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Titanium dioxide and tempering


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Hi! I started tempering chocolate in December despite saying I would never temper chocolate because it looks so complicated. Now I'm whipping up chocolates for every holiday and birthday gift. I'm not the best for sure, but I've been practicing a lot and I'm feeling good about the results (usually)!
 

I'm trying to make a bark that is mainly white with some red feathering. I used titanium dioxide for the first time to try to get the white chocolate whiter, and everything seemed to be going well, but after a half hour, the red chocolate (dark) has set but the white is very tacky. I can't find any information on if titanium dioxide affects the tempering process. Did I blow it?
 

 

48A76724-D64A-49E4-A3D3-94BE2CFA9612.jpeg

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Welcome @kannehearts

 

Guessing the white may simply not be in temper. What method do you use to temper? Perhaps the titanium dioxide is changing the cues you use to determine temper. 

 

Looks pretty neat though!

 

 

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I used the seeding method and brought the chocolate up to 110°F and back down to 87°F. It did eventually set, but it definitely has a chalky feel and, although the bark doesn't bend, the break isn't as sharp as it usually is. You can see in the photo that the bark didn't come off the acetate cleanly. It maybe just needed more time to set, or it was always going to be kind of off. Being my first go with titanium dioxide, I just eye balled the amount and kept adding until it was as white as I wanted. Which ended up being a lot. I'll reign it in next time. 

 

I'm going to do another test today. I think I added too much titanium dioxide so it just interfered with the temper. I'm hoping it will set better with less, and it isn't just a lost cause. TBD.

E70B4FAE-24CC-426E-B74A-12ED27729EAD.jpeg

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I have dealt with less-than-white white chocolate by adding Chef Rubber already-mixed white cocoa butter to it.  It's just a guess, but perhaps you are right that adding a large amount of titanium dioxide directly to the chocolate interferes with tempering.  Here is a previous post from Takomabaker that dealt with more or less the issue you have having.  If you are mixing your own white cocoa butter, a common recommendation is to mix 100g plain cocoa butter and 10g powdered oil-soluble color (in your case, titanium dioxide).  Most people use an immersion blender and then strain the result through very fine mesh or something similar.

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I have used titanium dioxide that wasn't made for use with chocolate before - it never worked well. I'm not sure if there is some difference that makes it more fat compatible.

 

 

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I tried again yesterday with similar results. I think I'm going to put this one down as a fail.

 

Thanks for the info Jim! I have do have white cocoa butter (I think mine is Roxy and Rich) so I'll give that a go today. At this point, I think I can learn to be content with yellowish white chocolate. I'll read through that discussion you sent as well!

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1 minute ago, kannehearts said:

I tried again yesterday with similar results. I think I'm going to put this one down as a fail.

 

Thanks for the info Jim! I have do have white cocoa butter (I think mine is Roxy and Rich) so I'll give that a go today. At this point, I think I can learn to be content with yellowish white chocolate. I'll read through that discussion you sent as well!

Also consider white Power Flowers. 

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Thanks Kerry! I saw Power Flowers briefly when I was learning how to temper and have since forgotten they are a thing. I'll look into it and see if this will help!

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Hmm, I can't seem to find a retailer that will ship to the US. While looking around though, I had a thought. Buttercream often has a similarly creamy yellow tone since it is butter based. A technique I've seen bakers use is adding a very small amount of violet to negate the yellow. I wonder if that would work!

 

I have a few options to try today!

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