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Le Creuset Sizes


constanela
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Here it is the day after Thanksgiving, I'm close to the Gilroy outlets thanks to a weekend spent with family and I've decided today is the day to finally invest in a Le Creuset oven for brasing.

I headed over to the Le Creuset outlet and quickly became confused over all the various sizes, shapes and styles. Things that sounded huge (like the 6 quart ovens) look tiny in the store, but the 9 quart ovens seem like they might be too big.

What's the best size for a family of 2 adults that like to have leftovers for lunch? Anybody have some advice?

Erin Andersen

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I have either a six or 9.5 qt oval. It will hold 4 lamb shanks or 4 turkey legs. It's not here right now but is is very heavy empty and you don't want to move it far when it's full. A really good investment though.

Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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For a family of two adults and occassionally a child, i have a 7 1/2 qt round a 5 1/2 round and a 5/2 braisier. Depends on what you want to braise. For chops and ribs, the brasier works best for me. For larger pot roasts the big round and for smaller ones the smaller round. I have to say I use all three constantly

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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You'll probably end up with more than one, but from the information you have given us I would suggest about a 6 quart oval. The oval shape works best with some cuts of meat, and stews and such do not care what shape they are cooked in. If you like them, you may end up wanting 2-3 quart and 9 1/2 quart sizes, too. That would give you a pretty good spread for many applications.

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I was given a round VERY LARGE pot as a gift; I think it's the one that retails for $300 or so. After many years of use, I'd say you are better off with an oval one (fits cuts much better and I'm sure braises will come out even better). I love my pot, but unless you are cooking for a crowd (of for keeps) that's too big. I wish I had a smaller one.

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After polling family and friends, we all agree that the 6 3/4 quart oval is the most versatile. It holds a chicken and the most useful sizes of roasts and such. Like Richard said, it works fine for stews as well. For most of us, this was our first piece.

That being said, the new love of my LC life is my little 2 1/2 quart oval. I live alone and it is terrific for 4 chicken thighs, a small roast or a 1/2 pound of oven cooked beans.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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I guess for the three of us, I've just never seen the need for an oval. But then, I'm not overly fond of braised chicken! I also love the little 2 1/2 quart LC.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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What's the best size for a family of 2 adults that like to have leftovers for lunch?  Anybody have some advice?

It is just two of us here also. I have three different sizes of LC dutch ovens. I want to say they are 5 and 9 qt round and 15 qt oval (the largest they make). We use them a lot from making tomato sauce, to boiling potatoes and cooking pasta. We leave the middle size one on top of the stoev so it is ready anytime.

I wanted a larger one than the 9 qt for ages. When we braise shanks, I find that it is a little small. We generally make four or more shanks at a time and it gets crowded. At one point we had signed up for the mailings at the outlet store in Kittery, ME and we kept getting coupons and notices of sales. One of the coupons was for a 35% (thirty five) discount. It was at that point we bought the 15 qt oval. Another coupon came in the mail a week ago.

Dan

Edited by dans (log)
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Color can be an issue. :laugh:

I started with a dark green, not quite as dark as British Racing Green. Then they quit making it. I switched to white because I like the way it looks, enough so that I will spend a few bucks more to get it if need be. My son takes a different approach. He is just starting his collection and has decided on a riotous mixture. He likes the solid look of the granite for his 6 3/4 oval. Then, when I offered the 2 1/2 quart for a gift, he chose the red.

But, for now, I am trying to figure out how dans lifts that monster to make pasta. And, a better question might be . . . why?:blink:

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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I also have them in several colors. It does make for a colorful kitchen, and I have also saved quite a bit by shopping for whatever color happened to be on sale at Amazon or W-S in a size I wanted...I typically save 60 - 75%.

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I have one from an outlet in Flemington, NJ. It is the 13 qt round in dark blue. It was also considered a "2nd" due to some barely perceptible imperfections on the finish. It was a great buy due to the outlet price, "2nds" discount and a coupon I had for the outlet shops. It is very heavy empty, so I must stay strong and healthy if I want to keep filling it up! Even though I usually cook for two, I never do without making at least double or triple the recipe for leftovers. This is especially true for soups and stews. It's a great pot to have when cooking for a crowd.

KathyM

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But, for now, I am trying to figure out how dans lifts that monster to make pasta. And, a better question might be . . . why?:blink:

It isn't that bad to lift it. It's only when it's full that it gets really heavy. I use it mainly for brasing so I've never really had to lift a hot heavy pot too far. Into the oven and out again. My 18 qt stock pot is worse, but it has a spigot so I never lift that full either.

Dan

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I have several enameled cast iron, not just Le Cruset but Descoware (purchased in the 60s), Chasseur (purchased in the 70s), a couple of no-name, and Staub.

These range from a small 2 3/4 quart Descoware to the biggest Staub - usefull only if you have help to lift it.

The most versatile sizes for most recipes range from 6 to 8 quart so I think you are wise in sticking to something around that size.

I happen to like the oval (French) ovens better than the round for roasting poultry, hams, roasts, etc., however that is simply personal preference.

The round (Dutch) ovens are fine for soups, stews and chili, however few things are perfectly round and if I want to do some basting with pan juices, there always seems to be that space at either end of the oval oven that is just the right size to fit a basting spoon.

gallery_17399_60_181410.jpg

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I got a 7-1/4 quart LC Doufeu for about 1/3 off at an LC outlet is September. It's been perfect for large and small cuts. It's a beast to lift, but you don't have to put it in the oven. The lid has nibs on the bottom like the Staub and is indented to hold ice or water, so it works perfectly on the stovetop.

I'm starting a large pork butt in it tonight, which should be done in the morning.

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I have no idea what a quart is (I'm in the UK) but I find the 27cm oval casserole brilliant for two people. It fits legs of lamb, whole 2kg chickens and large pieces of beef in.

The oval shape fits joints of meat more snugly than a round one meaning less scorching and less liquid needed.

Colour - well, you take your pick. I went for the classic orange. :raz:

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I have 3... a large deep frying pan shape (red), a 4.5 quart (pretty blue) and a 2.6 quart side (gray). All are round. All very useful for different things.

I've got the variety of colors and like that. It's fun and it's easier to remember what pot I've used when I make something again.

Edited to add that we serve 2 adults and 2 small kids.

Edited by Cusina (log)

What's wrong with peanut butter and mustard? What else is a guy supposed to do when we are out of jelly?

-Dad

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  • 4 months later...

does anybody know which is equivalent to what?

i found this (each line is a pot) and id ilke to know what the equivalent usa quart sizes are:

rounds:

16x7cm / 6.33 x 3" (NEW)", 1.3L/2.25pt Capacity

18 x 9cm / 7.25 x 3.5"", 1.8L/3.25pt Capacity

20 x 9cm / 8 x 3.5", 2.4L/4.25pt Capacity

22 x 9.5cm / 8.75 x 3.75", 3.3L/5.75pt Capacity

24 x 10cm / 9.5 x 4"", 4.2L/7.5pt Capacity

26 x 10.75cm / 10.25 x 4.25", 5.3L/9.25pt Capacity

28 x 11.25cm / 11 x 4.5", 6.7L/11.75pt Capacity

30 x 12.75cm / 11.75 x 5", 8.4L/14.75pt Capacity

ovals:

23 x 18 x 9cm / 9.25 x 7 x 3.5" Capacity 2.6L / 4.5pt

25 x 20 x 9cm / 10 x 8 x 3.5" Capacity 3.2L / 5.75pt

27 x 21.5 x 10cm / 11 x 8.5 x 4" Capacity 4.1L / 7.25pt

29 x 23 x 10cm / 11.25 x 9 x 4" Capacity 4.7L / 8.25pt

31 x 24.75 x 11.5cm / 12.25 x 9.75 x 4.5" Capacity 6.3L / 11pt

i know that:

Size: 1.9L/3.25pt capacity = USA 2 quart

i tried conversions online using pints and quarts, but i didnt get anywhere since on the online conversion calculator there were US dry and liquid quarts and UK dry and liquid pints and so on and so on.... anybody with some clue and doesnt need to guess?

"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo
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Melonpan: There are two pints in a U.S. liquid quart (and two cups in a pint, if that doesn't muddy the waters). To a first approximation, one liter = one quart. ...

Ahem!

There are indeed 2 US pints in a US quart.

And just as Melonpan said there are about 3.25 {UK} pints in 2 US quarts...

(I presume everyone knows Google will do such conversions for you - just type in the expression in the search box - like -

6.75 quarts in litres

or

2 quarts in UK pints

Melonpan, I haven't had a clue which sizes they were referring to either!

The round casseroles are (as you listed) in even number centimeter diameter sizes.

The ovals are odd numbers of centimeters length.

That size number (centimeters) is *cast* into the underside of the pan lids and the underside of the centre of the pan base - can it be different in the US?

Looking at Melonpan's table, I'd suggest that the 6.75 US Quart Oval that is so popular, is probably the 6.3 litre "31cm" model...

FWIW, ovals are for taking whole chickens without excessive liquid (but are fine for ordinary braises and stews), rounds fit better on the stovetop, and take the heat of a conventional stovetop burner more evenly.

Both are offered for sale so as to satisfy personal preference. And as to whether something is considered awkwardly heavy, that'll depend greatly on the strength of the individual.

I have a (round so even number) "20cm" thing. Its great for one or two people, but that's it!

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

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This site has a very easy conversion system for all measures. U.S./ Imperial/metric.

You type the original amount in one area, click on the equal sign and all the other windows show the equivalents.

The Imperial pint is indeed signifiantly larger than the U.S. pint.

Regarding other measurements, if you use any Australian recipes, you have to convert differently for the tablespoon measure - in the U.S. and U.K. a tablespoon is 15 ml. in Australia it is 20 ml., a significant difference.

I would like to add that the Innova cast iron - enamelled cookware is very reasonably priced and is very well made. This 5-quart round is an excellent buy. I have given these as gifts and I have one that I use in my barbecue outdoors.

For those who can't afford the expense of Le Cruset, Staub and Chasseur, this is a good choice.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I am thinking of investing in a Le Creuset (my first) so all your inputs have been really helpful. I was going to get the 5 qt round one but I think I will get a bigger one now. Can anyone help with the following questions? Thanks.

Are all the pans white on the inside?

Do the colors have any diference to cooking time at all or can I make my choice purely on what pleases my eye and purse? :biggrin:

Are soup pots OK for braising? (there is one on sale now) What are the difference between it and the round French Oven? Is it shallower?

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Are soup pots OK for braising? (there is one on sale now) What are the difference between it and the round French Oven? Is it shallower?

I have a 2.5 qt soup pot which is the perfect size for making a pot of beans, using a standard 1# beans, in the oven or stovetop. Being half the capactiy of my 5qt French oven, it is somewhat smaller in height and width. The sides are curved out then inward from base to top, rather than being straight-ish in the French oven one.

It could do a small braise, saving the French oven for a big braise - get 'em both, you won't regret it. And get them at an outlet - especially if you can wait for one of the semiannual sales - huge discounts and I always buy carefully from the back room where the "seconds" are - minor cosmetic blemishes that have absolutely no effect on cooking with them. IIRC, I got my 5quart French Oven for about $70 when all was said and done.

Edited by memesuze (log)
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Are all the pans white on the inside?

No...I bought the 2 quart Round Oven in Satin Black, and it's black on the inside, and doesn't seem as smooth as the pans with the creme colored insides. I haven't cooked in it yet though, so I'm not sure if it will make a difference for sticking or clean-up (I suspect it will though :sad: ).

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