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What are these leaves?


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I picked up a bag full of these greens this morning at the market. The sign said chicory, which would make it a variety I've never seen before. Does anyone know what it is? Any classic preparations?

 

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"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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Its the “head” of chicory (a quite nice walkthrough through the different varieties can be found here).

 

Depending on the bitterness I’d braise it with some cured meat product (for the less bitter ones), or stirfry with garlic and salt (bitter ones) as a side dish.

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Yeah, I'd say radicchio.

More here: https://www.johnnyseeds.com/vegetables/chicory/radicchio/

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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

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10 hours ago, DanM said:

I picked up a bag full of these greens this morning at the market. The sign said chicory, which would make it a variety I've never seen before. Does anyone know what it is? Any classic preparations?

 

Thanks!

IMG_20200128_071345.jpg

I halve it, moosh in EVOO, salt a

nd pepper then grill it until charred in a grill pan.   Drizzle with good balsamic .    Yum!

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eGullet member #80.

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40 minutes ago, heidih said:

A gratin of some sort? You are in the land of cheese - balances the bitter


True. The Belgians are very fond of gratinated chicory (the yellow-white, straight form), with bechamel, ham & cheese. I bet they have other “traditional” dishes as well ...

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10 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

I halve it, moosh in EVOO, salt a

nd pepper then grill it until charred in a grill pan.   Drizzle with good balsamic .    Yum!

That would have been my response but I have never seen it with such loose leaves. I think those loose leaves would be quite a challenge in terms of grilling it. The  radicchio that I can buy is tight like a head of iceberg or cabbage. Grilling really tames its bitterness. 

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26 minutes ago, Anna N said:

That would have been my response but I have never seen it with such loose leaves. I think those loose leaves would be quite a challenge in terms of grilling it. The  radicchio that I can buy is tight like a head of iceberg or cabbage. Grilling really tames its bitterness. 

I often/usually tie each portion with string.   Once charred, the bundle will stay intact.    Also do this for grilling romaine et al. 

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eGullet member #80.

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I think I'll fire up the barbeque and grill them with some chicken. Thanks!

 

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"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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