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Scrambling/Scrambled Eggs


Fat Guy
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Egg preference is a strange thing.  Beyond the fact that some people like their scrambled eggs tighter or looser, or their yolks runny or gelled, there seems to be a fast food breakfast sandwich rule.

 

If it's on a biscuit it must be a homogeneous egg mixture, fried flat and folded.

 

If it's on an English muffin, it must be an egg simply cracked, yolk broke, and cooked through in a 'patty'.

 

I like a good breakfast sandwich and have learned to make the Hardee's biscuit, as well as an Egg McMuffin clone.  I've mixed and matched the egg styles, and the chains are right.  I'm not sure quite why, but those rules seem to hold.

 

But both of those treatments don't work in any other context.

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1 hour ago, gfweb said:

 

You must.

For scientific purposes.

I've already been there and done that and I don't like it and I won't ever do it again.

 

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

We live in hope. 

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4 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I should say I like large curds that are well cooked but still moist.

 

Sounds like the scrambled eggs you often get in a hotel buffet. And of course you need a little ketsup with them.  

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6 hours ago, Darienne said:

I'm with you on this one.  Never, never, never put any dairy into the egg.  

I got it in my head at a young age that water makes eggs tough and cream makes them tender. Not only do I not know where I got that idea, but I've never added water to my eggs so I don't even know if it's true. 

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image.thumb.jpeg.f08915855a4ca496c383cad75a06dbbc.jpeg

 

This brouillade (with black truffles) was cooked in a double boiler, whisking constantly for about 15 minutes. When almost done, a small tablespoonful of cream is added, to stop the cooking.  When the eggs are initially cracked into a bowl and whisked, a tablespoon or two of cold butter is cut into dice and mixed in with eggs before they go into the pan. 

 

https://www.masterclass.com/articles/chef-thomas-kellers-oeufs-brouilles-recipe-french-scrambled-eggs

 

As far as the OPs initial question, I guess my latest is the Jacques technique of cooking the chicken thighs on one side, covering, not turning as to basically finish cooking with the steam generated from the moisture in the pan.

 

I also cook other stuff (veg, chicken) along with the rice in the rice cooker,

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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Then there’s Poached scrambled eggs.
 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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I don't know how I ended up at the method, but my go-to:

 

Crack the eggs in the pan with Olive Oil or butter, stir gently as they are setting, add sriracha or chili of choice (right now using Aachar from a local vendor in Soweto), some cheese of choice, and keep stirring until juuuust before they are about to set. Then I add a little bit of either: Milk, cream, or yoghurt (depending on what is at hand), and let the excess moisture evaporate.

 

The result is soft, but not slimy, well-set but still glistening, and lovely striations of white, yellow, and red from the chili. I don't add salt or pepper because the chili has enough of both.

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PastaMeshugana

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