligent and often frustrating work in return for not much except satisfaction. That's why I admire Messrs. Bishop, Raye, Couton, Feenie et al for their contributions.

Admire but don't envy.

Jamie

Edited by jamiemaw (log)

from the thinly veneered desk of:

Jamie Maw

Food Editor

Vancouver magazine

www.vancouvermagazine.com

Foodblog: In the Belly of the Feast - Eating BC

"Profumo profondo della mia carne"

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Jamie,

Your comments on the economics of cook book publishing in our small niche market is very interesting but bang on. I remember in Spain looking at buying Carles Abellan's Tapas from Comerc 24 and the molecular "food porn" gastronomy of Ferran Adria (with a companion VCD) both retailing for 35 Euro's and $150 Euro's and that's with the E.U. as a market place. I guess like food prices our local cook books offer pretty good value.

Cheers,

Stephen

"who needs a wine list when you can get pissed on dessert" Gordon Ramsey Kitchen Nightmares 2005

MY BLOG

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Chefs are busy and get tired. Extra-curricular work is tough. It can be done, but it takes at least 18 months of diligent and often frustrating work in return for not much except satisfaction. That's why I admire Messrs. Bishop, Raye, Couton, Feenie et al for their contributions.

Jamie

You couldn't be more right Jamie. We've had an idea in the works for a while. But when all you do is cook, shop for food, sleep, and try to maintain a relationship with your spouse, writing a book is the last thing on your mind.

That said, we have been compiling recipes, photos and stories from the special dinners we have done, and hope to make a book out of them. Each dinner would become a chapter.

We'll see what happens.

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Chefs are busy and get tired. Extra-curricular work is tough. It can be done, but it takes at least 18 months of diligent and often frustrating work in return for not much except satisfaction. That's why I admire Messrs. Bishop, Raye, Couton, Feenie et al for their contributions.

Jamie

You couldn't be more right Jamie. We've had an idea in the works for a while. But when all you do is cook, shop for food, sleep, and try to maintain a relationship with your spouse, writing a book is the last thing on your mind.

That said, we have been compiling recipes, photos and stories from the special dinners we have done, and hope to make a book out of them. Each dinner would become a chapter.

We'll see what happens.

oops. I'm chef jeff, not Kurtis

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Chef Jeff,

Put me on the list for the book :smile: whenever that happens to be...until then I'll just have to eat at Aurora more often :smile:

Cheers,

Stephen

"who needs a wine list when you can get pissed on dessert" Gordon Ramsey Kitchen Nightmares 2005

MY BLOG

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Lorna, I think TFA was referring to the fact that while Pino is indeed a great chef, he is also quite well known in the industry as having a voice that carries far and wide.  It's been heard by many servers at very close range.

I'm going there for dinner next month.  It's been far too long.

Thanks for the clarification--sorry if I misinterpreted TFA's comment. :smile:

I haven't had a full dinner at The Bearfoot for awhile, but I would be interested in seeing Melissa put out a book, just based on the dishes she offered last night. She is a very talented young woman who has the respect, love, and admiration of the staff there.

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Has Mr Vij authored a book ?

I believe one is in the works. From Barbara Jo's website March 13 (already Sold Out) is a ''sneak peak of Vikram's first book''.

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The Art of Simple Food by Alice Waters

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The 100-Mile Diet by Alisa Smith & J. B. MacKinnon

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Chefs are busy and get tired. Extra-curricular work is tough. It can be done, but it takes at least 18 months of diligent and often frustrating work in return for not much except satisfaction. That's why I admire Messrs. Bishop, Raye, Couton, Feenie et al for their contributions.

I wonder how much of that work is making the recipes 'home friendly'? It must be a tonne of work to rescope proportions and ingredients. Then again - Trotter and Keller's cookbooks seem designed to present a challenge to home cooks who are up for it.

It will be interesting to see what path Tojo's takes.

Edited by canucklehead (log)
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