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fifi

Cooking Dried Beans

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Thank you so much, pbear - that is exactly the kind of information I tried and failed to find. I thought I was safe, but wasn't in the mood to kneel at the porcelain altar all night if I was wrong.

 

And thank you, rancho_gordo, for the technique notes. Now that I know what's what, it's time to place an order on your website and make something wonderful!

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Patty

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I think you are wise!  :smile:

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Visit beautiful Rancho Gordo!

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"How do you say 'Yum-o' in Swedish? Or is it Swiss? What do they speak in Switzerland?"- Rachel Ray

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People, Help!  I discovered an infestation in my lentil stores.  I have never seen beans infest before, and I'm pretty sure given the density in a certain bag that the weevil (or whatever it is -- it's a black multi-legged but that is on the large side for a weevil).  Anyway  They bags were confined inside of a big rubbermaid bin, so I'm hoping nothing got out into the other bins.  Not only have I never had a bean infest, I've never even heard of it!  I did see the same black bug in a different cabinet in a bag of walnuts following a sweep of the area; I've never had nuts infest either.  Have any of you had vermin infest your dry beans???

 

Meanwhile --   I have lots of beans in different bins in that original cabinet, and even though there is no evidence that the bugs got into those bags, it seems prudent to freeze everything for a few days.  [the thought of tossing what must be a hundred bucks of RG beans . . .]

 

But I'm afraid of condensation; should I air-dry the beans after they come out of the freezer, and then re-bag them?  (I have had been get moldy-smelling, which I assume indicates that there was some moisture.)  Any counsel??

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Wow!  NUTHIN'!!!  

 

This confirms my sense that dried beans don't infest commonly.  Those lentils were from a store that has big vats of all kinds of grains nearby, so I'm going to assume t that the situation entailed a granary weevil checking out the lentil bin, and laying some eggs just 'cause.  

 

Carry on.  I made the RG garbanzos this weekend, which I was not expecting to be particularly different from all the other ones since, well, old-world 'n all; but they were astonishingly delicious.  Like, the taste was something else.  Not that there is any rice or anything, since it all got tossed.  But, still.  A nice end to a difficult, costly-ass overhaul.  


Edited by SLB (log)
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I had creepy crawlies infest a jar of adzuki beans.  Don't know if they were weevils.

 

A few weeks ago I threw out a bin of cornmeal, semolina and probably a bag of beans that was infested with moths.  But I think it came from the semolina.  I didn't try to save the beans, but then again they were regular non-fancy beans and I was so grossed out I just tossed everything.  This was a week after I tossed out a bunch of boxes of nice pasta infested with grubs and beetles that were in a completely separate cupboard.

 

You are in good company, my friend.

 

Anyway, I froze a couple bags of cooked, non-buggy beans (great northern), and am planning to have some for dinner tonight.  I'm a bean newbie (didn't grow up eating beans), and I'd like to try fast baked beans with pre-cooked beans. What's a good recipe?  I will probably end up tossing ketchup, molasses, etc., bake it, and see what comes out the other end.

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Looking at the title and the avatar photo at the top of this page reminds me of how much I miss Fifi.  Especially at this time of the year and I recall her mentioning that after making a batch of burnt sugar candy, she scraped the pan after it had cooled and made a "meal" from the remains, unable to shove the pot into hot water and wash away all the good leavings.

 

I have never had a problem with weevils or similar bugs in beans but the incidence of creepy crawlies in the desert is not as pronounced as in areas with more ambient humidity.

I have had one incidence of opening a bag of "heirloom" beans that came in a 10-pound burlap bag and having a horned lizard fall out.  The poor thing seemed as startled as I was and I wondered what he had been living on - (bugs???).  Anyway, I caught him before the basenjis could and put him or her out in the yard and apparently it found a mate of some kind because for a number of years afterward I would see these little tan guys with the little horns on their faces, quite different from the native stock.

 

After freezing, I think it would be wise to put the beans in a wire colander and dry them well - I would use my dehydrator with the temp on low but a fan would do as well. 

Growing up on a farm where a lot of beans were grown, the beans were harvested by pulling or cutting the vines after the pods looked and felt dry and brittle, the mass was spread on the floor of the hay barn and allowed to dry some more out of the weather (it rained a fair amount in the early fall in western Kentucky) until they were considered "throughly dry" according to the man who was in charge.  They were "winnowed" in a machine that beat the hell out of the vines and pods and the dry beans and a lot of chaff fell into a long wire "box" which was also shaken and which conducted the beans down the length of it till they were funnelled into burlap bags - mostly 50 pounds - the bags sat on a scale.  Beans stored in this fashion, in a bag with air circulation, could be stored for many months.  The bags were stacked on slatted platforms and shifted every month or so, putting the top ones on the bottom and so on. 

 

I don't like to keep beans in plastic bags.  If they arrive in plastic bags I transfer them to glass jars or metal canisters (not aluminum, some beans can cause aluminum to corrode).  The hard acrilic plastics are okay but I have had some issues with bean in Cambro, the translucent flexible containers, which I love for most things but have had a couple of batches become mildewed or funky. 

 

I continue to use my electric pressure cooker for most bean dishes (not lentils, they cook rapidly) and have done a squash and beans "stew" using half of a kabocha squash I split with my neighbor, and "flavored" with some homemade sausage made from some chunks of pork "por carnitas" that I bought at the Mexican supermarket. 

I didn't follow a recipe so can't record that, but it turned out nicely, warm and satisfying for these chilly days.


Edited by andiesenji (log)
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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

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  I'm a bean newbie (didn't grow up eating beans), and I'd like to try fast baked beans with pre-cooked beans. What's a good recipe?  I will probably end up tossing ketchup, molasses, etc., bake it, and see what comes out the other end.

I just posted my recipe for baked beans in RecipeGullet. It may not be what you are looking for as I'm not sure what you mean by fast baked. 

 

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/152268-oklahoma-baked-beans/

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Thanks, Cyalexa - that looks tasty, I'll give it a go next time. By "fast", I mean that it can be baked in an hour or less (as opposed to the 4 hours or so some baked bean recipes call for). Anyway, I ended up mixing up ketchup, molasses and a few other ingredients, baked it for about 40 mins at 375F. Turned out pretty well. Leftovers for breakfast.

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Thanks, y'all.  

 

Beebs, I do my baked beans in the oven all night at 180 degreesF.  Your seasoning mixture sounds wonderful;  that said, in my home there will always be a fattyporky service meat involved.  

 

There is a Jamaican style recipe from Craig Claiborne years back that involves adding rum along with brown sugar for the sweetness component.  I recommend it.  


Edited by SLB (log)

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I love beans. I keep several different varieties on hand, but I always tend to find myself going back to my standards of red beans, navy beans, Great Northern beans, black beans and chickpeas. I use a fair amount of lentils, as well. 

 

My favorite baked beans recipe starts with soaked navy beans, in a sauce of ketchup, mustard, sorghum molasses, assorted spices, and worcestershire sauce. With, of course, salt pork, or, in a pinch, cut up very fatty bacon. I make a very non-regulation red beans and rice with a tomato base, andouille sausage, chicken and ham. Black beans get cooked with garlic, pepper and bay leaves. Chickpeas fan out in a variety of seasonings and sauces. I do a lentil soup with Spanish chorizo that's pretty marvelous. And it's really difficult to beat a good ol' bowl of white or pinto beans with hamhock and fresh, hot, buttered cornbread.

 

I bought some mung beans on a whim, and am trying to figure out how to use them.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

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Not exactly a bean, but after making hummus from dried chickpeas, I am never (except in a pinch!) using canned chickpeas again. What a difference!

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Not exactly a bean, but after making hummus from dried chickpeas, I am never (except in a pinch!) using canned chickpeas again. What a difference!

agreed. Canned in a pinch but dried is much better

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I usually use dried, but I had never had the RG garbanzos before; it's possible I'd never had recently-picked garbanzos before too, I guess.  They really did have more taste.  I have not experienced this with every single RG bean that has a commercially-grown counterpart, but the garbanzos were stunners.  

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I've mentioned it here more than once, but this recipe from janeer on her blog makes the best baked beans I've ever had in my life, bar none:

 

http://littlecomptonmornings.blogspot.com/2008/03/butterscotch-beans-saturday-night.html

 

That sounds really good.  I placed an order for RG beans yesterday and included a lb of Yellow Eyes to try this out.  I'm a little skeered about the idea of making my own salt pork (recovering vegetarian who has no idea where to even buy a pork belly  :laugh: ) but I'll give that part some thought as well.  Thanks for the link there, too.

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Last I used RG yellow eyes I used them in a beef stew dish for a super bowl meal. They were the winners

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