Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

gulfporter

Quince Paste in a Chutney?

Recommended Posts

Known here as Ate de Membrillo. 

 

There was a woman selling her homemade quince paste on the street today.   I bought way too much, though it was only 20 pesos worth.

 

We like it as part of a cold plate with prosciutto or smoked salmon, etc.  I also insert it into a grilled ham and cheese sandwich with a spicy mustard. 

 

Now I am thinking of using it as part of a chutney.  Had a quince tree at our Bisbee AZ home and made quince chutneys a lot.  But this time I would be using quince paste, not the fruit.  

 

Maybe simmer some onions, raisins and jalapenos with vinegar and spices (cardamom and ginger for sure), add diced fresh apple toward the end (like when they keep a bit of their shape).  Let it cool down then add the diced quince paste.  I think the mouth feel of the soft quince paste will be good, though I could just add it to the hot ingredients instead, and let it melt down???

 

Any opinions on this?  Or any ideas on other uses for the paste?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don' t know how it is in hour neck of the woods in Ajijic, but here in Michoacán right now the mercado is full of women selling fresh quince (membrillos). Perhaps you could ask around to see if anyone has a tree or knows someone selling them in the markets so you could use the whole fruit, as you were accustomed to in Bisbee. I've already made a large batch of jam and I'm considering trying to make the paste, though the ate (paste) is readily available here. I also made a very tasty liqueur with it last year, using a basic limoncello recipe modified to use quince instead of lemon/lime rind. I have a lime tree so I used limes.

 

I like your idea of using diced apple to simulate the chunkiness of chutney. What about using dried apples? Might intensify the apple flavor, if you think that would work. By letting the mixture cool before you add the quince paste you'd probably maintain the chunks of paste rather than melting them into the warm mixture. Are you planning to freeze this or otherwise preserve it, or will you just make the chutney as needed?

 

It's strange--I'd never noticed quince in the mercado before, but for some reason this year I realized that the place was full of them. None of the big puestos, of course, just the village women on the street.

 

Nancy in Pátzcuaro

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We always have fresh quince here this time of year. 

 

A town just to the north of us is called Ixtlahuacan de los Membrillos (Membrillos = Quince).....they just had their annual fiesta which features quince in all forms, shapes and sizes.  The woman from whom I bought the ate' (paste) is from there.   I bought so much of it I am trying to come up with other uses for it and we don't see chutney for sale here (other than high-priced imports). 

 

I am hoping the ate' will add the quince flavor to what would otherwise be an apple chutney.  I don't recall seeing dried apples here but can't say that I have looked for them.

 

Here is a recent story on the annual July fiesta in Ixtlahuacan.  We have gone to it in the past and like all small town fiestas, it is a wondrous experience.

 

https://theguadalajarareporter.net/index.php/expat-living/expat-living/lake-chapala/community-news/52141-ixtlahuacan-hosts-summer-festivities

Quote

 

Ixtlahuacán de los Membrillos is one of the numerous Mexican towns that embrace Santo Santiago (St. James the Greater) as patron saint.

 

Wrapped into the town’s lively fiestas patronales, underway through Wednesday, July 25, are colorful religious processions taking place each morning and afternoon, nighttime entertainment and firework displays at the central plaza, as well as the adjacent street fair where booths are stocked with food, drink, crafts and miscellanea.

 

Patron saint of Spain, Santo Santiago was introduced to Mexico in the 16th century to aid Christian friars in vanquishing pagan beliefs.

 

During celebrations in the saint’s honor, portrayals of his legendary battles against the forces of evil are performed by the famed masked Tastones of Tonala, similar ritual dancers in Ixtlahaucan and the spectacular Tlahualiles of Sahuayo, Michoacán.

 

Festivities in Ixtlahuacán will continue July 27 through 29, during the fourth annual Festival del Membrillo showcasing the town’s signature fruit – the quince. The program includes a culinary competition featuring quince-based beverages, desserts and dishes, as well as commercial displays of diverse products made from the fruit.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I adore the late Laurie Colwin's writing in general. Recently I unearthed a folder of her pieces torn from when I pitched my Gourmets.  Her article on chutney in sends the message - of course - try it.  "The Glory of Chutney" (Gourmet/February 1993).  She says "Chutney is also forgiving...Heavenly batches of the stuff are often the result of such substitutions."

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course! I'd forgotten about Ixtlahuacan de los Membrillos. As I recall it's north of the lake. We've never been to the fiesta though we've driven through the town. So you have no shortage of the fresh fruit to use if you get tired of the ate.

 

Nancy in Pátzcuaro

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quince are just starting to appear at our markets here, but are usually better after a frost (so we have a while to go). I make quince jelly, which I usually use for Christmas cookies (especially Windowpanes). Easiest thing in the world. No peel, no core, just wipe clean, chop (hello cleaver), cover w/H2O and cook to soft. Pureé. Hang like jelly in a cheesecloth, overnight. NO SQUEEZING!!! They are high in pectin, so no need for extra. If you'd like, you can add spices (cloves, cinnamon, etc., mace is my favourite) while they're cooking - just like apple jelly. In Bavarian it's called "Quittenkäs". And oh, the color!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×