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zoe b

How to cook sweet bun dough?

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zoe b   

We went to the asian grocer today, and I picked these buns up, but can't figure out how to cook them--steam or bake, or what? Help is appreciated.

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Deryn   

I hope Liuzhou or Huiray will chime in here but I always steam Chinese buns (over an inch or so of medium heat water, for about 15 minutes or so) - at least as a first step. If they are savoury, I have also then occasionally used the frying pan to add a crisp bottom to them (a la potsticker method) but I don't know how that would go with a plain bun.

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I agree with Deryn that liuzhou or huiray could provide you with a better answer, and that they are probably best steamed.

 

I do know that most Chinese buns are steamed, and ovens aren't that common, even to this day in China.

 

I don't own a bamboo steamer, but many Western households have one of those expandable stainless steamer baskets that adapt to the size of your lidded pot like mine does, and it works just fine.

 

I'm also surprised that since the packaging has English along with Chinese? and is out of Brooklyn, NY, that they don't include any guidance on cooking. They do include a phone number. A miracle could occur, and you could actually contact helpful customer service. :smile:

 

I have access to a great pan-Asian market too within walking distance. I tend not to buy stuff unless I already know what to do with it or there are English instructions. There's one lady who works there (suspect she's an owner) who is friendly and very helpful, but she's not always there when I am. When she is, she is willing to answer my questions and help me find stuff. The other staff (all Asian, as are the bulk of the shoppers) don't have much love for my non-Asian self. If you can find a helpful employee or owner in your store, it will really be a boon to you in your interest in Asian food preparation. I have really benefited by my market lady's willingness to educate me, and by reading about what huiray and liuzhou have to say on this ancient, and to me very delicious, cuisine.

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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zoe b   

Thanks for the Crepes-- you're making me laugh. My Asian grocery store is in NJ--the parking lot alone is a death trap. No one speaks English, and no one is helpful. The fish guy actively hates my husband. I don't care, though, there is great stuff there, and part of the fun is getting something that you don't know anything about.

 

The last time, I accidentally bought that Korean sauce that everyone is talking about.

 

I get beautiful vegetables, fish, sometimes meat, frozen dumplings, tofu, condiments, fun crackers and snack and desserts.

 

I will steam the buns tonight. I did google the factory, no results.

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