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Desserts w/ Pork


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I will be entertaining a group of friends, the theme of the day will be pork. .Every dish I will make will have pork in it.. I am going to be making interesting uncommon dishes. so I want the dessert to match.. . I was thinking butterscoth,chocolate,white chocolate bacon tastes.. Caramel bacon.. Would love all your help..

Edited by Daniel (log)
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Well then. I am going to have to ask you for a top to bottom on this one.. I am looking for word origin, etymology, what place served it, and so on.. With a couple photos to boot..

Edited by Daniel (log)
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The pies are very similar to Hostess apple pies/lemon pies/blueberry pies except that the secret ingredient is lard in the pie crust mixture. That's why they only had a shelf life of several days and couldnt be shipped outside the New Orleans area.

Besides the hand pies Simon Hubig made full size pies as well with the same general ingredients.

gallery_2_0_17106.jpg

http://lalagniappe.com/mall/lobby_hubigs_pies.htm

Actually come to think of it, looking at the ingredient list, it says Beef Tallow/Beef Fat as the animal fat used... But I don't see why you cant use lard. Traditionally Cornish Pasties were made that way.

Hell, put lard in the crust and deep fry the suckers in beef tallow. Damn that would be good.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Oh my g-d.. So, I am thinking of making a frozen bacon ice cream pie (lard crust), with chocolate and butterscotch bacon bits sprinkled on top.. As one of my desserts

Edited by Daniel (log)
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Apple tarts w/crisp, salty rendered lardons, and a dark caramel,

and the more I think about this, w/prunes and a Calvados glaze,

or figs, quartered and drenched in a hot, sweet bacon vinaigrette, the whole on a drift of mascarpone w/crumbled amaretti. Crisped bacon crumbled and scattered over all (recommend applewood smoked.

Theabroma

Edited by theabroma (log)

Sharon Peters aka "theabroma"

The lunatics have overtaken the asylum

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Oh my g-d

LOL. Now, why bother with the dash in the middle if you're talking about cooking BACON? You think he's gonna think twice about striking you down with a bolt of lightning after eating trayf like that if you remember to put in the dash?

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Oh my g-d

LOL. Now, why bother with the dash in the middle if you're talking about cooking BACON?

Me eating bacon isnt equal to screwing with a mans name.. :hmmm: As it works out in my value system..

Edited by Daniel (log)
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I think the trayf thing has to do with the gentleman who travels w/5 full sets of dentures. As he explains to his eyebrow-arching hostess: one set, milchig, one fleischig, the other set the same, but for Passover. When she inquired about the fifth set, he replies with a shrug, " for when I get that occasional yen for pork!" For me, trayf is how I see it until I got the ganas for it real bad. Good thing chocolate is/can be kosher, otherwise, there'd not be any women keeping kosher!

Maybe for dessert one of those Albert Adria pulled sugar raviolis filled with bacon crisps and egg foam, w/a red eye gravy sauce?

Theabroma

Sharon Peters aka "theabroma"

The lunatics have overtaken the asylum

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I think the trayf thing has to do with the gentleman who travels w/5 full sets of dentures.  As he explains to his eyebrow-arching hostess:  one set, milchig, one fleischig, the other set the same, but for Passover.  When she inquired about the fifth set, he replies with a shrug, " for when I get that occasional yen for pork!"  For me, trayf is how I see it until I got the ganas for it real bad.  Good thing chocolate is/can be kosher, otherwise, there'd not be any women keeping kosher!

Maybe for dessert one of those Albert Adria pulled sugar raviolis filled with bacon crisps and egg foam, w/a red eye gravy sauce?

Theabroma

YES PLEASE.. Whats a albert Adria pulled sugar ravioli.. you have a link or recipe

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Lard is one thing, but if there's straight up pieces of animal flesh in your dish, it is not dessert. I don't care what they do at the Fat Duck or anywhere else, my feelings on that are quite concrete.

But if you have to make something dessert-esque I would do a spin on the Chinese classic; pulled pork in puff or choux, with smoked pear and buttermilk sorbet (or something else cold and acerbic).

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Maple Bacon Cannolis

Wrap bacon strips around cannoli forms and cook. (Deep or shallow fry? The trick would be to get the bacon to stay on the tube; maybe a little dab of flour paste or maybe just some paperclips?)

Slide bacon off tubes and fill with a maple-ricotta cream.

Bacon could be glazed with a brown sugar mixture; I'm not sure.

Baked stuffed apples; use crumbled bacon, brown sugar, dried bread crumbs, butter and some spices as the filling.

An apple-bacon charlotte.

Glazed Indian pudding studded with cooked bacon bits

Sweet raisin tamale with bacon and served with a cajeta sauce.

A variation on the Indian Bread Pudding, Capirotada.

(toasted bread, sugar, salt, cinnamon, raisins, cheddar cheese) -- add cooked bacon to it. Serve with some heavy cream or a caramel sauce.

Somemores with a bacon layer (graham cracker, marshmellow, dark chocolate, bacon) (??? I'm not sure about this one; maybe the saltiness would be an interesting contrast.)

Peanut Butter Chiffon Pie with a graham cracker-crumbled bacon crust.

(I'm thinking Payday candiy bars here...)

Crepes filled with candied pumpkin cubes, crumbled bacon and walnuts.

Coffee ice craem sundaes with bittersweet choclate sauce and crumbled candied bacon

Dark chocolate mocha truffles rolled in candied bacon crumbles or goat cheese-fig truffles rolled in the same.

Pretty fun to think about, I wonder if any of these would actually be any good?

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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The pig ear napoleon is a cool idea. Or you could cut rectangles of cracklin' and sandwich the bacon ice-cream mentioned upthread between the layers.

Some other ideas:

-bacon baklava: I imagine the crunchy bits of bacon would go nicely with the nut filling...maybe with pistachio instead of walnut? and soak the baklava with maple syrup?

-bacon brioche bread pudding: bread, eggs, bacon--it's practically breakfast food! The smoky, salty bacon would probably be good with a very dark rum caramel.

-pork "Gulab Jamun"--hide a cube of soft, fatty pork that has been cooked with a sweetish sauce in the center of the dough before frying

-bacon "bark"--bacon, crushed salted cashews, dark chocolate

-peanut butter cookies with bacon "chips", sandwiched with the same bacon ice-cream?

-a tart made with puff pastry, walnut pastry cream, figs, and pork?

-Paula Wolfert's "Sweet pumpkin dessert", but serve each cube of pumpkin on a square of bacon glazed in maple syrup or caramel ... recipe here

Edited by Ling (log)
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It looks like a big project, but there's always Pork Cake

Cutting the lemon/the knife/leaves a little cathedral:/alcoves unguessed by the eye/that open acidulous glass/to the light; topazes/riding the droplets,/altars,/aromatic facades. - Ode to a Lemon, Pablo Neruda

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