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chanjying

Melting/reusing aerated chocolate?

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I made aerated chocolate using the recipe from Greweling's "Chocolates & Confections." However, the air bubbles are not very big and I'm not a huge fan of the finished result. I would much prefer to reuse it in a different form. Any idea if it would be possible to melt and reuse the couverture? Or is it doomed since now it has a bunch of O2/NO in it? I worked so hard to get the bubbles in and now I want them out! 😣

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30 minutes ago, chanjying said:

I made aerated chocolate using the recipe from Greweling's "Chocolates & Confections." However, the air bubbles are not very big and I'm not a huge fan of the finished result. I would much prefer to reuse it in a different form. Any idea if it would be possible to melt and reuse the couverture? Or is it doomed since now it has a bunch of O2/NO in it? I worked so hard to get the bubbles in and now I want them out! 😣

Should be fine.

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4 hours ago, chanjying said:

I made aerated chocolate using the recipe from Greweling's "Chocolates & Confections." However, the air bubbles are not very big and I'm not a huge fan of the finished result. I would much prefer to reuse it in a different form. Any idea if it would be possible to melt and reuse the couverture? Or is it doomed since now it has a bunch of O2/NO in it? I worked so hard to get the bubbles in and now I want them out! 😣

 

I'm considering that recipe.  Could you say any more about your experience making it?

 

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11 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I'm considering that recipe.  Could you say any more about your experience making it?


I'm not that person but I've done both his and Heston Blumenthal's versions many times. Heston's version is easier because the chocolate isn't tempered so you can keep the temperature much higher going into the whipper. I've had issues with clogging from solidified chocolate doing Greweling's method a couple times. Makes for a fun whipper cleanup. Heston also adds a small amount of a neutral oil to his version,. He claims it helps with the bubbles and it gives a final texture closer to the commercial aerated chocolate I've had. Regardless of which method is used, you get much larger bubbles by shooting the chocolate into whatever it's being molded in, tossing it in a vacuum sealer, pulling a vacuum until the chocolate expands and leaving it in there to set before releasing the vacuum. I don't own a chamber sealer and no longer have access to the one I used to use so I haven't done the aerated chocolate in a long time. It was really just a novelty thing that was fun to do for a bit anyway, I don't often find myself missing it.


Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Clogging the iSi is what I am afraid of.  I did the experiment of placing a mold of chocolate in my chamber vacuum sealer and I indeed got bubbles.  In that case, unintended bubbles.

 

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1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Clogging the iSi is what I am afraid of. I did the experiment of placing a mold of chocolate in my chamber vacuum sealer and I indeed got bubbles.


Heston still uses the whipper. He sprays it from the whipper into the mold and then immediately goes into the vacuum sealer. It makes for almost ridiculously big bubbles if you pull it far enough. If you pull it too far, it collapses.

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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21 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I'm considering that recipe.  Could you say any more about your experience making it?

 

I can echo Tri2Cook's experience of having the nozzle clogged. Clean up was a drag! I found that the chocolate cooled down too quickly, even when heating up the whipper to the 90 F. I guess that's why Heston's recipe/method has its appeal, but I didn't want to create a vacuum seal!

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18 minutes ago, chanjying said:

I can echo Tri2Cook's experience of having the nozzle clogged. Clean up was a drag! I found that the chocolate cooled down too quickly, even when heating up the whipper to the 90 F. I guess that's why Heston's recipe/method has its appeal, but I didn't want to create a vacuum seal!

 

Turn off the sealing function for doing this.

 

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1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Turn off the sealing function for doing this.

 

The suggestion I saw was to turn on the chamber vac - when it reaches the neg pressure you want - flip it off. It will stay sealed with the same negative pressure. After enough time for the chocolate to set - turn it on again to release the vacuum. 

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12 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

The suggestion I saw was to turn on the chamber vac - when it reaches the neg pressure you want - flip it off. It will stay sealed with the same negative pressure. After enough time for the chocolate to set - turn it on again to release the vacuum. 

 

I thought @chanjying meant the bag sealing function.

 

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29 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I thought @chanjying meant the bag sealing function.

 

But if you let it go through the cycle it will still release the vacuum - this way you can keep it under vacuum until it solidifies.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Kerry Beal said:

But if you let it go through the cycle it will still release the vacuum - this way you can keep it under vacuum until it solidifies.

 

 

 

My Polyscience has a cycle for holding vacuum.

 

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16 hours ago, chanjying said:

I guess that's why Heston's recipe/method has its appeal, but I didn't want to create a vacuum seal!


I find Heston's version easier to work with even if you don't bother with the vacuum chamber. The resulting bubbles are as good as the bubbles I get from Greweling's version even without the vacuum. The vacuum can be used with Greweling's version as well to get better bubbles and eliminates the added oil... just have to work quick and hope chocolate doesn't harden in the nozzle when charging the whipper. That's the only difficulty I had with Greweling's version, the low starting temp of the chocolate because he calls for it to be in temper.

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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