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Real Texas chili


bobmac
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actually it WAS a chili recipe, and the peppers are dried ancho's torn up and heated in a pan until you can begin to smell them and then ground into chili pepper. pretty basic and cheap ( about 30 large dried peppers were under 2$.). It's a good looking recipe, maybe it could be the next cook off challange.

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actually it WAS a chili recipe, and the peppers are dried ancho's torn up and heated in a pan until you can begin to smell them and then ground into chili pepper. pretty basic and cheap ( about 30 large dried peppers were under 2$.). It's a good looking recipe, maybe it could be the next cook off challange.

Was it this recipe by any chance? It seems a little curious to me that a recipe for chili powder has chili powder as one of the ingredients :unsure:.

THW

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne." John Maynard Keynes

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actually it WAS a chili recipe, and the peppers are dried ancho's torn up and heated in a pan until you can begin to smell them and then ground into chili pepper. pretty basic and cheap ( about 30 large dried peppers were under 2$.). It's a good looking recipe, maybe it could be the next cook off challange.

Was it this recipe by any chance? It seems a little curious to me that a recipe for chili powder has chili powder as one of the ingredients :unsure:.

THW

Yep, same one. and you're right, I checked the cookbook version against the online version and there's been some editing, but I'm not sure which is THE one to follow. in the on lline edition the toasted chilies are ground with still more (I guess commercial type) chili powder and the rest of the spices and all added together as one ingredient with it's own recipe. In the book the toasted chili powder is a separate ingredient and added separately. I doubt it makes a difference with the chili recipe how you do it, but I like homemade spice mixes and it makes sense to double it up and have it on hand. the reviews are stellar...except the one where the guy didn't think chocklate (or something similiar to that spelling) and chili flavors were a good combination. I disagree, and am really anxious to try it. I'm homebound at the moment (working on term/research papers with the boys) but when I break out tomorrow I'll get the stuff to give it a try. I have done the toasted chili bit, and it's got a nice little smokey taste to it, have thrown it in my old blah recipe before to liven it up (made with ground meat). This looks to be a pretty decent adaptation, beans optional!

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I doubt it makes a difference with the chili recipe how you do it, but I like homemade spice mixes and it makes sense to double it up and have it on hand. the reviews are stellar...except the one where the guy didn't think chocklate (or something similiar to that spelling) and chili flavors were a good combination. I disagree, and am really anxious to try it.

I predict you'll love the results. In my recipe (3 lbs beef, cut in 1/2" or so pieces), I add 1/2 oz unsweetened chocolate at the end, just long enough for it to melt into the rest of the pot. It really does make a difference. Subtle, but you can taste it.

THW

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne." John Maynard Keynes

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I find that the addition of chocolate to the chili, either the Mexican bitter or unsweetened cocoa powder, rounds out the flavors. I certainly don't taste chocolate but there is a definite difference, all for the good.

I will swear that I read somewhere (here?) that someone ran into chili served with chocolate chips sprinkled on top! :shock: OK . . . Maybe I dreamed it. But, I don't usually have bad dreams. :biggrin: I think as far out as I will go is the shredded cabbage and radishes, thank you.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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sweet jalapano pepper rings are a good side with chili too.

There is also a latin spice mix on epicurious that's interesting, I use it as a rub sometimes, but I know it has big potential for something else.

My kids cannot have chili without cheese though, so if I only had one thing to serve with it it'd be that.

Edited by highchef (log)
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[i will swear that I read somewhere (here?) that someone ran into chili served with chocolate chips sprinkled on top! :shock: OK . . . Maybe I dreamed it. But, I don't usually have bad dreams. :biggrin: I think as far out as I will go is the shredded cabbage and radishes, thank you.

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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. . . . .

you didn't dream it - it was in  a tailgating thread somewhere on here.

. . . . .

sandy, who made the chili, said the only way to make it was to cut up your beef, brown on one side only in a large pot, sprinkle with a spice mix(torn dried chiles, chopped jalapenos, epizote, more ground chiles) then wet with a beer.  no tomato, no beans in the chili.  just bowl of red.  since then i have also moved to the mole side by adding some good ground chocolate to round out the taste.

Thank you, I think. :biggrin: I was hoping that I dreamed it. I remember it now.

I think your friend's "bowl of red" is close to what the San Antonio Chili Queens served. And I think that originated on the cattle ranches in northern Mexico and south Texas.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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I think your friend's "bowl of red" is close to what the San Antonio Chili Queens served. And I think that originated on the cattle ranches in northern Mexico and south Texas.

That is spot on from what I've read. On the ranch (and on the cattle drives), chili was a good place to use up flavorful but tough cuts, including things like neck meat. They also made beef stock by accident, because they started out with the meat still on the bone and only removed the bones after the meat had cooked off. Sure sounds good to me. Maybe I'll leave out the tomatoes when I make it next :raz:.

THW

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne." John Maynard Keynes

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In keeping with my total disdain and complete lack of regard for a "classic bowl of red" I am happy to post my mother's recipe for White Chili. This is known around our house as "Larry/Steve Chili", as Larry Slash Steve (don't ask, no one was ever sure which was right, I'm not sure his mama knew either, so we just called him both-at the same time--this is one of those confusing North Lousiana things that you folks making those cracks about us in the above posts will never understand :raz: ). Steve was my mother's carpenter on her lake house and pretty much stopped showing up at the end of the job unless he was promised, in advance, that she would provide this for lunch. Chili robbery, for sure. He finally finished, and oddly, left town. Dealing with my mother can be like that sometimes. I did the same thing a long time ago. Lovely woman, just make sure you finish what you start and get it done on time and as budget. Anyway, I digress.

This stuff may or may not be chili by your definition (or even my definition, for that matter) but it's really good. It also freezes really well and is a great thing to double or triple and freeze for those nights when you come home to a bunch of whining, hungry kids that look like starving birds in a nest waiting for their mama to bring them some chewed up worms. This chili is sure to make your children happier that chewed up worms would, so give it a try. You'll thank me. And Mama.

From The Cookbook

Brooksie's White Bean Chili for Larry/Steve

1 lb. large white beans

6 cups good chicken stock

2 cloves garlic

2 medium yellow onions

1 tbs. oil

2 4 oz. cans chopped green chilis

2 tsps. cumin

1 1/2 tsp. ground cloves

1/2 tsp. Cayenne

4 cups cooked diced chicken thighs (make the stock with them, then eat them)

3 cups Grated Monterey Jack Cheese

Combine soaked beans, onions, and broth and cook on low simmer for 3 hours (add more broth to keep beans covered if needed.

In a skillet, saute onions, garlic, green chilis and seasonings

Combine skillet contents with beans-add chicken-cook for another hour

Add tabasco and perk up seasonings

Serve with cheese on top and any of the following condiments (or all of them, if you feel sparky)

Chopped Tomatoes

Sliced Black Olives

Guacamole

Chopped White Onions

Serve with some homemade tortilla chips.

I love that "perk up" line. You have no idea how perky my Dad likes it. His idea of well seasoned is pretty much what most people call crowd deterring pepper spray.

This is good, it's simple, and you should make some.

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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. . . . .

There is also a latin spice mix on epicurious that's interesting, I use it as a rub sometimes, but I know it has big potential for something else.

. . . . .

Is this the spice mix you are referring to?

That mixture is intriguing, to the point that I keep a jar of it around. I suppose one could make an interesting chili based on that profile. It was originally published in relation to a slow roasted pork loin. (That group of recipes has made it into my permanent repertoire, by the way.) Maybe it could make a killer pork chili. Maybe combined with some New Mexico green chiles. Then dollop crema on top. Hmmm.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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In keeping with my total disdain and complete lack of regard for a "classic bowl of red" I am happy to post my mother's recipe for White Chili. This is known around our house as "Larry/Steve Chili", as Larry Slash Steve (don't ask, no one was ever sure which was right, I'm not sure his mama knew either, so we just called him both-at the same time--this is one of those confusing North Lousiana things that you folks making those cracks about us in the above posts will never understand :raz: ). Steve was my mother's carpenter on her lake house and pretty much stopped showing up at the end of the job unless he was promised, in advance, that she would provide this for lunch. Chili robbery, for sure. He finally finished, and oddly, left town. Dealing with my mother can be like that sometimes. I did the same thing a long time ago. Lovely woman, just make sure you finish what you start and get it done on time and as budget. Anyway, I digress.

This stuff may or may not be chili by your definition (or even my definition, for that matter) but it's really good. It also freezes really well and is a great thing to double or triple and freeze for those nights when you come home to a bunch of whining, hungry kids that look like starving birds in a nest waiting for their mama to bring them some chewed up worms. This chili is sure to make your children happier that chewed up worms would, so give it a try. You'll thank me. And Mama.

From The Cookbook

Brooksie's White Bean Chili for Larry/Steve

1 lb. large white beans

6 cups good chicken stock

2 cloves garlic

2 medium yellow onions

1 tbs. oil

2 4 oz. cans chopped green chilis

2 tsps. cumin

1 1/2 tsp. ground cloves

1/2 tsp. Cayenne

4 cups cooked diced chicken thighs (make the stock with them, then eat them)

3 cups Grated Monterey Jack Cheese

Combine soaked beans, onions, and broth and cook on low simmer for 3 hours (add more broth to keep beans covered if needed.

In a skillet, saute onions, garlic, green chilis and seasonings

Combine skillet contents with beans-add chicken-cook for another hour

Add tabasco and perk up seasonings

Serve with cheese on top and any of the following condiments (or all of them, if you feel sparky)

Chopped Tomatoes

Sliced Black Olives

Guacamole

Chopped White Onions

Serve with some homemade tortilla chips.

I<a onMouseOver="window.status='' ; return true;"  onMouseOut="window.status='';" oncontextmenu="window.status=''; return true;" onclick="location.href='http://www.enhancemysearch.com/admin/results.php?q=Love&id=31';return false;" href="" TITLE="More Info..."> love </a>that "perk up" line. You have no idea how perky my Dad likes it. His idea of well seasoned is pretty much what most people call crowd deterring pepper spray.

This is good, it's simple, and you should make some.

you mean like Billy Bob and Billie sue? True to life brother and sister, the middle names necessary to tell them apart? Just kidding, I love north Louisiana folks, I married one, kinda.

The chili recipe sounds great..I'll try it soon. maybe this morning as I can't sleep.

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. . . . .

There is also a latin spice mix on epicurious that's interesting, I use it as a rub sometimes, but I know it has big potential for something else.

. . . . .

Is this the spice mix you are referring to?

That mixture is intriguing, to the point that I keep a jar of it around. I suppose one could make an interesting chili based on that profile. It was originally published in relation to a slow roasted pork loin. (That group of recipes has made it into my permanent repertoire, by the way.) Maybe it could make a killer pork chili. Maybe combined with some New Mexico green chiles. Then dollop crema on top. Hmmm.

Yes, that's the one. I wonder if you toasted the ancho's with it if it might make a different chili powder mix. It goes well with the dishes it was designed for too, I've made them and they are really nice. Yea, pork chili....

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In keeping with my total disdain and complete lack of regard for a "classic bowl of red" I am happy to post my mother's recipe for White Chili.

Lessee now, "white chili". Hmmmm. That would be sort of like gumbo make with English peas, macaroni and Velveeta, right :raz:? Geez, have you people no shame :wacko::shock::raz:?

Chili is made with beef (usually, although venison also makes damn good chili if you add some pork fat). What you describe may taste very good, but it ain't chili! :biggrin:.

THW

Edited because I initially made a broader statement than I was willing to defend once I reflected on it for a little while :raz:.

Edited by hwilson41 (log)

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne." John Maynard Keynes

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Actually, in Gumbo Z'herbes, english peas might be a nice addition. THey are green, and delicious-pretty much meeting the requirements for that fine dish. Thanks for the suggestion. :raz:

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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All this posting about unique (i.e. strange or just plain weird) chili recipes and ingredients caused me to Google "unique chili recipe". 30 hits. :shock:

Here's a link to a site devoted to unique chili recipes.

Personally, the idea of "vegetarian chili" is even more sacriligeous than "white chili". Call it what it really is, lentil soup.

At least white chili has some form of animal in it. Chili is food for carnivores. It should never be tainted by vegetables, except for maybe tomatoes to remind us of blood. :raz:

THW, you wrote

Edited because I initially made a broader statement that I was willing to defend once I reflected on it for a little while . :raz:

I am confused. :wacko:

"As far as I'm concerned, bacon comes from a magical, happy place" Frank, John Doe

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THW, you wrote 
Edited because I initially made a broader statement that I was willing to defend once I reflected on it for a little while . :raz:

I am confused. :wacko:

Highchef was spot on. A typo on my part, which I have since edited. Sorry. I guess it was too early in the morning :blink:.

THW

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne." John Maynard Keynes

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I am trying to refine that Tyler Florence's recipe, but found another anomoly. He does not brown the meat first, but seasons and brings it to a boil, then adds rest of ingredients and lets it go till tender. I've never made a chili without browning the meat first. It's either habit or instinct. so I think I'll have to change that unless someone can tell me why I shouldn't. thanks.

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I have always browned my meat. That being said, I have a friend that makes chili without browning the meat. It has won a couple of times in chili cook-offs. Go figure. I'm not ready to go there, though.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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I suppose, that if it was super lean meat, you might be able to skip the browning part-but why would you? That's all part of the taste of the dish. I'm with Fifi, I'm just not that ready or that lazy.

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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Oooo yeah . . . bacon drippings. That is all good and that is what I use if I don't have my own fresh made lard. Actually, beef with enough fat in it is my favorite. I have been in a Cajun gumbo etouffee mode this week but I might have to go in a chili direction next week. There were some really pretty radishes at my HEB yesterday. Really, you have to try radishes on chili. It is just sublime, texture and taste wise. Now I am wondering where the radish thing came from in Mexican cuisine.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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There were some really pretty radishes at my HEB yesterday. Really, you have to try radishes on chili. It is just sublime, texture and taste wise. Now I am wondering where the radish thing came from in Mexican cuisine.

Fifi, to be honest I'm having a little trouble getting my mind around the "radishes in chili" concept, but I'll give it a try next time I make a pot just for you :raz:. Maybe we should try some okra too :biggrin::biggrin::biggrin:?

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne." John Maynard Keynes

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