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TdeV

TdeV


Clarity

Kim, One Note is a note taking package, owned by Microsoft, and so, like other Microsoft products, more ubiquitous and less useful (for those with demanding requirements) than other software. Evernote is also a note taking package.

 

The hard part in this discovery process (software selection) is determining what's possible, determining how much effort will be required to get what you think you want, and then selecting what you actually want.

 

Many/most recipe website locations will allow you to print a hard copy of a recipe. Then you can file the paper in a binder with other recipes. If you learn how, you can save the "printed copy" as a simple file (pdf, txt) and store it on your computer. If you learn how, you can add text into a pdf with your notes about cooking that recipe.

 

Both of the aforementioned methods escape the issue of having your data in software that has reached end-of-life.

 

Either printing a recipe to printer or file has the issue of finding the recipe when you want it. It's very hard to browse through physical paper or computer files when you're trying to get an idea about something. With paper recipes, the recipe is physically filed in only one place. In a cookbook, a recipe may be discoverable through a well-constructed index. With a computer file, the recipe may be filed by title - which files may be discoverable by some rudimentary search.

 

No fancy software is required to do any of the aforementioned, just develop some consistent habits.

 

However, this surely shortchanges the power of computers.

 

Many online recipe programs will store your recipes for you (with the caveat about end-of-life software). Most give you the ability to categorize your recipes in some pre-determined fashion. Most give you the ability to look up stuff based on some pre-determined rules. Which may or may not be an insurmountable issue for you; you'd be surprised how limited many products are. For example, I was looking into Eat Your Books and wanted to look up recipes based on the cooking vessel (e.g. Instant Pot). Not possible. This was a deal breaker for me, not because the Instant Pot search was all that important, but because it illustrated how controlled was the available data).

 

Of the more general note-taking products (One Note, Evernote), you have to create your own structure.

One feature of these products are keywords (called Tags in Evernote) which can be applied to a single Note. Here are some sample keywords:

Where: Africa, America.North, Asia.South, Europe.Central, Europe.Western

Meal Course: Appetizer.Tapas, Dessert, Leftover, Lunch, Soup

Cookery Method: Bake.Roast, Braise, Brine.Brining, Boil, Grill, Pressure.Cooker, Steam.Oven

Pastry

Cheese

Jam

Sauce

Tomato

Potato

etc.

 

Many programs offer a general word search. If you type "pepper" in the search box, you'll end up with recipes including black pepper, jalapeno, and green bell pepper (sorry, @rotuts). This is one of the features of keyword (tag) search, you'll only end up with notes which you have determined belong to that categorization. And if you're looking for all  European recipes, the search would be " tag:Europe* " (not including quotes).

 

There are lots and lots of other issues. Got questions?

 

P.S. If folks want to start a discussion about developing classification systems for computerized recipe management, I will participate.

TdeV

TdeV


Clarity

Kim, One Note is a note taking package, owned by Microsoft, and so, like other Microsoft products, more ubiquitous and less useful (for those with demanding requirements) than other software. Evernote is also a note taking package.

 

The hard part in this discovery process (software selection) is determining what's possible, determining how much effort will be required to get what you think you want, and then selecting what you actually want.

 

Many/most recipe website locations will allow you to print a hard copy of a recipe. Then you can file the paper in a binder with other recipes. If you learn how, you can save the "printed copy" as a simple file (pdf, txt) and store it on your computer. If you learn how, you can add text into a pdf with your notes about cooking that recipe.

 

Both of the aforementioned methods escape the issue of having your data in software that has reached end-of-life.

 

Either printing a recipe to printer or file has the issue of finding the recipe when you want it. It's very hard to browse through physical paper or computer files when you're trying to get an idea about something. With paper recipes, the recipe is physically filed in only one place. In a cookbook, a recipe may be discoverable through a well-constructed index. With a computer file, the recipe may be filed by title - which files may be discoverable by some rudimentary search.

 

No fancy software is required to do any of the aforementioned, just develop some consistent habits.

 

However, this surely shortchanges the power of computers.

 

Many online recipe programs will store your recipes for you (with the caveat about end-of-life software). Most give you the ability to categorize your recipes in some pre-determined fashion. Most give you the ability to look up stuff based on some pre-determined rules. Which may or may not be an insurmountable issue for you; you'd be surprised how limited many products are. For example, I was looking into Eat Your Books and wanted to look up recipes based on the cooking vessel (e.g. Instant Pot). Not possible. This was a deal breaker for me, not because the Instant Pot search was all that important, but because it illustrated how controlled was the available data).

 

Of the more general note-taking products (One Note, Evernote), you have to create your own structure.

One feature of these products are keywords (called Tags in Evernote) which can be applied to a single Note. Here are some sample keywords:

Where: Africa, America.North,Asia.South,Europe.Central, Europe.Western

Meal Course: Appetizer.Tapas,Dessert,Leftover,Lunch,Soup

Cookery Method: Bake.Roast,Braise,Brine.Brining,Boil,Grill,Pressure.Cooker,Steam.Oven

Pastry

Cheese

Jam

Sauce

Tomato

Potato

etc.

 

Many programs offer a general word search. If you type "pepper" in the search box, you'll end up with recipes including black pepper, jalapeno, and green bell pepper (sorry, @rotuts). This is one of the features of keyword (tag) search, you'll only end up with notes which you have determined belong to that categorization. And if you're looking for all  European recipes, the search would be " tag:Europe* " (not including quotes).

 

There are lots and lots of other issues. Got questions?

 

P.S. If folks want to start a discussion about developing classification systems for computerized recipe management, I will participate.

TdeV

TdeV

Kim, One Note is a note taking package, owned by Microsoft, and so, like other Microsoft products, more ubiquitous and less useful (for those with demanding requirements) than other software. Evernote is also a note taking package.

 

The hard part in this discovery process (software selection) is determining what's possible, determining how much effort will be required to get what you think you want, and then selecting what you actually want.

 

Many/most recipe website locations will allow you to print a hard copy of a recipe. Then you can file the paper in a binder with other recipes. If you learn how, you can save the "printed copy" as a simple file (pdf, txt) and store it on your computer. If you learn how, you can add text into a pdf with your notes about cooking that recipe.

 

Both of the aforementioned methods escape the issue of having your data in software that has reached end-of-life.

 

Either printing a recipe to printer or file has the issue of finding the recipe when you want it. It's very hard to browse through physical paper or computer files when you're trying to get an idea about something. With paper recipes, the recipe is physically filed in only one place. In a cookbook, a recipe may be discoverable through a well-constructed index. With a computer file, the recipe may be filed by title - which files may be discoverable by some rudimentary search.

 

No fancy software is required to do any of the aforementioned, just develop some consistent habits.

 

However, this surely shortchanges the power of computers.

 

Many online recipe programs will store your recipes for you (with the caveat about end-of-life software). Most give you the ability to categorize your recipes in some pre-determined fashion. Most give you the ability to look up stuff based on some pre-determined fashion. Which may or may not be an insurmountable issue for you; you'd be surprised how limited many products are. For example, I was looking into Eat Your Books and wanted to look up recipes based on the cooking vessel (e.g. Instant Pot). Not possible. This was a deal breaker for me, not because the Instant Pot search was all that important, but because it illustrated how controlled was the available data).

 

Of the more general note-taking products (One Note, Evernote), you have to create your own structure.

One feature of these products are keywords (called Tags in Evernote) which can be applied to a single Note. Here are some sample keywords:

Where: Africa, America.North,Asia.South,Europe.Central, Europe.Western

Meal Course: Appetizer.Tapas,Dessert,Leftover,Lunch,Soup

Cookery Method: Bake.Roast,Braise,Brine.Brining,Boil,Grill,Pressure.Cooker,Steam.Oven

Pastry

Cheese

Jam

Sauce

Tomato

Potato

etc.

 

Many programs offer a general word search. If you type "pepper" in the search box, you'll end up with recipes including black pepper, jalapeno, and green bell pepper (sorry, @rotuts). This is one of the features of keyword (tag) search, you'll only end up with notes which you have determined belong to that categorization. And if you're looking for all  European recipes, the search would be " tag:Europe* " (not including quotes).

 

There are lots and lots of other issues. Got questions?

 

P.S. If folks want to start a discussion about developing classification systems for computerized recipe management, I will participate.

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