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Brad Ballinger

"Boiling Potatoes"

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You really don't see potatoes labeled "boiling potatoes" in the supermarkets. When you come across a recipe that calls for them, what do you use. Yukon Golds?

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It depends on what I'm using them for. I boil many different kinds. I really do like Yukon golds, as they have a rich sweetnes, my guess is a higher component of converted starches than others, which I feel really lends itself to purees and the like. I use russets for the length and size in some things, i.e., potato wraps or crusts around meat or fish.

Paul

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Personally quite fond of the new red little spring potatoes for boiling .. but not overcooking!

They are such an excellent accompaniment to virtually all entrees and are also marvelous when served as an appetizer with creme fraiche and a dollop or caviar.

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Personally quite fond of the new red little spring potatoes for boiling .. but not overcooking!

They are such an excellent accompaniment to virtually all entrees and are also marvelous when served as an appetizer with creme fraiche and a dollop or caviar.

Same here.

I've found the waxier ones hold up the best in boiled dishes. Starchy ones that are good for baking break down too much when boiled. (You pretty much have to mash them after that! Not that that's a bad dish! :biggrin: )

SML

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Also it is a timing issue as to when you do add your potatoes. Idaho and Russets will disolve rather quickly so when using them in soups or stews I add them last. New potatoes, Yukons, and redskins will hold up much better but need to be added just a bit earlier in the dish than the russets. I like Russets in my soups and reds or Yukons in my stews but you can incorperate either as long as you pay attention to the timing. BTW, the potato thread rocks............. Doug..........

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Thanks for the thought of the eCGI link. I have to keep remembering that part of the site (I really should know better). It had the information I needed. My post was to ask about what kind of potato for a boiling potato, not how do you like to cook boiled potatoes. The main thing I can tell that distinguishes a boiling potato is thin skin and higher starch.

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