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Attorneymrs

Italian Copper cookware Help

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After a lot of research I found an Italian copper cookware collection I want to buy. I was going to post it here to see if there was anyone who had used them before but didn’t want to violate any rules. Is it better to have you all recommend copper items or companies to me to see if anyone has used it? Or can I share it here?

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Posted (edited)

IF you've found it online, then you can post a link to the appropriate page. The only relevant rule that I can think of is that you shouldn't post images you don't own the copyright to (without the owner's permission), but again a link to an image on a website is permissible.

 

I have no experience with copper pans, I'm afraid, so  I won't be much use to you!


Edited by liuzhou (log)

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From the site: "Lined With 100% Pure Tin"

 

From eGullet's Understanding Stovetop Cookware:
 

Quote

 

Copper with an Interior Lining of Tin

- Otherwise similar to Copper With an Interior Lining of Stainless Steel, but employing tin instead of stainless steel on the interior.

- Tin is less durable than stainless steel. After a while, the tin lining will wear out and the interior will have to be re-tinned. May not be used at high heat, as this will cause the tin lining to blister and melt.

- Tin has significantly better thermal conductivity ( 0.666 W/cm K) than stainless steel. As a result, some people feel that tin-lined copper offers the ultimate in temperature control for sauce making.

- Very expensive (less expensive than stainless-lined copper).

- Common uses: Almost every pan in the kitchen is manufactured in this design. From a practical standpoint, probably useful to most home cooks as a dedicated pan for sauces only. I do not recommend it for home cooks.

 

 


So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money. But when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness."

So I got that goin' for me, which is nice.

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Definitely read the Understanding Stovetop Cookware info linked to above.  That will give you the info you need to assess your kitchen situation and determine if the pots you _want_ are the pots you will gain the most benefit from.  Pretty but useless should not be the objective... unless you're a Realtor looking to stage a kitchen . 

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Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

Learn to brew beer with my eGCI course

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

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I don't know that specific producer, so I can't comment on the quality of their products.

 

But beware that copper pans have lots of contraindications:

- they are really expensive, so you need to be extra-sure they are really what you need;

- they need tons of maintenance, copper side needs to be polished frequently otherwise you loose the shine after a couple of uses, tin side needs to be refurbished periodically;

- they are HEAVY, this can be a problem for your arms in the long term and/or if you use them frequently;

- you need skills to put their qualities to good use, if you don't feel confident you are able to make the most of them then you won't notice much differences with the results you get with stainless steel cookware.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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I will say my friends like the lack of luster the copper has after a few years - there is some name for it like patina or something. Two of my friends said with proper care they haven’t had to retin them and they have had them for over 2 years. Another friend had to have it re-tinned after a year but said the company did it fast, inexpensively  and they came back beautiful. But I certainly see what you are saying. They are sort of a luxury gift to myself after a hard couple of years. So I do understand they may not be the most practical but that’s my thinking for getting them. But thank you all for the feedback. 

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Posted (edited)

I own two copper pots (neither from Navarini), and both are steel-lined. 

 

I personally would lose my mind if I had to re-line a working piece after a year.  


Edited by SLB (log)
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I'm no expert, but my understanding is that some foods or methods of cooking benefit from copper more than others, so it might be wise to research that and perhaps buy one or two pans that have the most use potential before springing for a large set. Plenty of inexpensive materials have far more advantages, such as carbon steel and cast iron. 

 

I have two copper pans. One is stainless steel lined, a medium size pot that is wider than it is tall and can make a risotto for three or four or a quart of home made ketchup. More than anything I use it for making slow-cooked grits. I rarely polish it so it looks as you would expect, but it is a great pan. Call the finish a patina, in a good light. I've had it for at least 25 years and can't see any reason why it won't last at least that long, not that I will know the difference by then. I use it maybe three or four times a month. 

 

My other copper pan is a saute pan of dubious quality which I purchased at a Good Will many years ago. It is just the right size for a tarte tatin, and that's what it has been used for. I don't think it is tin lined, but it isn't heavy duty. It gets very little use otherwise, but that is justified given the price I paid for it.  

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6 hours ago, Attorneymrs said:

They are sort of a luxury gift to myself after a hard couple of years.

 

After reading this, my heart would say "go buy them immediately", since it's one of the most solid reasons for buying something.

My brain would say to buy one to get an idea, then decide for the rest. Just ask yourself which pots / pans you use more frequently and if a copper one would give better results. Usually you see big differences for risotto or for sauces. It depends a lot on what you cook frequently, if you cook risotto once a week then a proper copper pan would be a very nice thing. Remember it takes elbow grease to clean them.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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Depending on how hard you use them the tin lining should last many years mine goes 5 years before needing to be refined and it was well used. It’s now packed away and rarely bothered with. While a gorgeous frying pan it is no longer suitable for the cooking I do nor do I have the interest in the effort in care. 

 

They are gorgeous pans and a pleasure to cook in, they bring nostalgia and joy when cooking with it that few pieces of kitchen cookware do and they absolutely get the “classy” oohs when a copper pan arrives at the table with a butterflied chicken or a dessert or some other simple food that looks extravagant in a copper pan. 

 

If this is something you have coveted for some time, buy a few pieces, a frying pan of 1 or 2 sizes (1 pan enough to cook a meal for two and the other for 4 people) and perhaps a pot or i’d Personally go for a braiser which is wide and good for reducing. If you really have the money guy everything and show it off in your kitchen and it’ll make you smile for decades! 

 

Use it on gas, it goes pan, fat, meat, heat and in that order you don’t preheat copper you either immediately cook in it or you’ve fu**ed your pan.

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Unless your love of these is primarily esthetic, I'd advise against buying the set. Maaaaybe get a saucepan or two. Those won't get preheated on hight heat, so you'll be unlikely to melt off the tin. You'll benefit from the precise temperature control. A little bit ... I have copper saucepans and clad aluminum / stainless saucepans, and in practice the difference is utterly unimportant. They won't make you a better cook.

 

The skillet / sautée pans are a bad idea. Pans like this need to be preheated on high heat. I heat all my pans (except my one lonely teflon pan) to temperatures that would turn the lining into a shiny puddle. Searing food properly makes this a necessity much of the time. Also: the brass handles are highly conductive. The only reason anyone puts brass handles on a pan is that they're pretty. They're not the smartest idea. The roasting pan is just a colossal waste of money. You don't need any of the qualities of copper in a roasting pan. Least of all the price and weight. 

 

Generally, there are no sets of anything that are a good value. Different materials serve different purposes. If you do want copper saucepans for their performance characteristics, there's more utility in stainless-clad copper. The three brands are Mauviel (France) Bougeat (France) and Falk (Belgium). Falk makes the laminated material for all these companies, so the performance is identical for all, as long as your remember to get the 2.5mm thickness. Falk is also the least expensive (but often the hardest to find). 

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Notes from the underbelly

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