Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Indian Food


Episure
 Share

Recommended Posts

Indian cuisine's most popular herb Coriander/ Kothmir/Dhania/Cilantro can more than make a chatni of salmonella, a pathogen that can cause food poisoning.

The compound is dodecenal, found in the leaves and seeds. Lab researchers found that dodecenal was twice as powerful in killing salmonella as the commonly used antibiotic gentamicin.

The research also seems to back up previous studies showing that some spices can help prevent food spoilage.

The study's lead author, Isao Kubo, said the same compound also is found in olive oil, but in smaller amounts.

Cilantro is also a common ingredient in the popular Mexican salsa, itself the focus of various studies testing its supposed antibacterial properties, but this latest study is said to be the first to have isolated any of the antibacterial compounds from it.

The findings could lead to expanded use of dodecenal as a tasteless food additive to prevent foodborne illness, perhaps as a protective coating for meats in processing plants, or even as a general purpose disinfectant to be used in cleaning and hand washing, the researchers said.

The study appears in the 26 May issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, a peer-reviewed publication of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society.

Edited by Episure (log)

I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

EU HOOI KHAW dines sumptuously under the gaze of the long gone kings of India, at the Maharaj in Petaling Jaya. The reporters name EU HOOI KHAW sounds like Bhojpuri/UP/Bhaiya for "this is good food". Didnt get it , think Amitabh Bachhan. :biggrin: Edited by Episure (log)

I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Bring on the Butter/Makhani chicken :unsure:

New report disputes commonly used statistics, cites evidence of obesity hysteria driven by pharmaceutical industry

Washington, DC – As ABC News and Time magazine convene a major gathering this week to discuss the nation’s expanding waistline, rhetoric about the “obesity epidemic” has itself reached epidemic proportions. In a new report entitled “An Epidemic of Obesity Myths,” the Center for Consumer Freedom presents evidence that disputes many commonly cited statistics and presumptions driving today’s obesity hysteria. The report also exposes how the pharmaceutical industry is putting enormous resources behind research that grossly exaggerates the costs of being overweight.

Citing a wide array of health, exercise and nutrition experts from Case Western Reserve University, George Washington University, the University of Virginia, and the former editor-in-chief of The New England Journal of Medicine, the report undermines oft-quoted myths including:

Obesity kills 400,000 Americans a year

Obesity costs the U.S. economy $117 billion per year

64 percent of Americans are overweight or obese

Overeating is the primary cause of obesity

Overweight individuals cannot be healthy

Soda consumption causes childhood obesity

The hype behind these obesity myths has become the driving force for trial lawyers who see dollar signs where the rest of us see dinner and activists who advocate radical “solutions” like zoning restrictions on restaurants and extra taxes and warning labels on certain foods.

ObesityPack.jpg

Along with today’s release of “An Epidemic of Obesity Myths,” the Center for Consumer Freedom distributed an obesity prevention kit, which provides those concerned about weight gain with plenty of common sense “warning labels” including a mirror, doggy bag, pedometer, a calorie expenditure chart and a glossary of terms. All items in the kit emphasize personal responsibility—not government intervention.

It's worth taking a look at the whole enchilada

Edited by Episure (log)

I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Elsewhere on this site mongo_jones had softly threatened to start a blog:

Posted: Jun 11 2004, 04:36 PM

i retract all my bleary-eyed, first cup of tea in the morning attempts at cracking wise.

(edit to add: especially since if i'm not careful i might piss someone off and get fingered to do a blog myself)

carry on.

Well he's done it now, I guess we will have to make a detour from the India forums everyday. :blink:

foodblog: mongo_jones, how to lose friends and annoy people

I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Elsewhere on this site mongo_jones had softly threatened to start a blog:

I saw this too. I'm surprised nobody has cracked a joke about how he, attempting to sound like a reluctant blog virgin, actually was advertising his interest being the next to be tagged.

Looks like it's off to a good start though.

I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.

--NeroW

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Elsewhere on this site mongo_jones had softly threatened to start a blog:

I saw this too. I'm surprised nobody has cracked a joke about how he, attempting to sound like a reluctant blog virgin, actually was advertising his interest being the next to be tagged.

Looks like it's off to a good start though.

When I read that statement, I knew he was begging.

Well there you are, mongo_jones: part enfant terrible, part angel, part boogie man to his nephews, part swami and full time ambassador of Indian cuisine.

His "what does indian food mean to you?" question and it's responses are more relevant than some recently published market surveys.

Edited by Episure (log)

I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link is now active- click herebest of indian

The world grieves for mongo_jones operation

mongo_jones grieves for himself Fingered finally

Edited by Episure (log)

I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By liuzhou
      This almost had me in tears of nostalgia. My London home is a few minutes walk from here and I love the place. So glad to hear it seems to be being protected from developers, as I had heard it was under threat.   Wonderful food, too. Mostly vegetarian, which I'm decidedly not, but will happily eat from time to time.   London's most authentic Indian food?    
       
    • By Sheel
      Prawn Balchao is a very famous Goan pickle that has a sweet, spicy and tangy flavor to it. 
      For the balchao paste you will need:
      > 8-10 kashmiri red chillies
      > 4-5 Byadagi red chillies
      > 1/2 tsp cumin seeds
      > 1/2 tsk turmeric powder 
      > 1 tsp peppercorn
      > 6 garlic cloves
      > 1/2 tsp cloves
      > 1 inch cinnamon stick
      > Vinegar 
      First you will need to marinate about 250 grams of prawns in some turmeric powder and salt. After 15 minutes deep fry them in oil till them become golden n crisp. Set them aside and add tsp vinegar to them and let it sit for 1 hour. Now, make a paste of all the ingredients mentioned under the balchao paste and make sure not to add any water. In the same pan used for fryin the prawns, add in some chopped garlic and ginger. Lightly fry them and immediately add one whole chopped onion. Next, add the balchao paste amd let it cook for 2-3 minutes. Add in the prawns and cook until the gravy thickens. Finally add 1 tsp sugar and salt according to your taste. Allow it to cool. This can be stored in a glass jar. Let this mature for 1-3 weeks before its use. Make sure never to use water at any stage. This can be enjoyed with a simple lentil curry and rice.
    • By Deeps
      This is one of my daughter favorite dishes, being mild and less spicy she loves this rice dish.  Its super easy to make and goes well with most Indian curries.
      Do try this out and I am sure you will be happy with the results.
       

       
      Prep Time : 5 mins
      Cook Time: 5 mins
      Serves: 2
       
      Ingredients:
      1 cup rice(basmati), cooked
      1/2 cup coconut, shredded or grated
      1 green chili, slit
      1 dried red chili
      1 1/2 tablespoon oil/ghee(clarified butter)
      1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds
      1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds
      1/2 tablespoon chana dal(split chickpeas)
      1/2 tablespoon urad dal(split black gram)
      1 teaspoon ginger, finely chopped
      A pinch of hing (asafoetida)
      Few curry leaves
      Salt to taste
       
      Directions
      1) Heat oil/ghee(clarified butter) in a pan in medium flame. I used coconut oil here because it tastes best for this dish.
      2) Add mustard seeds, cumin seeds, chana dal(split chickpeas), urad dal(split black gram), green chili, dried red chili, ginger and curry leaves. Fry this for 30 seconds in medium flame. The trick is to ensure that these are fried but not burned.
      3) Add a pinch of hing(asafoetida) and mix well.
      4) Now add the cooked rice and coconut. Stir well for about 15 to 20 seconds and switch off the flame.
      5) Finally add salt into this and mix well. You could add peanuts or cashew nuts if you prefer. Goes well with most curries.
    • By loki
      Sour Tomatillo Achar

      Made this one up from a recipe for lemons. It really works for tomatilloes. A unique spice mix, and really sour for a 'different' type of pickle, or achar. It is based on a Marwari recipe - from the arid north-western part of India. Tomatilloes are not used in India (or at least not much) but are quite productive plants in my garden while lemons or other sour fruits are not possible to grow here. No vinegar or lemon juice is used, because tomatilloes are very acidic and don't need any extra.

      Ingredients
      3 lbs tomatilloes husks removed and quartered
      1/4 cup salt
      1 Tbs black mustard seeds
      2 star anise buds
      10 dried chilies (I used very hot yellow peppers)
      1 tsp fenugreek seeds
      2 inch ginger (ground to a paste)
      2 TBL dark brown sugar
      1/2 cup sugar

      1. In a large bowl, put the tomatilloes and sprinkle salt over them. Cover it and leave for a day, mixing occasionally.

      2. Next day drain the tomatilloes.

      3. Dry roast the star anise (put in first as these take longer, the black mustard, and the chilie pods (add last and barely brown in places). Cool.

      4. Grind the roasted spices with the fenugreek and put aside.

      5. Add tomatilloes, ginger, sugars, and everything else to a large pan and heat to boiling.

      6. Cook till fully hot and boiling.

      7. Fill half-pint jars and seal.
    • By loki
      Sweet Eggplant Pickle

      This is an Indian pickle, some would call a chutney, that I made up from several sources and my own tastes. It is based it on my favorite sweet brinjal (eggplant here in the US) pickle available commercially. It has onion and garlic, which are often omitted in some recipes due to dietary restrictions of some religious orders. It also has dates which I added on my own based on another pickle I love. I also used olive oil as mustard oil is not available and I like it's taste in these pickles. Use other oils if you like. This has more spices than the commercial type - and I think it's superior. I avoided black mustard seed, fenugreek, and cumin because almost all other pickles use these and they start to taste the same. One recipe from Andhra Pradesh used neither and I followed it a little. It's wonderful with all sorts of Indian foods - and also used for many other dishes, especially appetizers.
      SPICE MIX (Masala)
      4 Tbs coriander seeds
      3 hot chilies (I used a very hot Habanero type, so use more if you use others)
      18 cardamom pods
      2 inches cinnamon
      24 cloves
      1 1/2 Tbs peppercorns
      MAIN INGREDIENTS
      1 cups olive oil
      4 inches fresh ginger, minced fine, about 1/2 cup
      6 cloves garlic, minced
      1 large onion finely chopped
      3 lb eggplant, diced, 1/4 inch cubes
      1/2 lb chopped dates
      1 1/2 tsp turmeric powder
      2 cups rice vinegar (4.3 percent acidity or more)
      2 cups brown sugar
      2 Tbs salt
      2 tsp citric acid
      Spice Mix (Masala)

      1. Dry roast half the coriander seeds in a pan till they begin to brown slightly and become fragrant - do not burn. Cool.

      2. Put roasted and raw coriander seeds and all the other spices in a spice mill and grind till quite fine, or use a mortar and pestle. Put aside.

      Main Pickle

      1. Heat half the oil and fry ginger till slightly browned, slowly.

      2. Add garlic, onion, and half the salt and fry slowly till these begin to brown a bit too.

      3. Add eggplant, turmeric, and spice mix (Masala) and combine well. Fry for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.

      4. Add rest of ingredients, including rest of the salt and olive oil and heat slowly to a boil.

      5. Boil for about 5 minutes. Add a little water if too thick - it should be nearly covered with liquid, but not quite - it will thin upon cooking so wait to add the water till heated through.

      6. Bottle in sterilized jars and seal according to your local pickling instructions. This recipe will be sufficiently acidic.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...