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raisab

Cheese Shops in Paris

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Can someone help me find a thread that talked about cheese shops in Paris? I don't think I am going crazy but I am sure I even participated in it!

I just need some cheese shops in different arrondissements, I remember there were a few that vacuum packed the cheese for you.

Thanks for all your help.

(Ran searches but can't locate!)


Paris is a mood...a longing you didn't know you had, until it was answered.

-An American in Paris

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I'm experiencing the same lost-post amnesia. Maybe I only thought I wrote about a cheese shop I went to in Paris.

Regardless, we went to a cheese shop in the 17th that will vac seal

cheeses for travel. L'ermitage Demours, 88 r. Pierre Demours.

Hal

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Patricia Wells, numerous eGullet-types and I all think highly of Marie-Anne Cantin in the 7th, just around the corner from the Rue Cler Market and the hotel we always stay at in Paris (OK, stayed at twice. But I like to think of myself as needing a pied-a-terre in Paris). Even if you never find the thread, you can feel pretty confident about Cantin, who does vacuum pack upon request.

PS -- the last time I tried to smuggle foodstuffs past Customs, they told me that cheese was fine -- even letting me bring something stinky that was wrapped only in battered aluminum foil into the country. Just watching a uniformed non-cheese person react when the scent escaped the foil and assaulted her nostrils was almost worth the potential fine. She did, however, make a bit of a non-cheese stink about the cured meat I'd forgotton to ditch on the plane.


I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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I have never bothered to vac-pac cheese that I was bringing home, and we arrive home with cheese more often than not. Usually I either use the remaining store wrap or nest several like-kinds of cheese in a small tupperware-type container (read: recycled plastic traiteur box). I always declare it at customs, and they really don't enforce the age requirement. (As I understand it, you are allowed to bring in cheese that is partially aged; e.g., brie is fine while fromage blanc is not.)

Off topic but perhaps relevant: On every re-entry in 2004 we have been specifically asked if we had any meat products. No. Canned? No. Pates? No. Etc. They are obviously enforcing the ban on foie gras and its derivatives, at least in San Francisco.


eGullet member #80.

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Coming into the West Coast from Japan, I have always found the Customs inspectors a lot tougher than those in NYC. In fact, I chatted it up with one in Portland who told me he was going to Paris with his girlfriend. I told him he should go through Customs at JFK. In conversation with another Customs employee, I found out that the food dog handlers aren't allowed to tell you the name of their dog.

I can vouch for Cantin. It's very good. She doesn't have a really large selection, thank God.

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I bring cheese in every week. cru or not. I just wanted different options as to where to buy as I don't want to run all over town to get to my cheese shops. I don't remember names just where they are.

I bring in Foie Gras all the time into New York, any chicken or duck product is fine as long as it is cooked. Occosionally I have brought in Fresh Foie Gras and kust declare it as Foie Gras as it looks the same as cooked.

Thank you for your help and if anyone finds the thread lemme know!


Paris is a mood...a longing you didn't know you had, until it was answered.

-An American in Paris

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I bring cheese in every week. cru or not. I just wanted different options as to where to buy as I don't want to run all over town to get to my cheese shops. I don't remember names just where they are.

#9 Rue du Poteau in the 18th shrink wraps; I'm sure Cantin in the 7th, Alleosse in the 17th and both Bon Marche and Galeries L. must d/t # of foreigners I see ordering cheese. But there must be a thread somewhere. Lacking that; check the Produits (last) section in each arrondissement in Pudlo. Sorry.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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Androuët on rue de Verneuil in the 7th (just off rue du Bac) has a nice selection and will vacuum pack on request.

By the way, wouldn't you think this website would have an emoticon shown licking its little lips?

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Barthelemy on rue de Grenelles in the 7th vacuum packs. I've purchased from both Barthelemy and Marie Anne Cantin and find Barthelemy superior. They do a much better job of selecting cheese that will withstand the trip. Also, Alain Dubois in the 17th does a fabulous job with cheese for travel.

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Barthelemy has particularly good selection on Chevres.

I can't believe no one has brought up the fantastic Fromagerie Quartrehomme, right by La Grande Epicerie.


Edited by pim (log)

chez pim

not an arbiter of taste

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My favorite Cheese Shop (Fromagerie) in Paris is Alloesse, which is located in the 17th arrondissement on 13 rue Poncelet.

Alloesse has very comprehensive array of cheeses, some of which are aged/ripened in the caves beneath the shop. They are also the supplier of cheeses to the world-renowned, three-star restaurant Taillevent.

Business Hours:

Tuesday-Saturday: 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. & 4:00-7:00 p.m.

Sunday: 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.

(Closed Sunday afternoon & all day Monday)

Metro: Ternes

Other Fromageries in other arrondissements (chiefly the 7th) are:

Androuet Maitre Fromagerie

83 rue Saint-Dominique

7th arrondissement

Barthelemy (Fromagerie)

51 rue de Grenelle

7th arrondissement

Barthelemy is a source for some of the best Vacherin in Paris and is also known for its Epoisses, Camembert, and Roquefort.

Open: Tues.-Sat. 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. & 4:00-7:00 p.m. (Closed Sun. & Mon.)

Metro: Rue du Bac

Marie-Anne Cantin (Fromagerie)

12 rue du Champ de Mars

7th arrondissement

One of Paris' most famous fromageries, Marie-Anne Cantin is family-run shop with a well-rounded and consistent selection of about 120 different cheeses, 40-50 of which are chevres. The house specialty is Saint-Antoine, a triple-cream made from cow's milk in the Ile-de-France.

Open: Tues.-Sun.: 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.; Tues.-Sat.: 4:00-7:00 p.m.

Metro: Ecole Militaire Located near rue Cler, a market street.

Quatre Homme (Fromagerie)

62 rue des Sevres

7th arrondissement

118 rue Mouffetard

5th arrondissement

A source for cheeses popular with restauranteurs, Quatre Homme usually has impressive, hard-to-find Beauford (from Haut-Savoie) and a creamy Saint-Marcellin.

Open: Tues.-Sun.: 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.; Tues.-Sat.: 4:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.


Edited by Luna Calvados (log)

"Some ladies smoke too much and some ladies drink too much and some ladies pray too much, but all ladies think that they weigh too much."

From a poem by Ogden Nash - Curl Up and Diet

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I stumbled upon this cheese shop during one of my walks this weekend in Paris. Why have I not read anything on it before?

La Fromagerie Boursault 71, Avenue de General LeClerc, 75014 Paris

They are affineurs and the quality and prices of their cheeses are excellent! I took a tour of their caves while I was there. The gentleman (and the rest of the workers) running the shop were extremely kind and helpful.

I also ran into Yves Camdeborde purchasing his cheese for the day while I was there. Needless to say I am impressed by this shop, and am surprised I haven't seen it mentioned on this board!


Edited by raisab (log)

Paris is a mood...a longing you didn't know you had, until it was answered.

-An American in Paris

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If you're ever wandering the Latin Quarter, the Cremerie des Carmes on the Place Maubert does vacuum sealing/packing, as well:

Crémerie des Carmes

Address: 47 ter, boulevard St-Germain, 75005 Paris.

Phone: 01-43-54-50-93

Hours: 6:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 - 7:30 p.m.; closed Sunday afternoons & Mondays.

Proprietor: David Ferreira.

Maubert-Mutualité (line 10).

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For the interest of those keeping score of the "best of," Jean-Claude Ribaut, in Wednesday/Thursday’s Le Monde writes of the installation of the fine affinateur of cheeses, Henry Voy at La Ferme Saint-Hubert in the Ternes market in the 17th, open Tuesday to Saturday 9-1 and 4 to 7:30 PM as well as Sunday mornings 9-1:30. He goes on to list the best cheese sellers in the city, including: the three in the 7th - Barthélémy, Marie-Anne Cantin + Quatrehomme, Trotté in the 4th, Mollard in the 9th, Alléosse + Dubois et fils in the 17th, six cheese-shops that Androuet runs (www.androuet.com) and Les Fromages de Pierre for tastings in the 15th.

Remember too to check our Compendium of exiting threads on Cheese.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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John-

The article in Le Monde doesn't indicate, but have you--or anybody else out there--heard any rumors about whether Henri Voy is going to open a restaurant with his new cheese shop?

His old Ferme St. Hubert restaurant attached to his shop in the rue Vignon was a blessing to us cheeseheads. I've heard that he had troubles after expanding too fast with his second restaurant but don't know if there's any truth to that.

At any rate thank you for the article link. I'd been wondering what happened to him.

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I too wondered what happened to Henri Voy when I found his rue Vignon shop turned into a truffle restaurant. Thanks for the update.

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Glad to find there's been some discussion of Parisian cheese shops here -- we're making a trip there in mid-April. The suggestions here sound good, particularly Alloesse and La Fromagerie Boursault -- any other cheese shop recommendations?


Cooking and writing and writing about cooking at the SIMMER blog

Pop culture commentary at Intrepid Media

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While the shops mentioned above are all excellent, we greatly enjoyed Ferme St. Hubert's Rochechouart, no. 36, location: magnificent old marble fixtures, fine assortment of cheeses and dairy and wonderful attention and instruction from the maitre.

I will add that there is great food presence on this section of Rochechouart: the deliriously fanciful bakery/tea seller, Aurore-Capucine at no. 3; amazing Epicerie Gourmandes aux Pipalottes at no.49, which combines deli take-out choices, floor to ceiling shelves of fine food products and a few tables where you can choose from a short menu a light lunch or shopping respite.

Edited to add this website that features restaurants, shops and events in this (9e) quartier.


Edited by Margaret Pilgrim (log)

eGullet member #80.

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Can anyone recommend a good cheese in Paris shop, even if Anthony's cheeses are not sold there? Apologies for the thread drift.

thanks in advance.


Edited by hmspector (log)

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It sounds as though there is a need for more research with all these fine shops to choose from. I look forward to trying a few. Thanks to John for directing me to this thread and thanks to the previous posters.

I am looking into an overnight trip to visit Anthony and the surrounding area. A place I have not been. I had heard that because the Suisse were not part of EU one had to "clear" the border and it could take some time. It sounds as though that is not the case.

I will arrive armed with a hearty sense of adventure, a clean palate and an appetite.


David West

A.K.A. The Mushroom Man

Founder of http://finepalatefoods.com/

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You do need your passport and clearing at the Swiss border, but Antony is in France. It means you have to count 10 more minutes on your route, unless you get caught with cocaine or stuff.

Luna Calvados' post upthread is still perfectly valid. Alleosse, Cantin and Dubois are probably the best, Androuet has a nice network and Quatrehomme has good value. Also there are local good shops without the fame such as the one in the rue des Martyrs close to Rose Bakery.

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