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"High On the Hog"


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A new Netflix documentary and its companion site, about African-American cuisine and its role in US history and culture.

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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I'd always heard historically it was poor folk food as there was an overabundance - like oysters. Love the reef re-building with the spent shells. I used to vacation in an area where the driveways and paths were crushed shells. When the light hit a certain way the bits sparkled.

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1 hour ago, AlaMoi said:

lobster had an interesting history in the food scene.

IIRC, indentured servants specified in their contracts the maximum times per week that they would have lobster. Prisoners weren't so lucky. 

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5 hours ago, heidih said:

Food52 did a  little pre-view about 5 of the chefs.  I am a bit familiar with some of the food and how it entered the US mainstream food culture. But oysters in NYC - I had no idea.  https://food52.com/blog/26250-high-on-the-hog-netflix-review

Kurlansky wrote at length about the oysters/NYC connection in one of his books.

Oh, duh...it *was* one of his books. The Big Oyster. Too tired to look up how to do an eG-friendly Amazon link (been chasing 3yo grandson for a few hours...)

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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On 6/4/2021 at 8:27 PM, chromedome said:

Kurlansky wrote at length about the oysters/NYC connection in one of his books.

Oh, duh...it *was* one of his books. The Big Oyster. Too tired to look up how to do an eG-friendly Amazon link (been chasing 3yo grandson for a few hours...)

 

This must be it... The Big Oyster: History on the Half Shell (eG-friendly Amazon.com link). The Amazon page has a good excerpt.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

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