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CtznCane

Le Creuset

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I scored. At Marshall's. I got a 2-1/2 quart for $24.99. The catch was that the lid and the pot don't match, which doesn't bother me in the least.

The bottom is sort of a graduated red -- more red on top, more burgundy on the bottom and the lid is greyish. This is great because it mimics the colors of my counters.

Yes, I scored. It is not a second, just unmatched pieces. I did a bargain with the store manager because these pieces were just laying there. I figured if I named a price less than the two unmatched (color-wise pieces) the worst that could happen was that she would say "no, you have to pay full price (which would have been $49.99).


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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In case anyone is interested, Target, on the web only, has the Innova 7 quart roaster for $59.99.

Green Innova pot only at present.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Nothing new to add about LC vs. Lodge. Each have their attributes, as others have pointed out. Tomato based things do better in the enameled interior rather than plain cast IMO.

I love my well seasoned cast iron pans, dutch ovens, double sided grill pan as well as all of my Le Creuset collection (which is small... but slowly growing).

I'm not set on a particular color of LC, so that makes my choices fairly flexible, based on need and size.

I just wanted to show some LC "porn" if you will. Some recent aquistions from Caplan Duval ( hubby ordered and surprised me :wub: ) :

gallery_11353_303_1099171721.jpg

Also... my brother picked this up for me recently at a flea market. It appears to be in "never used condition". It included the care booklet as well as those rubber protector thingies. Best part about the fact that brother thought about and bought it for me :wub: ... it was only $17.00 = Priceless!!!

gallery_11353_303_1099171648.jpg

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I love the LC specialties like the peppers, tomato and such. Have you seen the eggplant? I have a lustful need for the garlic. I am not at all sure what I would use these for but they are charming.

(How cool that your brother thought to snag that tomato for you, peanutgirl.)


Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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I love the LC specialties like the peppers, tomato and such. Have you seen the eggplant? I have a lustful need for the garlic. I am not at all sure what I would use these for but they are charming.

(How cool that your brother thought to snag that tomato for you, peanutgirl.)

I've seen them all... and feel the need to have them all as well. Lustfull thinking I know.

Yes, I am lucky to have a brother to think so much of what I like :cool: to think of me and actually buy it for me (at what a great price did I mention!!!). I do feed him well when he's home though :wub: .

He frequents fleas & fairs quite often, as he is a guess what... Fresh Roasted Peanut Vendor!

If you're so inclined, look at Holly Moore's site under Eating State Fairs. His peanut stand happened to be in NC in Holly's picture... as well as the signs; hand painted by me.

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I ordered the small oval for myself last week from Amazon. It appears the price has gone up now, so glad I got the better deal.

This evening I'm looking at Amazon to see what might be available for Christmas gifts. Of course my eye was drawn to the Le Creuset section. They have this lovely 4 1/2 quart Soup Pot (lovely for bean-baking, too!) on sale for $99.99. AND, shipping is free! AND, they have a deal where if you order $120 of kitchen items, you get $20 off. So, basically, you could order something else in the $20 range and get it for free...

I wouldn't mind at all if Santa brought me this pot!

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detai...itchen&n=507846

Editing to add: My shopping spree is complete. I ordered the 4 1/2 quart soup pot at $99.99, and received a FREE Le Creuset 9 1/2 inch nonstick omelet pan. I also ordered the Microplane Coarse Grater and an Exopat, and got both of them free (except for about $4). FREE SHIPPING and I paid $111.73 for all of the above (I pay tax now?)

Now my big question -- is the non-stick omelette pan any good? I have calphalon omelette and saute pans and like them just fine. I'm thinking the LC omelette might make a nice gift for someone....


Edited by msphoebe (log)

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I ordered the small oval for myself last week from Amazon.  It appears the price has gone up now, so glad I got the better deal.

Same here, the retail prices stayed the same but the little oval went up $13 and the rectangular pan I got went up by $20. $33 in savings thanks to the good folks who participated in this thread. Thank you!

I plan on putting both of them to good use tomorrow thanks to the FedEx driver and Amazon.com getting them to me today.

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Ditto everything positive said here about LC. I have five pieces, all of which I use regularly and pretty much love. Designchick88 said,

If price is your biggest obstacle, and you have a Marshall's or TJ Maxx near you, they sometimes get pieces of Le Creuset.

I second that -- and would add that there is a truckload of LC knock-off items made by, of all people, Paul Bocuse that has popped up at our local TJMaxx. Does anyone have any of this stuff?


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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The Paul Bocuse is simply a less expensive line made by the same French firm that makes Staub. I have one French oven made by this company under yet a third name. (There is a thread here wherein we figured out the mystery of its provenance.) They are fine. Mine is a 2 3/4 or 3 quart model and I use it frequently for making beans. The only problem I have with them is the same problem I have with the Staub -- the dark interiors, which make it difficult to impossible to tell what's going on in the bottom of the pot. And it doesn't clean up as well as my LCs.

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Ditto everything positive said here about LC. I have five pieces, all of which I use regularly and pretty much love. Designchick88 said,
If price is your biggest obstacle, and you have a Marshall's or TJ Maxx near you, they sometimes get pieces of Le Creuset.

I second that -- and would add that there is a truckload of LC knock-off items made by, of all people, Paul Bocuse that has popped up at our local TJMaxx. Does anyone have any of this stuff?

I have 2 pieces - a 3 quart round oven and a 5+ quart oval oven. They are similar to the Staub black matte line. I've noticed that the edges where the lid and oven make contact aren't as well enameled - you have to make sure that these get dried well after you wash them. Otherwise, I've been very pleased with the way they perform. They were a lot less expensive than LC and seemed a little lighter in weight than the corresponding LC sizes.

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So far no one has mentioned Le Creuset's buffet casseroles, which have become my favorite (well at least tied with my 5.5 quart casserole). The buffet casseroles are shaped much like a deep skillet but with two short handles instead of one long handle. The lid is more domed than the usual LC lids. They're the best vessel ever for braising meats. I got the 5 quart and liked it so much I got the 3.5 quart one as well (although I don't use that one much).

[i should probably issue a disclaimer here that I get most of my Le Creuset free from LC incentive programs at the store where I work, so I've got more than any sane person needs. I've even got four of the "mini-cocottes" -- how sick is that? But they are cute.]

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Well I have gotten their catalog now (through online they mailed it) and now I"m sure it is just a matter of time till when I can drive up to Vacaville to the outlet store. Or Gilroy, perhaps as a drive down to Carmel with a stop doesn't sound like too bad a day trip.


Charles a food and wine addict - "Just as magic can be black or white, so can addictions be good, bad or neither. As long as a habit enslaves it makes the grade, it need not be sinful as well." - Victor Mollo

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I've even got four of the "mini-cocottes" -- how sick is that?

Sick? Not sick at all! I saw those at W-S (I think) and went AWWWWWW! Then I immediately tried to think of a way to use them. I haven't thought of a good enough use to spend the money but I still want them. :biggrin:


Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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That sort of thing is perfect when you want to serve individual portions of something like mussels. I also find that it's good to have several ~1 quart pots around for warming sauces, doing individual portions of vegetables, etc.


--

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The LC is my pride and joy. Colors come and go, and it's not such a big deal to me anymore..now I have gold, red and 2 (yes 2) different greens. the last deal was for a pate pan from the outlet store in Foley Ala., 85$ and doesn't match a thing, and I've only made pate twice in 25 years....but I fell in love. Anyone have a good easy recipe that doesn't require that I fly to France and force feed a duck?

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I've never owned or cooked with LC. The white enamel interior has scared me off, because my experience with enamel cookware has been that it sticks. Terribly. Browning meats = brown spots all over the bottom, and deglazing doesn't help. I think this has been my experience even since I learned really how to control the cooking temperature and deglaze the pan afterward.

Now, Anna N and one or two others have referred to a similar problem, but many more of you have referred to the ease of cleanup. I'd like some more info here, from any and all of you. What exactly are you cooking? Are you browning meats (or onions or whatever) in the same LC for your stews and braises? Are you living happily with brown stains on the interior of your pans? When you say "ease of cleanup" do you mean "compared to cast iron"? How would you compare the ease of cleanup of LC to ease of cleanup of a stainless steel interior pan? Is the mass of the cooking surface a factor? To be fair, I may never have cooked in a *heavy* enameled pot; I know that our only enameled pot at present is a lightweight thing suitable (IMO) only for boiling water and looking pretty atop the cabinets.

Translation of the above: I really don't need any LC. Thanks to this thread I'm now intrigued, but still leery. Fifi, you're gonna have to work a bit harder to suck me in on this one. :raz:


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I cook meats, fish,make sauces, etc with my LC and have never had a sticking problem.I find clean up is easy compared to any other types of cookware.The weight of the large pans and dutch ovens can be a nuisance, but I'm just used to it by now.

I've used LC for close to tewnty years now and perfer it to all other types of cookware.But, It took a little while to get used to the weight and it's a bility to retain heat.

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I've never owned or cooked with LC.  The white enamel interior has scared me off, because my experience with enamel cookware has been that it sticks.  Terribly.  Browning meats = brown spots all over the bottom, and deglazing doesn't help.  I think this has been my experience even since I learned really how to control the cooking temperature and deglaze the pan afterward.

Now, Anna N and one or two others have referred to a similar problem, but many more of you have referred to the ease of cleanup.  I'd like some more info here, from any and all of you.  What exactly are you cooking?  Are you browning meats (or onions or whatever) in the same LC for your stews and braises?  Are you living happily with brown stains on the interior of your pans?  When you say "ease of cleanup" do you mean "compared to cast iron"?  How would you compare the ease of cleanup of LC to ease of cleanup of a stainless steel interior pan?  Is the mass of the cooking surface a factor?  To be fair, I may never have cooked in a *heavy* enameled pot; I know that our only enameled pot at present is a lightweight thing suitable (IMO) only for boiling water and looking pretty atop the cabinets.

Translation of the above: I really don't need any LC.  Thanks to this thread I'm now intrigued, but still leery.  Fifi, you're gonna have to work a bit harder to suck me in on this one.  :raz:

Gauntlet thrown down and challenge accepted. :laugh:

My oldest LC is about 15 years old. My sister has one that is at least 25. No... I don't tolerate brown spots on the bottom. My interiors are as spotless as the day they arrived and I have a bunch of white white pieces 'cause I am into white and like the way it looks with my porcelain. I don't have a lot of stainless but my experience with my few pieces and friends' All-Clad... I would rather clean LC any day. If I am doing a braise, say for instance beef short ribs, I like to brown it really well then add the liquid and other stuff. The heaviness of the LC does a magnificent job of that and does so evenly. I will say that it is recommended that when browning on top of the stove you should cut the heat down a notch with LC... if you would normally use Med High, go to Medium. A few weeks ago, I had a carnitas disaster. I forgot about them and had carnitas al carbon, heavy on the carbon because I had added some OJ concentrate to try a slightly sweeter note. I am talking sticky greasy black gunk. A soak and then an application of Dawn Power Dissolver (well, ok, two applications) and things were good as new. I have seen a bit of stain from paprika chicken in one of my white pots but a quick soak in a clorox solution took care of that in about 10 minutes. One thing that does annoy me, especially on my white pieces, is the metal marks from ss utensils. But I understand, from Marlene I think, that the LC cleaner takes care of that. I will have to get some.

The weight and heat retention properties are the key to the cooking properties, I think. And the enamel interior is the key to the clean-up. You just don't want to abuse it. That means no abrasive cleansers or pot scrubbers. Let the LC care recommendations be your guide.

Yes... You really need some LC. You will never regret it. :biggrin:


Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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If you only have experience with enamel coated steel, the LC enamel coated cast iron is a completely different kitchen animal. I agree with all that Linda has said, except ---

One thing that does annoy me, especially on my white pieces, is the metal marks from ss utensils.

:shock:

As LC owner's guide says, use only wood or nylon/plastic/silicon utensils on LCs.

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:shock:

As LC owner's guide says, use only wood or nylon/plastic/silicon utensils on LCs.

You mean I am supposed to read the manual??? :blink:


Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Yes... You really need some LC. You will never regret it. :biggrin:

<looks around for waffling emoticon> Well, my favorite onion-and-sorrel panade DOES call for a flameproof casserole dish... :huh::hmmm:


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Yes... You really need some LC. You will never regret it. :biggrin:

<looks around for waffling emoticon> Well, my favorite onion-and-sorrel panade DOES call for a flameproof casserole dish... :huh::hmmm:

BWAHAHAHAHA!

Did I mention up-thread that the cast iron gratins are without equal? When I got one at Jeffery Steingarten's urging in his essay on potatoes daupinoise, I fell in love with gratins. You know the old saying... "If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail." For a while there, I was gratining (is that a verb?) everything in sight. :biggrin:


Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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I've never owned or cooked with LC.  The white enamel interior has scared me off, because my experience with enamel cookware has been that it sticks.  Terribly.  Browning meats = brown spots all over the bottom, and deglazing doesn't help.  I think this has been my experience even since I learned really how to control the cooking temperature and deglaze the pan afterward.

Now, Anna N and one or two others have referred to a similar problem, but many more of you have referred to the ease of cleanup.  I'd like some more info here, from any and all of you.  What exactly are you cooking?  Are you browning meats (or onions or whatever) in the same LC for your stews and braises?  Are you living happily with brown stains on the interior of your pans?  When you say "ease of cleanup" do you mean "compared to cast iron"?  How would you compare the ease of cleanup of LC to ease of cleanup of a stainless steel interior pan?  Is the mass of the cooking surface a factor?  To be fair, I may never have cooked in a *heavy* enameled pot; I know that our only enameled pot at present is a lightweight thing suitable (IMO) only for boiling water and looking pretty atop the cabinets.

Translation of the above: I really don't need any LC.  Thanks to this thread I'm now intrigued, but still leery.  Fifi, you're gonna have to work a bit harder to suck me in on this one.  :raz:

Stuff does stick to the enamel. Whenever I'm cooking onions or browning meat, I always wind up with crud on the bottom. Most, but not all, of it comes off during the deglazing process. However, cleanup does not seem ot be that much of a problem. I let it soak overnight or I use the degreaser which works great. I use the LC cleanser once in a while to bring the inside back to "like new" condition. Sometimes I'll cook my onions or brown the meat in something else and transfer it to the LC. There is nothing like braising in one of those babies.

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Yes... You really need some LC. You will never regret it. :biggrin:

<looks around for waffling emoticon> Well, my favorite onion-and-sorrel panade DOES call for a flameproof casserole dish... :huh::hmmm:

BWAHAHAHAHA!

Did I mention up-thread that the cast iron gratins are without equal? When I got one at Jeffery Steingarten's urging in his essay on potatoes daupinoise, I fell in love with gratins. You know the old saying... "If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail." For a while there, I was gratining (is that a verb?) everything in sight. :biggrin:

<Fifi sets the hook> :shock: Damn, that's what I've been cooking lately! I discovered some great gratin recipes recently, and the only thing that's been getting me away from it is the Cajun thread. :laugh:


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Yes... You really need some LC. You will never regret it. :biggrin:

<looks around for waffling emoticon> Well, my favorite onion-and-sorrel panade DOES call for a flameproof casserole dish... :huh::hmmm:

BWAHAHAHAHA!

Did I mention up-thread that the cast iron gratins are without equal? When I got one at Jeffery Steingarten's urging in his essay on potatoes daupinoise, I fell in love with gratins. You know the old saying... "If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail." For a while there, I was gratining (is that a verb?) everything in sight. :biggrin:

Fifi, is that essay somewhere on eGullet? I went back upthread looking for a link, and then looked at his Q&A, and didn't see the essay (or a link). If not, do you remember where you read that essay?

Edited for clarification.


Edited by Smithy (log)

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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