Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Scrambling/Scrambled Eggs


Fat Guy
 Share

Recommended Posts

When I make these, I use a ton of butter in the pan (not clarified). I whisk 1 Tbsp water into every two eggs, and cook them gently, folding over for large curds, and take the shebang off of the heat when they are still runny, because they cook in their own heat for a minute or so. Flavorings such as chives can be added in anywhere in the process.

According to the chef who did the scrambled eggs for last year's smoked wild salmon tasting at Fortnum and Mason's, that's about the way he made them for thirty people, in a huge pan. It took him twenty minutes over a low flame. He looked as though he spent a lot of time sampling them, and no wonder -- they were ambrosial.

This year there was a different chef. The scrambled eggs were dry little curds, no doubt cooked to an officially "safe" temperature. We left the eggs and had twice as much salmon.

John Whiting, London

Whitings Writings

Top Google/MSN hit for Paris Bistros

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I make these, I use a ton of butter in the pan (not clarified). I whisk 1 Tbsp water into every two eggs, and cook them gently, folding over for large curds, and take the shebang off of the heat when they are still runny, because they cook in their own heat for a minute or so. Flavorings such as chives can be added in anywhere in the process.

According to the chef who did the scrambled eggs for last year's smoked wild salmon tasting at Fortnum and Mason's, that's about the way he made them for thirty people, in a huge pan. It took him twenty minutes over a low flame. He looked as though he spent a lot of time sampling them, and no wonder -- they were ambrosial.

This year there was a different chef. The scrambled eggs were dry little curds, no doubt cooked to an officially "safe" temperature. We left the eggs and had twice as much salmon.

Okay - so here's the thing to do.

When you are whipping up your eggs to scramble, add no additional liquid at that time.

Put your butter, evoo, etc., whatever you prefer, in the pan; add your beaten eggs, seasonings and additions you like, and scramble as usual.

Get a carton of heavy cream (best) or half n' half (or for diet considerations, evap milk or skimmed evap milk) and set it in front of you, open and at the ready.

Now - at the penultimate moment, just as the eggs are nearing the finish line, while they are still wet, stir in a little cream...I'd say about 1/4 cup for, say, four or five eggs.

Whisk rapidly, finishing the eggs.

The cream added at the next-to-last minute gathers up the remaining uncooked eggs, and you simmer for just a few seconds longer.

Your eggs are creamy, moist but not shiny-wet. They are throughly cooked to a "safe temperature" but they are not dry. They are soft and creamy and "ambrosial."

Everyone, even the so-called "I can't eat wet, slimy, 'un-cooked' scrambled eggs" crowd will love this.

They are simply the best. There is absolutely no comparison.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I scrambled eggs in bacon fat this weekend. And added a little spring onion and aged cheddar.

Yum.

Miss J that sounds absolutely tops. Now I'm hungry again.

Last weekend when I made my husband's egg sandwich I fried the egg in bacon fat for a change, unbeknownst to him. Cooked the bacon on a sheet pan in the oven, my new favorite way, despite what everyone says on the "bacon" thread, and simply tipped some of the fat into the skillet I was using. It looked simply beautiful -- all crispy around the edges.

He said it was delicious, but then again, he always says that about my cooking. :biggrin:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Last weekend when I made my husband's egg sandwich I fried the egg in bacon fat for a change, unbeknownst to him.  Cooked the bacon on a sheet pan in the oven, my new favorite way, despite what everyone says on the "bacon" thread, and simply tipped some of the fat into the skillet I was using

For thirty years, whenever I had to make a lot of bacon, either because cooking for a large crowd at breakfast, or because I had a recipe that called for a lot of bacon bits in it, I have made it in a sheet pan in the oven. It is much easier... frees up your stovetop to cook your other items, bacon for crowd arrives hot and all at the same time, little muss little fuss.

And it tastes just fine!

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jaymes, that works. Sometimes I put a smaller baking sheet on top of the bacon strips at the beginning so that they come out straight: slightly curled but not twisted.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jaymes, that works. Sometimes I put a smaller baking sheet on top of the bacon strips at the beginning so that they come out straight: slightly curled but not twisted.

GREAT idea! One of those, "Why-didn't-I-think-of-that?" things.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

I don't beat them or whisk them at all!

Add oil to pan. Break the eggs directly into the pan. Break up the yolks minimally while cooking, but don't beat them. Mix the eggs around to swirl around the yolk, and flip over a few times in teh process, but make sure the yolks remain largely separated from the white. Remove from heat when the eggs are still moist and soggy. They should harden up on your plate.

Best eggs ever, and they look marbled yellow and white. Very impressive looking.

Edited by stephenc (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Generous salt, lots of small cubes of unsalted cold butter, and a splash of half and half. What goes in them beyond that depends on the meal and the season. Chiffonade of basil, a drizzle of truffle oil, diced pancetta, finely minced shallots, sauteed leeks, you name it.

EDIT: I almost forgot . . . pepper of course, particularly on fried eggs. Oh wait, this is a scrambled thread!

Edited by SiseFromm (log)

R. Jason Coulston

jason@popcling.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How we like our eggs scrambled is mostly a reflection of personal preference, not a matter of the "right" way or the "wrong" way to make them.

I don't beat them or whisk them at all!

Add oil to pan.  Break the eggs directly into the pan.  Break up the yolks minimally while cooking, but don't beat them.  Mix the eggs around to swirl around the yolk, and flip over a few times in teh process, but make sure the yolks remain largely separated from the white.  Remove from heat when the eggs are still moist and soggy.  They should harden up on your plate.

Best eggs ever, and they look marbled yellow and white.  Very impressive looking.

I like fried eggs and scrambled eggs (scrambled my way), but this is something I couldn't even eat.

There are so many different ways to scramble an egg.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

my technique, which is indisputably the best ever, is close to Jaymes'. the only difference is that i use a couple of tablespoons of cold butter rather than the cream. the trick is catching it just as the eggs are starting to set. the butter lowers the temperature enough that you get that silky quality you get with long-cooked scrambled eggs, but you can do it in less than 10 minutes. as for beating eggs, you should do it as little as possible, just enough to incorporate the yolks and whites.

of course, all of that said, i think there are two schools of egg scrambling: the soft, moist, kind (mine), that is closer to a broken hollandaise, and then the fluffy, dryer kind that you find at most restaurants. not to place any value judgements, of course ....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like to to strain the eggs before adding them to the pan. I agree about the cold butter stalling the cooking process.

what ever happened to a pan in a pan of simmering water? It makes a great scramble.

“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like to to strain the eggs before adding them to the pan. I agree about the cold butter stalling the cooking process.

what ever happened to a pan in a pan of simmering water? It makes a great scramble.

I scramble my eggs in a nonstick pan set on top of a pot of simmering water.

It's the best thing to do if you're likely to forget, because they can't overcook.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First, I'd like to say that I've read through the entire thread and miss some of the posters that have gone off the forum. :sad:

Second, I'd like to add my scrambled method.

I have one of those old Tupperware shaker containers that are supposed to be used for mixing flour type mixes.

Three eggs per person get broken into the container, splashes of whole milk or half and half. Add salted butter to nonstick pan. Shake container *with gusto* .

Add to heated pan and swish with spatula until firm.

Serve with copious amounts of bacon. :smile: Enjoy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First, I'd like to say that I've read through the entire thread and miss some of the posters that have gone off the forum. :sad:

Second, I'd like to add my scrambled method.

I have one of those old Tupperware shaker containers that are supposed to be used for mixing flour type mixes.

Three eggs per person get broken into the container, splashes of whole milk or half and half. Add salted butter to nonstick pan. Shake container *with gusto* .

Add to heated pan and swish with spatula until firm.

Serve with copious amounts of bacon. :smile: Enjoy.

Everything's better with bacon. mmmm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

fresh eggs beaten with a bit of cream or milk and some salt, butter in the small cast-iron, when it sizzles, IN go the eggs and OFF goes the pan--I do most of the cooking off the heat, for very, very slow-cooked eggs, just putting it back onto the flame to reheat the iron again. the advantage is that it can cook slowly enough to finish at the same time as my slow-poke boyfriend gets out of the shower. :raz:

if I'm running short on eggs, I'll toast fine breadcrumbs in the butter first--different, but very, very, very good.

of course, I'm only really developing the scrambled eggs expertise because I've become despondant over my omelet disasters. have tried Julia Child's shake-shake-shake DONE method for a year now, to no avail.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To really evaluate a technique, you need to test it against the alternative, and at the same time.

The most effective way is to test three ways at the same time. So to see what the proper amount of liquid is, you could add 50% more than you usually do to one batch, fix in the normal way, and make a batch with 50% less than usual.

Taste them all and see how it worked out. Compare. Do they taste as you expected?

I find that most people claim to have extremely strong egg preferences, but have never actually compared alternatives. So they're only guessing when they say that X does this or that.

If you read that eggs should be made with water, and you like milk or cream, compare water vs milk vs heavy cream in the volume that you determined was correct in the previous test.

How do you like them cooked? How much butter? All of these things can be compared objectively.

When I did these tests myself, I found that I had not been making eggs the way the tests showed I preferred them, and so I changed.

I like them much better this way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My preference is a slow cooked method that I inherited (stole) from a French matron that was my next door neighbor in an apartment in Manhattan about 30 years ago. Takes 10+ minutes but it's a simple Zen kind of thing. Perfect time to have a Bloody Mary on the side.

Use a heavy medium saucepan, preferably non-stick. Grab a stick of butter and heavily butter the bottom and full side of the sauce pan. Assuming 4 participants @ 3eggs perparticipant, gently whisk 12 eggs in a bowl and pour into the sauce pan over very, very low heat. Stir slowly, but continuously with a wooden spoon (Brief breaks from stirring for a sip of the Bloody Mary are permitted). After about 7 minutes the eggs will begin to form as a creamy mixture (no large or heavy curds are allowed). If the setting accelerates too rapidly, remove saucepan from the heat and stir briefly but vigorously. Once the mixture is very creamy and smooth add 1 TBS cold butter, and 1/4 cup milk, cream, or, my preference, sour cream, to arrest the cooking process. Remove from the heat and add 1/4 cup grated parmesan and an 1/8 cup chopped scallions or an 1/8 cup chopped chives. Obviously, the number of optional additions, based upon personal preferance, is nearly infinite.

Serve immediately on warm plates with a light sprinkling of coarse salt and coarsely ground black pepper.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But having recently dragged out my Nero Wolfe Cookbook to present to this list, I tried his manner of preparing scrambled eggs in the top of a double boiler.  They turned out pretty gaggy actually, but that may be because they called for a LOT of cream -- and I only had milk in the house.  Even so, if I ever try it again (with cream), I'd cut way back on the cream.  <p>Eggs are wonderful whether boy, pooch or pry (to quote from the by-now famous call from a hotel guest to "ruin sorbees" in a hotel somewhere in Thailand). <p>Gail

Double boiler if I have the time. Low and slow yields extremely creamy eggs. They are like velvet. I don't add much liquid. Don't know how much Nero Wolfe was recommending.

I've also tried the hot and fast method and the medium heat method. I've stirred constantly, once in a whileor lift the sides up to let the uncooked egg run over onto the hot surface. I like large, creamy curds so low and slow does it for me.

--------------

Bob Bowen

aka Huevos del Toro

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't beat them or whisk them at all!

Add oil to pan. Break the eggs directly into the pan. Break up the yolks minimally while cooking, but don't beat them. Mix the eggs around to swirl around the yolk, and flip over a few times in teh process, but make sure the yolks remain largely separated from the white. Remove from heat when the eggs are still moist and soggy. They should harden up on your plate.

Best eggs ever, and they look marbled yellow and white. Very impressive looking.

This method, using olive oil, is great for scrambled egg sandwiches in baguette...

www.nutropical.com

~Borojo~

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My preference is a slow cooked method that I inherited (stole) from a French matron that was my next door neighbor in an apartment in Manhattan about 30 years ago. Takes 10+ minutes but it's a simple Zen kind of thing. Perfect time to have a Bloody Mary on the side.

Use a heavy medium saucepan, preferably non-stick. Grab a stick of butter and heavily butter the bottom and full side of the sauce pan. Assuming 4 participants @ 3eggs perparticipant, gently whisk 12 eggs in a bowl and pour into the sauce pan over very, very low heat. Stir slowly, but continuously with a wooden spoon (Brief breaks from stirring for a sip of the Bloody Mary are permitted). After about 7 minutes the eggs will begin to form as a creamy mixture (no large or heavy curds are allowed). If the setting accelerates too rapidly, remove saucepan from the heat and stir briefly but vigorously. Once the mixture is very creamy and smooth add 1 TBS cold butter, and 1/4 cup milk, cream, or, my preference, sour cream, to arrest the cooking process. Remove from the heat and add 1/4 cup grated parmesan and an 1/8 cup chopped scallions or an 1/8 cup chopped chives. Obviously, the number of optional additions, based upon personal preferance, is nearly infinite.

Serve immediately on warm plates with a light sprinkling of coarse salt and coarsely ground black pepper.

I remember hearing about this method on another thread some time ago. I have always meant to try it but I haven't had the opportunity... enough folks around for a big batch of eggs. Does anyone know the origin of this method?

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My preference is a slow cooked method that I inherited (stole) from a French matron that was my next door neighbor in an apartment in Manhattan about 30 years ago. Takes 10+ minutes but it's a simple Zen kind of thing. Perfect time to have a Bloody Mary on the side.

Use a heavy medium saucepan, preferably non-stick. Grab a stick of butter and heavily butter the bottom and full side of the sauce pan. Assuming 4 participants @ 3eggs perparticipant, gently whisk 12 eggs in a bowl and pour into the sauce pan over very, very low heat. Stir slowly, but continuously with a wooden spoon (Brief breaks from stirring for a sip of the Bloody Mary are permitted). After about 7 minutes the eggs will begin to form as a creamy mixture (no large or heavy curds are allowed). If the setting accelerates too rapidly, remove saucepan from the heat and stir briefly but vigorously. Once the mixture is very creamy and smooth add 1 TBS cold butter, and 1/4 cup milk, cream, or, my preference, sour cream, to arrest the cooking process. Remove from the heat and add 1/4 cup grated parmesan and an 1/8 cup chopped scallions or an 1/8 cup chopped chives. Obviously, the number of optional additions, based upon personal preferance, is nearly infinite.

Serve immediately on warm plates with a light sprinkling of coarse salt and coarsely ground black pepper.

I remember hearing about this method on another thread some time ago. I have always meant to try it but I haven't had the opportunity... enough folks around for a big batch of eggs. Does anyone know the origin of this method?

I'm not sure if the origin is even traceable. My method, due to a lack of patience, is an abbreviation of the original that I still occasionally do. Traditionally, the beaten eggs are strained to ensure smoothness. Butter, cream, etc are added at the beginning rather than at the end (which is my preference). The eggs are then cooked (slow continuous stirring with a wooden spoon) in a double boiler. The desired end result in either case are very creamy eggs that are somewhat custard-like. The eggs, obviously, may be eaten as they are or act as a "blank canvas" for whatever additions one might desire.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bushey~

I also love my (coddled) eggs to death with chili powder.  Just gives em a nice ZING that black pepper doesnt.

Pitter~

*quote from Bugs Bunny cartoon....After all, they laughed at the man when he discovered Penicillin!*

The first time I told someone I put a mustard/mayo mix on coddled eggs over toast they looked at me like I was nuts.

Can someone say DEVILED EGGS? or EGG SALAD?

You do it cold so why the hell not HOT?

I LOVE coddled eggs! These coddlers hold two eggs each with enough room left to pile on the herbs, spices, and meats. Four coddlers is barely enough to serve two people. :laugh:

f9f5cb17.jpg

--------------

Bob Bowen

aka Huevos del Toro

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On that French note, I'd like to add that my chef (who trained under Ducasse and a couple other big guns) insists on adding a dollop of creme fraiche to his scrambled eggs. I find that salt, white pepper, creme fraiche and eggs (not overbeaten) in large creamy curds tastes best.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...